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ligature

Deriving from a form of the Latin ligare (‘to bind’), the term ‘ligature’ in palaeography means a stroke connecting two letters: for instance, the raised curve or loop which may ...

ligature

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The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... A written or (especially) printed character combining two letters in one, e.g. 〈æ〉,...

ligature

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A Dictionary of Forensic Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Science and technology, Law
Length:
94 words

... The object used to cause strangulation in a murder, suicide, or accidental death. Ligatures are often ropes or other cords but can be anything that will encompass the neck and to which pressure can be applied. Towels, scarves, belts, sheets, and phone cord have all been used as ligatures and the knots used to tie or secure them can become critical evidence. Ligatures can also produce distinctive impressions on the neck that can be physically matched to the ligature. A ligature is also any cording that is used to bind a...

Ligature

Ligature   Reference library

Alice-Mary Talbot and Alexander Kazhdan

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
101 words
Illustration(s):
1

... , term used in palaeography and epigraphy . It describes the linking together of letters to save space and time. Gardthausen ( Palaeographie 2:53) classifies ligatures into primary, secondary, and tertiary examples. In primary ligatures, letters are combined but preserve their essential elements; in secondary ligatures two letters are united so that they share a common element; in tertiary ligatures three letters are joined. In epigraphy there are examples of eight letters combined together. Occurring relatively infrequently in uncial MSS, ...

ligature

ligature   Reference library

Anthony Pryer

The Oxford Companion to Music

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
242 words
Illustration(s):
1

...ligature (from Lat. ligare , ‘to bind’). A note form representing two or more notes. The use of ligatures was common in the medieval period, but the advent of music printing and other factors led to their demise in about 1600 . Ligatures originated in neumatic plainchant notation ( see notation (1) ), where a single ligature contained a group of notes sung to just one syllable of text. At about the beginning of the 13th century, set ways of combining ligatures were established so as to indicate clearly the rhythmic patterns of the music. These set...

Ligature

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The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Ligature . 1. A term in printing for two or more joined letters cast in the same piece of type: ae in Caesar ; fl in florin ; ffi in office . Early typefaces had many ligatures, imitating connected letters in handwriting, but few are retained in contemporary English printed alphabets. Vowel ligatures such as ae are now commonly replaced by open ae , even when transcribing latin , Latinized greek , and old english : Caesar not Caesar ; Aelfric not AElfric . 2. In phonetics , a mark like the slur in musical notation placed over or under...

ligature

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A Dictionary of Nursing (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
31 words

... [ lig -ă-cher] n. any material – for example, nylon, vicryl, or wire – that is tied firmly round a blood vessel or duct to prevent bleeding, the passage of materials,...

ligature

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A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
128 words

... Deriving from a form of the Latin ligare (‘to bind’), the term ‘ligature’ in palaeography means a stroke connecting two letters: for instance, the raised curve or loop which may join together st or fl in early modern scribal manuscripts. In printing, a ligature may be cast in one piece to combine more than two letters: for instance ffi . The term is also sometimes used to denote forms in which two letters are combined in modified shape as a digraph, such as æ and œ . Also, in the notation of music from about the thirteenth to sixteenth...

Ligature

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Albert R. Rice

The Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Music
Length:
160 words

...Ligature . Metal band with two screws by which the reed of a clarinet or saxophone is secured to its mouthpiece. It replaces the earlier method of binding the reed with a waxed thread or twisted cord, still regarded as the correct method in Germany. The screw ligature was introduced by Iwan Müller in his Gamme pour la nouvelle clarinette (Bonn, c 1812) along with his revolutionary 13-key clarinet. In his Méthode pour la nouvelle clarinette & clarinette-alto (Paris, c 1821), Müller reasoned that compared to cord binding, a metal ligature looked more...

ligature

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Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
40 words

... n. any material – for example, nylon, vicryl, or wire – that is tied firmly round a blood vessel to stop it bleeding or around the base of a structure (such as the pedicle of a growth) to constrict...

ligature

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The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
100 words

... [Lat. ligare , ‘to bind’] Two or more letters joined together (e.g. æ , fl ). In writing these are connected by, or share, a *stroke , which can save time. In type, letters are combined at *punch -making, leading to a single punch, *matrix , and casting as one piece. Alternatively, separate punches are combined (as when adding *accents to letters), or separate matrices are placed side by side in the *mould , for casting as a single piece. Ligature s, eliminating unsightly spaces and saving space, were frequent in *incunabula , but quickly...

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A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... 1. Reinforcement binders fixed around the main bars of reinforcement to form a cage. See stirrup . 2. Slang term used to describe a wire, band, or other device that can close something off, for instance, restrict or close the movement of fluid along a pipe, like a tourniquet...

ligature

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The Oxford Dictionary of Music (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Music
Length:
100 words

... 1. The sign which in early notation (13th–16th cent.) combines several notes into one symbol: 2. The slur that in modern notation of vocal music shows that the 2 or more notes it affects are to be fitted to the same syllable, or, in instr music, that the notes are to be phrased together. 3. The tie or bind—a use of the word better avoided as unnecessary and confusing. 4. The adjustable metal band which in instr of the cl family secures the reed to the mouthpiece. Some clarinettists use string ligature. See curved line, various uses of...

ligature

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A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
76 words

...ligature n. ( v. ligate ) 1. A wire used to secure the archwire into the archwire slot of a bracket on a fixed orthodontic appliance ; unlike elastomeric modules , they can be tightened to maximize the contact between the wire and the bracket. 2. A cord or thread tied around a tooth to hold a dental dam in place. 3. A cord, wire, or thread used to tie a blood...

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A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
22 words

... A rope or band of material used to constrict part of the body. Most often seen round the neck causing...

ligature

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Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... , in printing, is a pair of letters printed in a joined form, e.g. æ . See digraph...

ligature

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
117 words

... • botcher , gotcha, top-notcher, watcher, wotcha • imposture , posture • firewatcher • birdwatcher • debaucher , scorcher, torture • Boucher , voucher • cloture , encroacher, poacher, reproacher • jointure • moisture • cachucha , future, moocher, smoocher, suture • butcher • kuccha , scutcher, toucher • structure • culture , vulture • conjuncture , juncture, puncture • rupture • sculpture • viniculture • agriculture • sericulture • arboriculture • pisciculture • horticulture • silviculture • subculture • counterculture • ...

ligature

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Pocket Oxford Spanish Dictionary: English-Spanish (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
7 words
ligature

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Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
151 words
ligature

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New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
133 words
ligature

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The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
69 words

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