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manor

Subject: History

[MC] The basic social, political, and economic unit of the manorial system, found in parts of northern Europe, Britain especially, from the 9th century ad. At its heart was a ...

manor

manor   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
118 words

... [MC] The basic social, political, and economic unit of the manorial system, found in parts of northern Europe, Britain especially, from the 9th century ad . At its heart was a self‐sufficient landed estate, or fief, that was under the control of a lord who enjoyed a variety of rights over it and the peasants (serfs) who worked on it. The lord of the manor exercised his rights through a manor court. Some of the tenants also owed a variety of dues and/or labour services on the demesne depending on their tenure. A manor could be part of, co‐extensive with, or...

manor

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The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
488 words

..., showed that there was no such thing as the ‘typical manor’. Manors were ‘deformed’ or ‘imperfectly formed’, both in relation to the village, and internally in their components. He demonstrated the great diversity of manors at the time of the Hundred Rolls ( 1279 ), when manors were just as untidy as they had been in 1086 . Indeed, small manors were more numerous. In the former Danelaw , coincidence between manor and township , parish , or village was extremely rare. See also sub‐manor . A manor may be defined as a territorial unit that was originally...

manor

manor   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
161 words

... . By the time that the Domesday Book was compiled the manorial system was established throughout most of England. It was subsequently imposed on other parts of the British Isles that came under Norman rule. A manor may be defined as a territorial unit that was originally held by feudal tenure , by a landlord who was not necessarily noble, and who himself was a tenant either of the Crown or of a mesne lord who held land directly of the Crown. In the Middle Ages the manor was an economic unit, which included the demesne which the lord farmed himself...

Manor

Manor   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... (Old French manoir , from Latin manere , ‘to remain’) A word introduced after the Norman Conquest and used of a dwelling of a man of substance but not necessarily a large holding. It ultimately came to denote the self-contained estate in which the demesne (domain) land was worked for the lord’s private benefit, the remainder being worked by free and unfree tenants, villeins , who were subject to the court baron . See also common ; open-field system ; weekwork . Lord of the manor See under lord...

manor

manor   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
416 words

...Munster. This enormous area was divided into seven ‘capital’ manors—Nenagh, Caherconlish, Dunkerrin, Thurles, Gowran, Tullow, and Arklow—each with its castle and lands reserved as the lord's demesne. The territory of each capital manor was in turn divided into smaller manors (fiefs)—perhaps 3,000 to 5,000 acres on average—held by tenants (knights) owing military service. At this primary level the manor was a tenurial structure to provide the means to defend and retain a recent conquest. The manor was also the institutional means of exploiting the agriculture...

manor

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The smallest area of land held in the Middle Ages by a feudal lord, with its own court for minor offences. It usually consisted of a village, the lord’s holding ( demesne ), and open fields farmed on the three-field system. See Z. Razi and R. Smith...

manor house

manor house   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
40 words

... house [MC] The main residence of the lord of the manor , typically comprising a substantial house, together with associated agricultural buildings and administrative offices. In England the manor house was often located near the main church serving the manor...

manor house

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... house The house which is the main administrative centre of a country estate or manor. The houses are sometimes...

sub-manor

sub-manor   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
39 words

...manor . The lords of large medieval lordships sometimes granted favoured retainers the right to hold manorial courts for small districts within their jurisdiction. In time, these sub-manors usually became completely independent, with their own manor houses, deer parks ,...

sub‐manor

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The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
39 words

...manor The lords of large medieval lordships sometimes granted favoured retainers the right to hold manorial courts for small districts within their jurisdiction. In time, these sub‐manors usually became completely independent, with their own manor houses, deer parks ,...

Guestwick Manor

Guestwick Manor   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Manor , home of Earl De Guest and his spinster sister Lady Julia . SHA NCS Nelson C....

manor-house

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A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
48 words

...-house House in a district in medieval England over which the Court of the Lord of the Manor had authority, or on the land belonging to that nobleman: it was usually unfortified, of medium size, and architecturally unpretentious. O.Cook & E.Smith ( 1983 ) ; Wood ( 1965...

manor houses

manor houses   Reference library

J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
640 words

... houses were the habitat of the gentry, the headquarters of the squire. In medieval England they were both governmental and economic units. The lord of the manor dispensed justice through his court and could call upon the villagers for labour and financial assistance. It is not clear to what extent Roman villas fulfilled these functions or how widespread the development was in Saxon times. There was always considerable diversity. Some wealthy men owned many manors, others but one: some villages had no resident lord of the manor, others had two. Manors and...

manor house

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The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
499 words

... house The medieval manor house ranged considerably in size, for manors were many and varied. It has been estimated that there may have been between 25 000 and 50 000 manor houses, or ‘halls’ as they were called in East Anglia and north of the Trent. The most common term in Kent is ‘court’. Manor houses were often surrounded by moats , with the parish church sited alongside; see, for example, Great Chalfield (Wiltshire) ( see historic churches ). Many are timber‐framed , but some of the earliest examples, dating from the late 12th century, are of...

moated manor

moated manor   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
76 words

...manor ( moated farmstead ) [MC] A style of small settlement, generally of high status, comprising a manor or substantial farmstead set on an island bounded by a water‐filled moat. This tradition developed in many parts of northwest Europe in the 12th century ad , perhaps copying the use of moats on earlier castles. Great numbers have been defined in England, Ireland, and northern France, the peak of moat building being between ad 1250 and 1350...

Manor Cross

Manor Cross   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... Cross , grim, dark house nine miles (14 km) from the city of Brotherton, the family residence of the Marquis of Brotherton. The old Marchioness, her daughters, and second son ( Lord George Germain ) live there until turned out by the Marquis. Lady George is brought to this house as a bride. IHP MG Mickie...

Scroope Manor

Scroope Manor   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Manor , Dorset residence of the earls of Scroope, an Elizabethan building whose old-fashioned quietude proclaims the 12th Earl's conservatism and his servants' and tenants' good fortune. ‘Marlbro' school’, attached to the estate, suggests that Trollope modelled this locale on the Seymours' Wiltshire mansion, site of the actual College. EE AWJ Anthony...

Swainston Manor

Swainston Manor   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literary Britain & Ireland (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Literature, Society and culture
Length:
78 words

...Manor Isle of Wight 18th‐c. house (burnt in a 1941 air raid; now a hotel) off the B3401, with a 13th‐c. oratory, home of Sir John Simeon . Tennyson often came over from Farringford (6 m. W) and Maud ( 1855 ) evolved from a conversation the two men had here and the poem is set in the garden with the cedars. Tennyson called Sir John ‘the prince of courtesy’ in the lines ‘Swainston’, which he wrote after his...

Ferndean Manor

Ferndean Manor   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
101 words

...Ferndean Manor is an old house with dank, green walls, deep within a gloomy wood, about 30 miles from Thornfield Hall , in Jane Eyre . Its unhealthy situation had deterred Rochester from hiding his mad wife there, but after he was maimed in the fire at Thornfield, he himself lived in it. Jane saw him straining to see the sky above the amphitheatre of trees. In the fields beyond the wood Jane agreed to marry him. Ruined Wycoller Hall , in a deep wooded valley about 9 miles from Haworth, resembles Ferndean in its situation and antiquity, not in its...

Grassdale Manor

Grassdale Manor   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Grassdale Manor , the residence of Mr Arthur Huntingdon and Helen Huntingdon after their marriage in Tenant . Described by Gilbert Markham as a ‘stately mansion in the midst of its expansive grounds’ (ch. 52), it is the setting for many of the painful events which force Helen to flee her husband. After his death, Helen does not return to Grassdale, except when necessary. It later becomes the residence of her son, Arthur Huntingdon...

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