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land tenure

Land could be held in a number of ways. Theoretically all land was owned ultimately by the crown, but most of it has been ‘sold’ to private individuals or public ...

land tenure

land tenure  

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference

... tenure The system of laws or customs that governs how people use and inhabit the land. Land tenure has been a major subject of anthropological research because it is frequently crucial to the organization of nonindustrialized societies and is often different from the pattern of public and private ownership established in the industrialized West. See also land reform...

land tenure

land tenure   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
64 words

... tenure The legal or customary relationship of people to land, defining the rights and responsibilities of those involved. There are many diverse forms of tenure, in the past and in the present. Private ownership vests exclusive rights to land and its resources in an individual or corporate body. Communal ownership involves shared rights within a community ( see tragedy of the commons...

land tenure

land tenure   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... tenure The nature of access to land use. Common forms of land tenure are owner-occupied farms, and tenancies which basically involve payment (in the form of labour, cash, or share-cropping ) to the landlord from the tenant. A plantation is owned by an institution and uses paid labour. Collectives may own land together and work together, sharing any profits. Under traditional communal land tenure systems in Ghana, the direct descendants of a landholder inherit their rights without losing them to a larger group ( Asbere (1994) J. Black Stud. 24, 3 )....

Land Tenure

Land Tenure   Reference library

Nicholas S. Hopkins

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Women

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
1,235 words

... Tenure . Land tenure in the Islamic world is heavily affected by political factors. The three main influences on land tenure are the rules and choices imposed by political elites, Islamic law, and customary provisions, including pre-Islamic systems and adaptations to specific environments. Land tenure includes formal rules of ownership, rules guiding access to land for non-owners, and the distribution of landholdings according to these rules. The liberalization of land tenure in the nineteenth century allowed individual property holdings in land. It was...

land tenure

land tenure   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
537 words

... tenure A complex of traditions, rights, and responsibilities of ownership, transference, and land use. Since the economic life of Europe was dominated by agriculture, on which the aristocracy built their power and privileges, *labour and wealth were linked to the way the land was settled and manipulated. Evidence for land tenure is found in wills, leases, and *estate and manorial documents. Forms of land tenure (Latin, tenura ) were complex and are described by the degree of autonomy offered to the farmer, including ‘owner occupation’ ( mansus ),...

land tenure

land tenure   Reference library

John Beckett

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
330 words

... tenure . Land could be held in a number of ways. Theoretically all land was owned ultimately by the crown, but most of it has been ‘sold’ to private individuals or public bodies. Since the disappearance of feudal tenure in the Middle Ages, most land has been ‘let’ to tenants, in a variety of different forms. Of these the best known is ‘rack rent’, in which land and buildings are let by the owner to a tenant for what is agreed by both parties to be a fair economic rent, reflecting its real value. However, this has been universal in England only since the...

land tenure

land tenure   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
2,021 words

...of land within the kindred. There were various forms of temporary tenure of land. One was enjoyed by the banchomarbae , ‘the female heir’. She was someone who had inherited land in default of brothers. (Women could, of course, own acquired land outright and regularly inherited moveable property.) The banchomarbae had possession of the inheritance for her lifetime. So far she was no different from any kinsman. What distinguished her case and made her possession seem more temporary than the norm was that she could not transmit her land to her sons,...

Land Tenure

Land Tenure   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
2,881 words

...years include the liberalization of land tenure in the nineteenth century to allow for individual property in land, and the wave of land reforms that followed the Egyptian land reform of 1952 . Land tenure in the Middle East is now moving toward more private land ownership and the dismantling of the systems set up under government land reform. Islamic Land Law. In many traditional Islamic systems it was considered that the state (or the ruler), as the representative of the Islamic community, was the ultimate owner of the land. This right was predicated on...

Land Tenure

Land Tenure   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
2,851 words

...Land Tenure . Land tenure refers to the bundle of rights and responsibilities under which land is held, used, transferred, and succeeded. The meaning of the term varies with context. It is used to refer to land tenure prescribed by statutory or common law, customary land tenure, and observed land tenure practices in a particular historical context. Land tenure arrangements vary enormously across urban and rural areas primarily because of the use of land for agriculture in rural areas and for residences and businesses in urban areas. Economic historians have...

land tenure

land tenure   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... tenure The right to own land, or to occupy and use exclusively a particular piece of land...

land tenure

land tenure   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Cultural Anthropology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Anthropology
Length:
143 words

...land tenure The social relationships and property rights associated with access to land. Because people– land relationships are so central to a range of socio-cultural matters—especially subsistence , legal systems, kinship , social status , power , and religion —understanding the diverse cross-cultural patterns and rules of tenure has been an important disciplinary focus. Anthropologists typically recognize distinctions between rights of use (who can access it and under what conditions); rights of transfer (to whom and how possession changes); and...

land tenure, Roman

land tenure, Roman   Reference library

Peter Sarris

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...extra commercium (property which could be neither bought nor sold). Roman land tenure as legally defined by emperors and jurists in Late Antiquity thus provided a highly sophisticated conceptual framework with which to describe relations of ownership and non-ownership with respect to land, Inevitably, however, at the provincial grassroots of Late Roman society, many of the legal niceties were either sweated away or were subsumed within pre-existing regional traditions of land tenure. This dialectical relationship between codified law and local custom would...

land tenure, post-Roman

land tenure, post-Roman   Reference library

Sam Turner

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...provided another type of grant, usually on condition that the land returned to the donor after a limited term (often three lives, i.e. those of the beneficiary and two heirs). Such grants frequently led to disputes and the fragmentation of earlier estates when occupiers succeeded in retaining their land. Sam Turner R. Faith , The English Peasantry and the Growth of Lordship (1997). E. John , Land Tenure in Early England (1960). S. Smith , Land and Book: Literature and Land Tenure in Anglo-Saxon England (2012). P. Wormald , Bede and the Conversion...

Property and Land Tenure

Property and Land Tenure   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
2,254 words

...and demographic changes following the Spanish conquest deeply affected the system of land tenure. As the pre-Hispanic political structures were abolished, types of landholding not corresponding to Spanish law were rapidly transformed. Thus, office land appeared as private property of the last officeholder or his family, and the same may have happened in some regions with the calpullalli . Predominantly in the first half of the sixteenth century, private land was also created by allotments made by the colonial authorities to landless native commoners....

Land lease and tenure auctions

Land lease and tenure auctions   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... lease and tenure auctions . There are a number of surviving customs pertaining to the letting of land, each designed to maximize fairness within the constraints of local conditions, but each has accrued its own methods and traditions which seem quaint and odd to modern eyes. The most common is by candle auction, but the following are examples of other methods. At Congresbury (Somerset), after four acres were let ‘by inch of candle’ on the Saturday before Old Midsummer Day, two pieces of common land, called East and West Dolemoors, were divided into acres...

land tenure

land tenure  

Land could be held in a number of ways. Theoretically all land was owned ultimately by the crown, but most of it has been ‘sold’ to private individuals or public ...
Property and Land Tenure

Property and Land Tenure  

In ancient Mesoamerican cultures, the concept of property obviously was different from Western understanding. This was due, among other factors, to the absence of money as a medium with ...
The Twentieth Century

The Twentieth Century   Quick reference

Brian M. Short

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,083 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of tenure, the extent of freehold ownership , leasehold and copyhold details , rents, and lengths of tenure. There is much information on housing. The numbers and uses of rooms, house rents, sanitation and water supply, information on building materials, and details of stabling, pigsties, and other buildings, repair and general condition, etc. should all be present, facilitating studies of living conditions prior to 1914 for all classes. Studies can also be made of land use in urban and rural areas, and it is sometimes possible to examine rural land use...

Agricultural History

Agricultural History   Quick reference

David Hey

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
4,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...bits and pieces of land and were badly provided for in winter. On mixed farms stock fed upon the stubble of arable crops and whatever land could be spared for grazing. In those parts of the country where rearing was the speciality, large tracts of land had to be set aside to provide fodder. The next two centuries saw great improvements as land was earmarked for grazing, fertilized regularly, ploughed, and sown with clovers , for both summer and winter feeding. The same period saw a much greater use of convertible husbandry, in which land that had previously...

Family History

Family History   Quick reference

Anthony Camp

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,329 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...evidence and drew conclusions from it, citing contemporary record evidence for every statement made. Peter le Neve ( 1661–1729 ), Norroy King of Arms, showed that by the end of the century the pedigrees of some knights needed something more than a knowledge of the records of land tenure. He therefore began to use parish registers. Church monuments had always been used, but half a century later the importance of those in churchyards for humbler families was also recognized. Two Garter Kings of Arms, Ralph Bigland ( 1711–84 ) and Sir Isaac Heard ( 1730–1822...

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