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Overview

kinship

A group of people who are genetically closely related by ties of blood and marriage or its equivalent, i.e., parents and children, siblings, cousins, aunts, and uncles.

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... Family relationships: connection by blood, marriage, or adoption. Megoran (2006) Pol. Geog. 25, 622 shows that kinship networks in Uzbekistan/Kyrgyzstan form an integral part of the individual’s meaning and orientation in the...

kinship

kinship ([Ge])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
41 words

... [Ge] In anthropology, relationships between people that are based on real or imagined descent or, sometimes, on marriage. Kinship ties impose mutual obligations on all members of a kin group; these ties were at the core of most prehistoric...

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
97 words

... Greek interest in genealogy is securely attested. And Greeks of the Classical and Hellenistic periods were much interested in the idea of kinship between peoples or cities, and they based political claims and requests on such real, exaggerated, or imagined kinship‐ties. The Romans also defined themselves in such terms; see aeneas . All this might seem to encourage generalization about kinship in the ancient world, but it may be safer to pursue particular aspects. See adoption ; family, roman ; founders of cities ; genealogy ; genos ; gens ; ...

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...kinship A group of people who are genetically closely related by ties of blood and marriage or its equivalent; i.e., parents and children, siblings, cousins, aunts, and uncles. ...

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
81 words

... A family relationship, through blood, marriage, or adoption, or other close ties or bonds. Kinship is considered a fundamental element of society, a form of social organization centred on family or very close bonds of association. Its importance is waning to a degree in Western societies with the demise of subsistence living and social care becoming less reliant on family supports, but in other parts of the world kinship retains its salience underpinning care, units of production, and political...

kinship

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A Dictionary of Gender Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology, Politics
Length:
89 words

...kinship The relationship between people, traditionally associated with blood or genetic relationships or descent within family formations, but also metaphorically understood as the feeling of affinity with another person. Advances in biotechnology, the rise of more divergent family forms such as serial stepfamilies, of children conceived through the use of assisted reproduction, and of queer which has emphasized the notion of the ‘rainbow family’, led to significant interest among gender scholars from the 1990s onwards in revisioning kinship, with much less...

kinship

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The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
589 words

... T. M. Charles‐Edwards , Early Irish and Welsh Kinship ( 1993 ), examines the subject in depth for the earliest periods. The value of kinship bonds in early modern England has been the subject of much debate, which is summarized in David Cressy , ‘Kinship and Kinship Interaction in Early Modern England’, Past and Present , 113 ( 1986 ). Little work has been done on other parts of Britain during the early modern period, but it is clear from studies of communities in later centuries that kinship ties were strongest in the remoter parts of Wales, Ireland,...

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
890 words

... Kinship is one of the main organizing principles of human society, and kinship systems have been extensively studied by social anthropologists , for whom they are of particular importance because of their primacy in non-state societies. Kinship systems establish relationships between individuals and groups on the model of biological relationships between parents and children, between siblings, and between marital partners. Relationships established by marriage , which form alliances between groups of persons related by blood (or consanguineous ties),...

Kinship

Kinship   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Regional and National History, Philosophy
Length:
1,263 words

...of kinship and its terminology has interested anthropologists since the nineteenth century, when the American anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan developed his theory of kinship. Morgan held that kinship terminology used in nonliterate societies reflected a low level of culture and that the terminology common in civilized societies indicated an advanced stage of development. This theory was abandoned when the discovery was made that the limited number of kinship systems in use are found among both technologically simple and advanced peoples. Kinship is...

kinship

kinship   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
510 words

... The network of social relationships that structure human reproduction, composed of the roles, rules, and forms of behavior that define relations by blood and marriage. Kinship has been the chief and most enduring subject of anthropology , dating back as far as Lewis Henry Morgan 's Systems of Consanguinity and Affinity ( 1870 ). In part, this is due to the preeminence of kin relationships in the preindustrial societies that have traditionally interested anthropologists most. It is also due to the long-standing assumption that the family is the basis...

Kinship

Kinship   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... . A system of kinship is a universal feature in human societies, but because the European kinship system is for us self-evident, it may be difficult for us to understand that people living in other times and cultures may have a different understanding of kinship and a different attitude toward their relatives. The ancient Egyptians, for example, had no word for “parents,” but this does not mean that they had no concept of parents. The designation and categorization of relatives are culturally coined. Moreover, in most cultures there are differences...

Kinship

Kinship   Reference library

Tovah Bender

The Oxford Encyclopedia Women in World History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History
Length:
5,331 words

... . Kinship is a tie of emotion and obligation, beyond friendship, that connects individuals to one another and to a larger entity, such as a family, lineage, or clan. Kinship ties are generally based on biological relations—often thought of as shared blood—or sexual relations—usually marriage—but kinship can bring together a wide variety of biologically related and unrelated people. This diversity stems from the fact that although all societies past and present have a concept of kinship, each society has a different concept of who is and is not related,...

kinship

kinship   Reference library

Sally Humphreys

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
609 words

...rites of passage and system of fictive kinship (godparents). Kinship was also ‘good to think with’. Ideas about hereditary qualities encouraged careful breeding of horses and dogs, and Plato ’s Republic extended it to humans. Genealogy could be a tool for mapping the world of the gods ( Hesiod ) or stories about heroes (Hecataeus of Miletus). Such stories were still used in diplomatic negotiations in the Hellenistic period (A. Erskine, in D. Ogden (ed.), The Hellenistic World ( 2002 ), 97 ff.). Fantasy kinship reversed norms, from Homer’s Aeolus to...

kinship

kinship   Reference library

Sally Humphreys

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
694 words

...Christianity developed its own rites of passage and system of fictive kinship (*godparents). Kinship was also ‘good to think with’. Ideas about hereditary qualities encouraged careful breeding of horses and dogs, and Plato (1) 's Republic extended it to humans. Genealogy could be a tool for mapping the world of the gods (*Hesiod) or stories about heroes (*Hecataeus (1)). Such stories were still used in diplomatic negotiations in the Hellenistic period (Erskine, below). Fantasy kinship reversed norms, from Homer's Aeolus to Herodotus' Nasmoneans; gods and...

Kinship

Kinship   Reference library

Andrew D. Streett

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Ethics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion, Philosophy
Length:
3,271 words

... Kinship has become an area of study concerned with familial relationships in which, among other issues, scholars seek to understand the societal assumptions and expectations with regard to family structure, descent, marriage, and intergenerational responsibilities. Although kinship is a well-defined area of study in its own right, it is inextricably intertwined with the study of politics, economics, and religion in the ancient world. In addition to relationships formed by birth or marriage, anthropologists also refer to “fictive kinship,” in which a...

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
155 words

... Political institutions based on family relationships are the staple of anthropology . Anthropologists have established that the structure of powers and rights may be patrilineal or matrilineal (in Western written codes it has been almost exclusively patrilineal— see feminism ). Some anthropologists have highlighted the importance of lineage (descent) in perpetuating political structures; others prefer to stress the role of marriage. There is a long ethical tradition of encouraging people to be as altruistic towards non‐relations as they are (assumed to...

Kinship

Kinship   Reference library

Eileen Cahill

The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
1,293 words

...she has inherited. Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar also explore the literary dimension of kinship in No Man's Land ( 1988 ). In place of “the inexorable lineage of the biological family,” they substitute the concept of affiliation for both the paternal and maternal traditions. Akin to adoption in the language of the family , affiliation would allow the writer the choice of parenthood and would also insure continuity of parenting. If the idea of kinship is undergoing a critical interrogation on the theoretical level, the same query occurs on the...

kinship

kinship   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Cultural Anthropology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Anthropology
Length:
138 words

...kinship The social and conceptual systems and processes that organize people into social groups based on descent and marriage . The study of kinship has been a central topic since the discipline’s emergence, although for just as long anthropologists have debated what it is and how to study it, including whether, as a Western concept, it even has cross-cultural validity. Historically, study of kinship has been divided among six broad approaches, each associated with various theories: (1) evolutionary and biological ( see evolutionism and ...

Kinship

Kinship   Reference library

Warren SHAPIRO

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History
Length:
2,883 words

...Kinship In the most basic sense the word kinship refers to the connections people have through family—by blood (procreation) and marriage. Thus defined, kinship is reducible to parent-child, sibling-sibling, and spouse-spouse relationships, and it extends to include other family members—grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, and in-laws. But people often claim or evoke kinship with others through a community of shared or common interests, especially regarding nurturing and sustenance. Sociologists who study kinship presume differing views on how kinship...

fictive kinship

fictive kinship  

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference

...kinship Describes intense and usually ritualized interpersonal bonds that draw on kinship as a model, such as godparenting, brotherhoods, and forms of religious or political...

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