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marouflage

Term for gluing a canvas on to a wall, whether before painting it or afterwards. In French maroufle means a sticky mixture of the remains of paint left in the artist's pots, and maroufler ...

Marouflage

Marouflage   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Materials and Techniques in Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
59 words

... . Technique of fastening a canvas painting on to a solid support, such as a wall or a wooden or synthetic board. White lead in oil is the traditional adhesive for fastening painted canvas to internal walls as decoration. Reversible synthetic adhesives are used for marouflaging damaged or delicate canvases on to rigid supports as an alternative to...

marouflage

marouflage   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
47 words

... (French: maroufler , ‘to stick down’). Term for gluing a canvas permanently to a wall, whether before painting it or afterwards. The adhesive used is traditionally white lead in oil. The term is also applied to the sticking down onto canvas of oil sketches done on...

marouflage

marouflage   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
63 words

... [from the French maroufler , ‘to stick down’] Originally referred to murals on canvas attached to a wall with white lead as the adhesive. However, the term is more commonly used to describe the sticking down on to canvas of oil sketches on paper, particularly landscape sketches of the Neoclassical French School by masters such as Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes ( 1750–1819...

marouflage

marouflage   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
59 words

... Term for gluing a canvas on to a wall, whether before painting it or afterwards. In French, maroufle means a sticky mixture of the remains of paint left in the artist's pots, and maroufler may describe almost any operation that might be carried out with such a glue, for example lining one canvas with another to strengthen it....

marouflage

marouflage   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
91 words

... 1. Process of pasting/attaching a painted canvas to a wall with maroufle (adhesive made of white lead ground in oil, or a paste of rye-flour to which several heads of garlic were added). 2. Mural or ceiling finish consisting of painted decorations on a strong impermeable canvas, giving the appearance of being the real surface. It has the advantage of permitting the preparation of the decorations off site, and enabling the canvas to be peeled off and removed for cleaning/repair. JF; OED Supplement (1976), ii , 838; W.Pa (1852), v , 39–40...

marouflage

marouflage  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Term for gluing a canvas on to a wall, whether before painting it or afterwards. In French maroufle means a sticky mixture of the remains of paint left in the artist's pots, and maroufler may ...
hardboard

hardboard  

A board made from compressed wood pulp. Sometimes used as a painting surface, hardboard is also employed as a marouflage support.
Pierre Puvis de Chavannes

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(b Lyons, 14 Dec. 1824; d Paris, 24 Oct. 1898).The foremost French mural painter of the second half of the 19th century. He decorated many public buildings in France (for example, the Panthéon, the ...
mural

mural  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A painting made on or fastened to a wall, the main type of the former being fresco painting.
hardboard

hardboard   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
23 words

...A board made from compressed wood pulp. Sometimes used as a painting surface, hardboard is also employed as a marouflage ...

mural

mural   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
91 words

...in northern Europe, where the generally damper climate makes fresco unsuitable ( see water-glass painting ). For interior murals the most successful alternative has simply been to paint in oils on canvas and glue the canvas to the wall either before or after painting ( see marouflage...

Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre

Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
234 words

...He decorated many public buildings in France (for example, the Panthéon, the Sorbonne, and the Hôtel de Ville, all in Paris) and also Boston Public Library ( Abbey and Sargent did murals here too). His paintings were done on canvas and then affixed to the walls ( see marouflage ), but their pale colours imitated the effect of fresco . He had only modest success early in his career (when a private income enabled him to work for little payment), but he went on to achieve an enormous reputation, and he was respected even by artists of very different...

Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre

Puvis de Chavannes, Pierre   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
232 words

...He decorated many public buildings in France (for example, the Panthéon, the Sorbonne, and the Hôtel de Ville, all in Paris) and also Boston Public Library ( Abbey and Sargent did murals here too). His paintings were done on canvas and then affixed to the walls ( see marouflage ), but their pale colours imitated the effect of fresco . He had only modest success early in his career (when a private income enabled him to work for little payment), but he went on to achieve an enormous reputation, and he was respected even by artists of very different...

mural painting

mural painting   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
413 words

...C19 throughout the West, notably in didactic and historical painting closely associated with Revivalist architectural movements (e.g. the Glyptothek , Munich, and the Palace of Westminster, London). For much mural painting the technique of fresco was employed, but in France marouflage was commonly used. In England, as the progress of the Gothic Revival demanded more and more historical research and scholarly application, whole interiors were coloured (e.g. Holy Innocents, Highnam, Glos. ( 1850–71 ), by Thomas Gambier Parry ( 1816–88 ), carried out in...

fresco

fresco   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
576 words

... was the last in the line of great Italian painters who used it. It was revived in the 19th century, notably by German painters such as the Nazarenes and Cornelius , but some notable decorators, such as Delacroix and Puvis de Chavannes , preferred to use the method of marouflage . In the 20th century the most famous exponents of fresco were the Mexican muralists Orozco , Rivera , and Siqueiros...

fresco

fresco   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Art (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
864 words

...the line of great Italian painters who used it. The medium was revived in the 19th century, notably by German painters such as the Nazarenes and Cornelius , but some leading decorators of the time, such as Delacroix and Puvis de Chavannes , preferred to use the method of marouflage . In the 20th century the greatest exponents of fresco were the Mexican muralists Orozco , Rivera , and Siqueiros...

Wall painting

Wall painting   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Materials and Techniques in Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
7,407 words
Illustration(s):
2

...and to allow for the textural effects favoured during the period the intonaco layer was roughened. The pigments were applied more thickly and unevenly, perhaps sometimes with the addition of lime to increase the opacity of the colours. In France a type of secco work known as marouflage was preferred. It involved painting in oil on canvas that was glued to the wall using an adhesive cement made of resin and wax or white lead in oil. In the late 18th century the monumental style and complex perspectives of Baroque mural painting fell out of favour. Some...

Oil painting

Oil painting   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Materials and Techniques in Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
4,178 words

...although such painters as Giambattista Tiepolo ( 1696–1770 ) and Thomas Gainsborough ( 1727–88 ) chose mushroom pink. In northern Europe, many wall paintings still continued to be executed in oil, occasionally combined with other techniques and materials, as with French marouflage, in which an oil painting on canvas is pasted on to a wall. Paints prepared by colour merchants were at first packaged in pieces of animal, usually pig bladder. This was wasteful of expensive pigment as the paint dried out rapidly, and some painters continued to grind and mix...

Canvas

Canvas   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Materials and Techniques in Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
4,425 words

...likely to exist in galleries or museums. In less favourable circumstances, some means of preventing the surrounding atmosphere from gaining access to the back of the canvas, where it is most vulnerable, is usually beneficial. Mounting canvas on panel, not permanently as in the ‘marouflage’ technique where it is glued down, but with the panel acting merely as a stretcher, or alternatively using a blind stretcher greatly reduces the effects of temperature and humidity changes on the canvas. It will also protect against accidental damage to the canvas from the...

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