Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

You are looking at 1-20 of 167 entries  for:

  • All: moral suasion x
clear all

View:

Overview

moral suasion

A regulatory body's use of argument and persuasion, rather than coercion or legislation, to influence the activities of those within its purview. The term is often applied to the efforts ...

moral suasion

moral suasion   Reference library

The Handbook of International Financial Terms

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... suasion . A form of persuasive pressure applied by regulators to firms to adopt a desirable course of action which is not backed up by regulatory authority or law. It works because the regulated firms wish to maintain good relations with the regulators. Sometimes applied to policy objectives. The Japanese have made an art of the practice through administrative guidance . Formerly in the UK, the Bank of England operated largely through the use of moral suasion...

moral suasion

moral suasion   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Business and Management (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
52 words

... suasion A regulatory body’s use of argument and persuasion, rather than coercion or legislation, to influence the activities of those within its purview. The term is often applied to the efforts of the Federal Reserve Board ( see Federal Reserve System ) to persuade its members to comply with its...

moral suasion

moral suasion   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Finance and Banking (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... suasion A regulatory body’s use of argument and persuasion, rather than coercion or legislation, to influence the activities of those within its purview. The term is often applied to the efforts of the Federal Reserve Board ( see federal reserve system ) to persuade its members to comply with its policies....

Moral Suasion

Moral Suasion   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
604 words

... Suasion Moral suasion was a nonviolent means of abolition that reached its height between 1830 and 1840 with the formation of American antislavery and moral-reform societies. With roots in the Enlightenment, moral suasion aimed to abolish slavery by appealing to the consciences of slavery's advocates. Before the approach was popularized by the abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison , Quakers and free blacks practiced moral suasion throughout New York and Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century. The movement found its greatest popularity among middle-class...

moral suasion

moral suasion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A regulatory body's use of argument and persuasion, rather than coercion or legislation, to influence the activities of those within its purview. The term is often applied to the efforts of the ...
Law

Law   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,210 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to the county towns of England and Wales remained an essential administrative point of contact between the centre and the localities; they were also perceived by Georgian governments as primary media for communicating the good news about equal rights under common law and for moral suasion of the lower orders. And in the absence of real *policing [7] , substantial property owners and the proliferating business community in London and other cities looked to the criminal law as the primary safeguard for their property against what they were inclined to believe...

jawboning

jawboning  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The routine of policy-makers to ‘talk up’ a situation as an alternative to (painful) concrete actions. This applies particularly to situations such as the depreciation of a currency, where ...
incomes policy

incomes policy  

A government policy aimed at controlling inflation and maintaining full employment by holding down increases in wages and other forms of income and prices by means of statute or moral suasion.
Christian Recorder

Christian Recorder  

The Christian Recorder, which began publication in Philadelphia in July 1852, was not the first African American newspaper; nevertheless, it was an important milestone in the history of black ...
Edmund Quincy

Edmund Quincy  

(b. 1 February 1808; d. 17 May 1877), abolitionist, writer, and editor.Edmund Quincy was the son of the Harvard president, Boston mayor, and U.S. congressional member Josiah Quincy and ...
William Jay

William Jay  

(b. 16 June 1789; d. 14 October 1858), reformer and abolitionist.William Jay, the second son of Sarah Van Brugh Livingston and John Jay, the first chief justice of the ...
James McCune Smith

James McCune Smith  

(b. 18 April 1813; d. 17 November 1865), black abolitionist and physician.James McCune Smith was born in New York City as the son of slaves; all that is known ...
Charles Lenox Remond

Charles Lenox Remond  

(b. 1 February 1810; d. 22 December 1873), abolitionist, reformer, and orator.Charles Lenox Remond was born free in Salem, Massachusetts, the first son of John and Nancy (Lenox) Remond. ...
Western New York Anti-Slavery Society

Western New York Anti-Slavery Society  

In 1842 the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society (WNYASS) was formed in Rochester, New York, at the Washington Street Presbyterian Church after a crowded three-day convention organized by the ...
Joshua R. Giddings

Joshua R. Giddings  

(b. 6 October 1795; d. 27 May 1864), the most outspoken critic of slavery in the U.S. Congress for over two decades.Insisting that the Constitution made no provisions for ...
London rules

London rules  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A set of guidelines, approved by the Bank of England, relating to the treatment of distressed borrowers.
National Conventions of Colored Men

National Conventions of Colored Men  

In the decades before the Civil War, African American intellectual and social leaders held a variety of state and national conventions to address the many challenges facing blacks in the ...
Perfectionism

Perfectionism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Radical religious doctrine, assuming the immediate and total cessation of sin, advanced by J. H. Noyes, was the leading principle of his Oneida Community. Perfectionism was a manifestation of the ...
Samuel Ringgold Ward

Samuel Ringgold Ward  

(1817–1866).African‐American abolitionist who lectured in England. Ward was born a slave but managed to escape with his parents to New York State, where he was educated and later taught ...
Lombard rate

Lombard rate  

Reference type:
Overview Page
1 The rate of interest at which the German central bank, the Bundesbank, lends to German commercial banks, usually ½% above the discount rate.2 The interest rate charged by a European commercial bank ...

View: