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imagined community

Benedict Anderson's definition of nation. In Imagined Communities (1983) Anderson argues that the nation is an imagined political community that is inherently limited in scope and ...

imagined community

imagined community   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Journalism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
42 words

...imagined community A media audience conceptualized as a form of political, national, or other type of ‘community’, which often finds expression in journalists’ use of terms such as ‘us’, ‘we’, and ‘our’ in copy. Compare imagined audience . See also ideology ; media agenda...

imagined community

imagined community   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
124 words

... community A group sharing an abstract, symbolic, but distinctive identity whose members cannot collectively meet or know each other but to which its members nevertheless feel they belong. In 1983, Benedict Anderson referred to a nation as ‘an imagined political community’, emphasizing that it is imagined rather than imaginary . In modern nations, the mass media have been important in developing and sustaining a collective sense of national identity and ‘the people’, sustained through what Barthes refers to as myth —reflected, for instance, in...

imagined community

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... community This term was first used (B. Anderson 2006 ) to describe a nation, for even in the smallest nation, people will never know, meet, or hear about all their fellow-countrymen, but most people will have in their minds an image of their nation as a community. Thus, A. Latham et al. ( 2009 ) describe an imagined community as ‘a group of people, united in the sense of their community, this unity being aided by newspapers, magazines, poster hoardings, cinema, radio, and...

imagined community

imagined community   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
122 words

... community Benedict Anderson 's term for large communities (quintessentially nations) in which the collective social bond must be imagined rather than directly experienced through face-to-face interactions. The concept is central to Anderson's account of the rise of modern nationalism and nation-state s through the spread of literacy and print-capitalism ( Imagined Communities , 1983 ). In the course of this development, newspapers, museums, and other new “technologies” become the means of representing the collective national experience—if only by...

imagined community

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A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
215 words

... community A collective of people who possess a common, imagined sense of political and national unity. The concept was first proposed by Benedict Anderson in Imagined Communities ( 1983 / 2006 ) to think about what constitutes a nation . Anderson’s argument is that at the heart of any nation is a sense of nationalism ; a sense of pride and belonging to a people rooted in place. The nation is an imagined community ‘because the members of even the smallest nation will never know most of their fellow-members, meet them, or even hear of them, yet in...

imagined community

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A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
210 words

... community Benedict Anderson ( 1936–2015 ), in his book Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (2nd edn., 1991, originally 1983 ) referred to the nation as an imagined political community. It is imagined because: ( a ) the members never know or meet most of their fellow-members, yet in the minds of each lives the image of their communion; ( b ) it is limited because even the largest of them has finite, if elastic, boundaries, beyond which lie other nations; ( c ) it is sovereign because its members have the right...

imagined community

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

... community Benedict Anderson 's definition of nation. In Imagined Communities ( 1983 ) Anderson argues that the nation is an imagined political community that is inherently limited in scope and sovereign in nature. It is imagined because the actuality of even the smallest nation exceeds what it is possible for a single person to know—one cannot know every person in a nation, just as one cannot know every aspect of its economy, geography, history, and so forth. But as Anderson is careful to point out (contra Ernest Gellner ) imagined is not the same...

imagined community

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... community Benedict Anderson ’s definition of nation. In Imagined Communities ( 1983 ) Anderson argues that the nation is an imagined political community that is inherently limited in scope and sovereign in nature. It is imagined because the actuality of even the smallest nation exceeds what it is possible for a single person to know—one cannot know every person in a nation, just as one cannot know every aspect of its economy, geography, history, and so forth. But as Anderson is careful to point out (contra Ernest Gellner ) imagined is not the same...

imagined community

imagined community  

Benedict Anderson's definition of nation. In Imagined Communities (1983) Anderson argues that the nation is an imagined political community that is inherently limited in scope and sovereign in ...
Utopianism

Utopianism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,929 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...‘Utopianism’ can be taken in several senses: as the aspiration to imagine, establish, or discover a more perfect society and, after Thomas More 's Utopia ( 1516 ), as the literary genre commonly associated with such aims. The utopian desire can assume many forms, such as *millenarianism , scientific enthusiasm, speculation about distant worlds, the description of model constitutions, imagined futures and communities, and conceptions of the past or ‘golden age’ of any society or mankind in general. The literary genre, in addition, is usually taken...

43a The History of the Book in Southeast Asia (1): The Islands

43a The History of the Book in Southeast Asia (1): The Islands   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
2,543 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...a formative role in shaping public discourse and in forging different ‘imagined communities’ of people sharing the same world view. A printing press above a Malay advertisement for the printer in Tanah Abang (a sub-district of Central Jakarta, Indonesia), from Haji Adam’s 1926 booklet Syair Mikraj Nabi Muhammad SAW (‘Poem on the Ascension of the Prophet Muḥammad, peace be upon him’). Private collection Professor E. P. Wieringa, Cologne Bibliography B. Anderson , Imagined Communities (1983) T. E. Behrend and W. van der Molen , eds., ‘ Manuscripts of...

Scottish Local and Family History

Scottish Local and Family History   Quick reference

David moody

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,622 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of genealogy appears to have no distinctively Scottish element, being shared by peoples throughout western Europe and the New World; though the fact that so many Scots emigrated to the latter has made Scotland a particular focus, with added associations of nostalgia for lost, imagined homelands. Given Scotland's poor crop of archives, however, few genealogies can be traced back further than the late 18th century. Multi‐disciplinary approaches are now as important in family history as in local history. Scottish demography has its key text in Michael Flinn ...

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...National Memory and the Protestant Calendar in Elizabethan and Stuart England (1989) ). In countryside localities the continuing pre‐modern significance of the more secularized annual round is strongly brought out in Bob Bushaway , ‘The Community and its Calendars’, in Bushaway , By Rite: Custom, Ceremony and Community in England, 1700–1880 (1982) ). Civic Ritual The changing pattern of public urban ritual has to be understood as crystallizing much wider processes, because cities and large †towns were so central to the regionalized nature and development...

War

War   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,919 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of the cohesiveness of the British state came from the way parliament was used by local communities to settle their disputes and back their actions with statutory authority; indeed, most of parliament's business was concerned with these matters until well into the nineteenth century. During the war the degree of local autonomy was demonstrated in the abject failure of the provisional cavalry in 1797 and of Pitt's Additional Force in 1804–5 , and in the way communities protected themselves against militia ‘conscription’. Volunteer corps were to a significant...

Language

Language   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,614 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...vulgarity. A smaller number were intended for the improvement of the middling sort, but most grammarians who were prepared to address this new readership insisted that it conform to the usage of the metropolitan élite. Not to use language in certain ways was to threaten the imagined community of the nation and to court exclusion from the public sphere of polite society. In the eighteenth century, it was commonly believed that a nation's ‘genius’ could be discovered in the characteristics of its language and, conversely, that remedying defects or halting decay in...

2 The Sacred Book

2 The Sacred Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,978 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of faith made by monks and nuns into a basic code used to guarantee proper monastic behaviour. After it became established in this way, it functioned as a monastic liturgy. Monks and nuns periodically chanted these rules within their respective communities as entire groups, which worked to unify the communities and functioned as a reminder of the rules that bound them together. The group recitation of the Pāṭimokkha occurred twice a month in connection with fast days ( Poṣadha ) that were historically connected to the religious significance of the new and...

Slavery

Slavery   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,891 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...indentured labour from India (creating a system which survived until the First World War). However, such changes failed to prevent the rapid decline of the economic power and influence which the Caribbean had once mustered in British imperial affairs. Soon, it was hard even to imagine how important the islands had once been. As the British looked elsewhere for trade and dominion, the Caribbean seemed little more than a troublesome backwater—a reminder of a former but now redundant empire. What had made the West Indies so important—so crucial an element in the...

Painting

Painting   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,778 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...from the mechanical skills of craftsmanship, redefined as a liberal intellectual working within an enlightened Academic community, and mythologized as someone constantly seeking to ‘raise the thoughts, and extend the views of the spectator’. As well as offering a morally and culturally elevated position for the modern artist, the Discourses sought to define a proper public for painting in Britain. This public was imagined as a body of cultivated gentlemen whose education and leisure allowed them to interpret and appreciate successfully the exemplary...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Here he began mimicking the identities of notable contemporary figures, all of whom he imagined as rebels against the sorts of social deference that had contributed to his own neurosis and eventual *madness . One such figure was Robert *Burns , the only peasant poet of the era who, thanks to the long-established tradition of Scottish folk scholarship, had managed to become a literary celebrity without relinquishing his political independence or raffish ways. One imagines that Clare longed similarly to be able to get away with writing a pungent,...

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,935 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of our nature. This co-ordination of aesthetics and subjectivity introduces a political programme: the poet emerges as a prophet who speaks for human nature, creates a community of taste, and so binds together what modern life divides. In De Quincey's language, the poet's literature of power awakens individuals to a nature which, because it is shared with others, can form the basis of community. The Preface to Lyrical Ballads is one of the most influential documents in the tradition of liberal humanism. Mediated by the work of J. S. *Mill and Matthew...

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