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Overview

military-industrial complex

A country's military establishment and those industries producing arms or other military materials, regarded as a powerful vested interest. The term derives from a speech by US President ...

military-industrial complex

military-industrial complex   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...-industrial complex a country's military establishment and those industries producing arms or other military materials, regarded as a powerful vested...

military–industrial complex

military–industrial complex   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2023

...–industrial complex In a nation, those industries that provide materiel for the military, together with the military establishment itself. Try Barnes (2008) Geoforum 31, 9, 3 ; it is very...

military-industrial complex

military-industrial complex   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
88 words

...-industrial complex The set of interdependent relationships between government and defence industries including contracts for equipment and services, moves of personnel between the two sectors, and policy dialogue. It is said to constitute a single powerful entity spanning capital and the state , with a vested interest in defence spending and the continuation of warfare. According to Trevor Barnes , the Cold War military-industrial complex embraced many geographers. Further reading Barnes, T. (2008), ‘Geography’s underworld: the militaryindustrial...

military–industrial complex

military–industrial complex   Quick reference

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
41 words

...–industrial complex Term coined by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to describe the powerful alliance of the military, government agencies, and corporations involved in the defence industry. Each sector has an interest, either financial or strategic, in expanding the government’s arms...

military–industrial complex

military–industrial complex   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Economics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
69 words

...militaryindustrial complex An expression used to describe the combination of a country’s armed forces and the parts of its industry related to military supply. The phrase is often used in a pejorative way in reference to the accusation that the militaryindustrial complex in major powers has been motivated by vested interests to influence policy in ways which promote international tension and thus lead to arms races or even...

Military‐Industrial Complex

Military‐Industrial Complex   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...public discussion about the militaryindustrial complex in 1960–80 , several arguments were put forward about its consequences for public policy: Military Keynesianism. Some analysts argued that the militaryindustrial complex promoted military spending as the way to use fiscal policy to manage the national economy, a military version of the macroeconomic prescriptions of John Maynard Keynes . This led to persistent and massive federal budget deficits. The Depleted Society. A related argument was that the militaryindustrial complex diverted resources from...

military-industrial complex

military-industrial complex   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
169 words

...War era, analysts point to continued high levels of U.S. defense spending as evidence of the distortions caused by the military-industrial complex. In Britain, France, Russia, China, Israel, and Brazil, MICs are associated with a burgeoning arms trade with developing countries. Defenders of the military-industrial complex point out that it is a crucial source of technological innovation (e.g., in computers and aviation) and that military expenditures help counterbalance economic downturns, both at the national and local...

Military–Industrial Complex

Military–Industrial Complex   Reference library

James Kurth

The Oxford Companion to Comparative Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
937 words

...–Industrial Complex For nations in the industrial era, national defense has meant an industrialized defense, and therefore, a defense industry. In the United States the defense industry includes corporations that produce for the civilian market as well as the military one, but its core consists of firms whose primary customers are the military services. The defense industry needs the military services; it was brought into being by military contracts during World War II, and it has been sustained ever since by military contracts. The military services, in...

Military-Industrial Complex

Military-Industrial Complex   Reference library

James Kurth

The Oxford Companion to International Relations

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
947 words

...-Industrial Complex For nations in the industrial era, national defense has meant an industrialized defense, and therefore, a defense industry. In the United States the defense industry includes corporations that produce for the civilian market as well as the military one, but its core consists of firms whose primary customers are the military services. The defense industry needs the military services; it was brought into being by military contracts during World War II, and it has been sustained ever since by military contracts. The military services,...

Military-Industrial Complex

Military-Industrial Complex   Reference library

James Kurth

The Oxford Companion to American Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012

...-Industrial Complex For nations in the industrial era, national defense has meant an industrialized defense, and therefore, a defense industry. In the United States the defense industry includes corporations that produce for the civilian market as well as the military one, but its core consists of firms whose primary customers are the military services. The defense industry needs the military services; it was brought into being by military contracts during World War II, and it has been sustained ever since by military contracts. The military services,...

Military–Industrial Complex

Military–Industrial Complex   Reference library

James Kurth, Dani Holtz, and Timothy J. Lynch

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...of the militaryindustrial complex more generally. Often members of the House and Senate armed services committees, these representatives heavily influenced military procurement. The militaryindustrial complex developed into the “iron triangle,” composed of congressional committees, military services, and military contractors. During the two decades of the greatest public discussion about the militaryindustrial complex ( 1960–1980 ), experts speculated on its consequences for public policy. Some analysts argued that the militaryindustrial complex promoted...

Military–Industrial Complex

Military–Industrial Complex   Reference library

Michael Perelman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Business, Labor, and Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...on the military remained immune from charges of anti-American socialism. This narrow vision of fiscal policy became known as military Keynesianism. Congress played a large role in appropriating money and the Democrats had the majority in Congress at the time. Eisenhower's warning about the militaryindustrial complex was a subtle, seemingly nonpartisan way of criticizing the Democrats for their promotion of spending on the military. The militaryindustrial complex also reflected changing technical conditions. Historically, the military had produced...

Military-Industrial Complex

Military-Industrial Complex   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Politics of the World (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
916 words

...-Industrial Complex . For nations in the industrial era, national defense has meant an industrialized defense and therefore a defense industry. In the United States the defense industry includes corporations that produce for the civilian market as well as the military one, but its core consists of firms whose primary customers are the military services. The defense industry needs the military services; it was brought into being by military contracts during World War II, and it has been sustained in the half-century since by military contracts. The ...

Military-Industrial Complex

Military-Industrial Complex   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Peace

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
2,495 words

...-Industrial Complex . In his farewell address in 1961 , after eight years in the White House, Dwight Eisenhower warned of the “grave implications” of the conjunction of the military establishment and the arms industry, coining the term “military-industrial complex.” In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. (Eisenhower 1960) The danger is seen in the...

military-industrial complex

military-industrial complex   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
306 words

...-industrial complex A term used to describe the alleged dependence of advanced capitalist economies on the marriage of economic and military-political objectives during the period of the Cold War. A number of sociological studies of this phenomenon were undertaken, the best-known of which is probably C. Wright Mills's The Power Elite (1956) , in which he argued that the homogeneous governing clique in post-war America represented an alliance of economic, military, and political power, and (contrary to the arguments of pluralists ) had established the...

military-industrial-scientific complex

military-industrial-scientific complex   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, History of Science
Length:
1,251 words

...the military, and British universities have never been deeply involved in military-related research. Nevertheless, about the same percentage of the GNP in Britain goes to defense R& D as in the United States, and 10 percent of all British manufacturing employees are associated with defense production. Carroll W. Pursell , Jr. , ed., The Military-Industrial Complex (1972). Benjamin Franklin Cooling , Gray Steel and Blue Water Navy: The Formative Years of America's Military-Industrial Complex (1979). Paul A. Koistinen , The Military-Industrial Complex: A...

The U.S. Politico–Military–Industrial Complex

The U.S. Politico–Military–Industrial Complex   Reference library

John A. Alic

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Military in Politics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
19,585 words
Illustration(s):
1

...and the MilitaryIndustrial Complex A five-star Army general before winning the 1952 election, Eisenhower became “the principal architect of the modern institutional Presidency” ( Hoxie, 1983 , p. 589). The PMIC took on its lasting contours during his administration and Eisenhower gave the militaryindustrial complex its name in his much-remarked January 1961 farewell address, which now reads as something of a mea culpa . For other reasons too, Eisenhower’s tenure as president marks a watershed. Over much of the 1950s the politics of military policy...

military-industrial complex

military-industrial complex   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...-industrial complex a country's military establishment and those industries producing arms or other military materials, regarded as a powerful vested interest. The term derives from a speech by US President Eisenhower in 1961...

Military-industrial complex

Military-industrial complex   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...-industrial complex . The mutually beneficial association between the defence establishment and manufacturing industry, especially in the United States. Even President Dwight E. Eisenhower was suspicious of its influence, and in his farewell address to the American people on 17 January 1961 , as he left office, he warned: [The] conjunction of an immense military establishment and large arms industry is new in the American experience … In the councils of government we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or...

military industrial complex

military industrial complex n   Reference library

Oxford Business French Dictionary: English-French

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
7 words

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