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magnetoencephalography

A method of brain imaging through the recording of magnetic fields induced by the electrical activity of brain cells. MEG abbrev. [From Greek magnetis (lithos) magnesian (stone) + ...

magnetoencephalography

magnetoencephalography   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...magnetoencephalography Measurement of the weak magnetic signals generated by electrical activity in the brain....

magnetoencephalography

magnetoencephalography n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n. A method of brain imaging through the recording of magnetic fields induced by the electrical activity of brain cells. MEG abbrev. [From Greek magnetis ( lithos ) magnesian (stone) + enkephalos the brain, from en in + kephale the head + graphein to...

magnetoencephalography

magnetoencephalography   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... ( MEG ) A form of functional neuroimaging that uses very sensitive magnetometers to measure magnetic fields that occur naturally in the brain. Because the magnetic field of the brain is very weak compared to the magnetic noise present in the environment, all such measurements are taken in a magnetically shielded room . Uses of MEG include research into brain activity and certain clinical assessments before brain surgery is performed. It can observe much shorter and better localized brain activity events than is possible with ...

magnetoencephalography

magnetoencephalography   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,398 words

... Alongside *electroencephalography ( EEG ), magnetoencephalography ( MEG ) completes the electromagnetic signature of electric neural activity recorded from the scalp. Biomagnetic fields produced by the brain's ongoing activity are minute, typically ranging from 10 to 100 fT (1 fT = 10−15 of a tesla); about 1 billion times smaller than the Earth's static magnetic field that makes the needle of a compass point north. Such a tiny scale of measurement obviously makes substantial technological demands ( Hämäläinen et al. 1993 ). 1. ...

Healthy and Pathological Neurocognitive Aging: Spectral and Functional Connectivity Analyses Using Magnetoencephalography

Healthy and Pathological Neurocognitive Aging: Spectral and Functional Connectivity Analyses Using Magnetoencephalography   Reference library

Gianluca Susi, Jaisalmer de Frutos-Lucas, Guiomar Niso, Su Miao Ye-Chen, Luis Antón Toro, Brenda Nadia Chino Vilca, and Fernando Maestú

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Psychology and Aging

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology
Length:
11,454 words
Illustration(s):
4

...from the sensors with the magnetic resonance imaging of the subject or by using proper existing structural templates. Magnetoencephalography allows us to study brain activity both in resting state and during the execution of cognitive tasks (see Appendix 1 ). Magnetoencephalography Pros and Cons. On the one hand, Magnetoencephalography offers plenty of advantages with respect to other functional imaging methods. Magnetoencephalography measures neuronal activity directly, not relying on vascular responses like other in vivo functional neuroimaging...

magnetoencephalography

magnetoencephalography  

A method of brain imaging through the recording of magnetic fields induced by the electrical activity of brain cells. MEG abbrev. [From Greek magnetis (lithos) magnesian (stone) + enkephalos the ...
brain imaging

brain imaging  

Any of several techniques for imaging or visualizing the structure or function of the brain, including electroencephalography or EEG, computed tomography or CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging or ...
functional brain imaging

functional brain imaging  

Functional brain imaging refers to a group of technologies developed in the last quarter of the 20th century that allow the non‐invasive measurement of human brain activity. These technologies have ...
online measures of non-conscious processing

online measures of non-conscious processing  

An online measurement is one that is obtained in real time while the subject is engaged in a behaviour. The defining feature of an online measure is that the data ...
gamma oscillations

gamma oscillations  

Neural signals in the gamma frequency range (≥30 Hz) have recently received considerable attention in neuroscience. Although the phenomenon of fast neuronal oscillations had been described already 50 ...
single-cell studies: monkey

single-cell studies: monkey  

Current understanding of the physiological basis of consciousness is still rudimentary. To fill that gap, researchers look for neuronal events that could yield conscious experiences in the brain of ...
correlates of consciousness, computational

correlates of consciousness, computational  

The expression ‘computational correlate of consciousness’ was first used by Mathis and Mozer (1995), who, taking a computational approach to the problem of consciousness, asked ‘What conditions must ...
phantom limb

phantom limb  

An illusory sensation, experienced by an amputee, of the limb still being attached to the body, even when all sensory nerve fibres associated with the limb have been removed. It is experienced by ...
brain

brain  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. the enlarged and highly developed mass of nervous tissue that forms the upper end of the central nervous system (see illustration). The average adult human brain weighs about 1400 g (approximately ...
magnetically shielded room

magnetically shielded room   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...room ( MSR ) A room lined with materials, such as aluminium or alloys of nickel and iron, that prevent magnetic fields from entering or leaving its interior. Such rooms are required for the use of highly sensitive magnetic sensors in medical imaging. See also magnetoencephalography . ...

brain imaging

brain imaging n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...imaging n. Any of several techniques for imaging or visualizing the structure or function of the brain, including electroencephalography or EEG , computed tomography or CT scans , magnetic resonance imaging or MRI , magnetoencephalography , positron emission tomography or PET scans , and single photon emission computed tomography or SPECT scans . See also angiogram , nuclear magnetic resonance , radioisotope scan , regional cerebral blood flow , ultrasound...

Psycholinguistics

Psycholinguistics   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...to neurology have led to increased use of neuro-linguistic methods in psycholinguistics including: brain imaging by positron emission tomography (PET); functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); event-related potentials (ERPs) in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG); and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Brain imaging techniques vary in their spatial and temporal resolutions (fMRI has a resolution of a few thousand neurons per pixel, and ERP has millisecond accuracy). Increasingly, psycholinguistics methods will include...

phantom limb

phantom limb   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,255 words

...skin, higher brain centres still continue to interpret the signals as arising from the hand. Changes in somatosensory cortex topography — occurring over distances of 2–3 cm — have also been shown in the same patients using functional brain imaging techniques — especially magnetoencephalography (MEG); this allows researchers to correlate perceptual phenomena described by the patient (such as referred sensations) with the anatomical sites of activity. These demonstrations of ‘plasticity’ in the adult brain can also be seen in monkeys in which one arm has been...

online measures of non‐conscious processing

online measures of non‐conscious processing   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,666 words

...Various neuroimaging techniques can provide online measurements of neural processing under non‐conscious conditions. These techniques include functional magnetic resonance imaging ( fMRI ), positron emission tomography ( PET ), *electroencephalography ( EEG ), and *magnetoencephalography ( MEG ). Psychophysiological techniques, such as the skin conductance response ( SCR ), can also be utilized to examine non‐conscious processes. The SCR is measured by placing electrodes on the palm of the hand. Minuscule changes in sweat gland activity can be detected...

phantom limbs

phantom limbs   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,987 words
Illustration(s):
3

...to the amputation. This is probably caused by cross‐activation of the hand area of cortex by afferents from the upper arm which normally project only to the upper arm region of cortex ( Ramachandran and Hirstein 1998 ). These conjectures were confirmed by using *magnetoencephalography ( MEG ), a non‐invasive brain imaging technique (Fig. P3). The map of referred sensations is modality specific. Warmth on the face elicits warmth in the phantom thumb; cold and vibration elicit cold and vibration. This shows that the remapping is modality specific, with...

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