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maternal deprivation

Inadequate mothering, whether delivered by the mother or another primary carer, during the first six months of life, leading to a failure of attachment, or more generally inadequate ...

maternal deprivation

maternal deprivation n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
53 words

...maternal deprivation [mă- ter -năl] n. the condition said to result if infants are deprived of the opportunity to form a close relationship with a single parental figure, who may or may not be the child’s natural parent. It is characterized by distress and depression, leading to an inability to form lasting relationships....

maternal deprivation

maternal deprivation n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... deprivation n. Inadequate mothering, whether delivered by the mother or another primary carer, during the first six months of life, leading to a failure of attachment, or more generally inadequate mothering during the first five years of life. The concept was introduced by the English psychiatrist (Edward) John (Mostyn) Bowlby ( 1907–90 ) who argued in his book Child Care and the Growth of Love ( 1953 ) that it could seriously affect the child’s development and lead to psychological problems and juvenile delinquency. Early research tended to...

maternal deprivation

maternal deprivation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
79 words

... deprivation John Bowlby 's term for the absence of the maternal care considered necessary for later mental health. Subsequent research sought to specify child-care requirements—such as love, attachment, and stimulation—and the respective effects of their lack or distortion. Feminists denounce the idea for its ideological role in subordinating women to motherhood . Supporters of the theory hold that it is the activity of ‘mothering’ that is important, not the gender of the person who undertakes...

maternal deprivation

maternal deprivation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...maternal deprivation A syndrome of physiological and behavioral aberrations observed in infants and children, attributable to insufficient or inadequate motherly nurturing. The features include delay in reaching developmental milestones, lack of ability to relate easily to others, and antisocial conduct, some features of which are observed in primates, as well as humans. It was described and identified as a syndrome by the British psychiatrist John Bowlby ( 1907–90 ). The reality of the syndrome has been validated by recent observations of orphans in Romania...

maternal deprivation

maternal deprivation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Inadequate mothering, whether delivered by the mother or another primary carer, during the first six months of life, leading to a failure of attachment, or more generally inadequate mothering during ...
deprivation

deprivation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Loss; lacking in desired objects or aims. Within the less developed countries deprivation can be acute: water, housing, or food may be lacking. Within the developed world basic provisions may be ...
anaclitic depression

anaclitic depression  

A form of depression manifested by infants, usually triggered by sudden separation from a parent after having had a normal relationship for at least six months, characterized by crying, apprehension, ...
hospitalism

hospitalism  

A term introduced in 1945 by the Austrian psychoanalyst René A(rpad) Spitz (1887–1974) to denote the physical and psychological effects on an infant (up to 18 months old) of prolonged and total ...
infancy

infancy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In lay usage, an imprecisely defined period from birth to the age when a child is toilet trained and/or can feed, dress, and wash without the help of a parent or older sibling. Statistically the term ...
prevention

prevention  

Policies and actions to eliminate a disease or minimize its effect; to reduce the incidence and/por prevalence of disease, disability, and premature death; to reduce the prevalence of disease ...
Gabriela Mistral

Gabriela Mistral  

1889–1957)Chilean poet and diplomat who in 1945 became the first Latin-American woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature.The daughter of a schoolteacher, Gabriela Mistral herself began teaching at ...
motherhood

motherhood  

GreekWomen were deemed to have a right to marriage and children. Physicians maintained that intercourse and childbirth were necessary to female health and prescribed pregnancy to cure pathological ...
attachment

attachment  

n. 1. (in psychology) the process of developing the first close selective relationship of a child’s life, most commonly with the mother. The relationship acts to reduce anxiety in strange settings ...
British citizenship

British citizenship  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
One of three forms of citizenship introduced by the British Nationality Act 1981, which replaced citizenship of the UK and Colonies. The others were British Dependent Territories citizenship (now ...
deprivation

deprivation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Taking something away from someone or their not having something that would be expected to be present, for example, as in Bowlby’s concept of maternal deprivation . Also used in relation to whole communities—‘deprived community’—to reflect a lack of economic...

deprivation

deprivation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
577 words

... Literally the taking away of something or the state of being dispossessed, the term is loosely used for the condition of not having something, whether or not it was previously possessed, with the implication that the person in question could reasonably expect to have it. It involves loss or being excluded from things that are typically available to others. Of what precisely the individual is deprived varies, but basic welfare needs for food, housing, education, and emotional care ( see maternal deprivation ) receive much of the attention. This is...

attachment theory

attachment theory n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...John (Mostyn) Bowlby ( 1907–90 ) according to which an infant has an inborn biological need for close contact with its mother (or other main carer), a normal bond developing within the first 6 months of life through the mother's responsiveness to these needs, and maternal deprivation during this critical period having adverse effects on psychological development. See also anaclitic depression , hospitalism , love , separation anxiety , separation anxiety disorder . Compare imprinting...

anaclitic depression

anaclitic depression n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...least six months, characterized by crying, apprehension, withdrawal, anorexia , and dyssomnias . The disorder was introduced and named in 1946 by the Austrian psychoanalyst René A(rpad) Spitz ( 1887–1974 ). See also anaclitic , attachment theory , hospitalism , maternal deprivation , separation anxiety , separation anxiety disorder...

hospitalism

hospitalism n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...separation from its mother, due to hospitalization or some other similar cause. According to Spitz, the characteristics include retarded physical development and disruption of perceptual–motor skills and language. See also anaclitic depression , attachment theory , maternal deprivation , separation anxiety , separation anxiety disorder...

child care

child care   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...to some other countries, most notably the services in Scandinavia. There was resistance to their development in the UK after the Second World War, with the emphasis being on children staying at home with their mothers. This position was influenced by John Bowlby’s work on maternal deprivation ( Child Care and the Growth of Love [ 1953 ]). Feminists attacked this position because it reinforced the idea that women should be the sole carers for children and should be located primarily in the sphere of home and family, seeing this as contributing to women’s...

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