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hyperreality

1. In a mediated context, an artificially created copy that is perceived as somehow more real than the real thing, or too real to be real: modelled on reality but with an ...

hyperreality

hyperreality   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... A state supposedly more real—more sensation-packed—than reality, which can seem flat and dull. A hyperreal procedure would not use observations taken from real things; rather, it would use photographic representations to construct a world. Baudrillard shows that immaterial representations of reality begin to blur with material reality especially in highly commodified societies that depend heavily on advertising and image manipulation, such as the USA. These images, simulations, and signifiers he calls hyperreality. D. DeLyser, ed. ( 2010 ), p. 233...

hyperreality

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

... An aesthetic mode of reproduction or replication that strives to produce an effect that is more real than the real thing being copied. Italian author, semiotician, and cultural critic, Umberto Eco , coined the term in an essay entitled ‘Travels in Hyperreality’ ( 1975 ) which tries to account for the particular attraction to Americans of waxwork museums, Ripley 's ‘Believe it or Not!’, and the seemingly relentless replication of icons of European culture, such as Las Vegas's mini Eiffel Tower. Somewhat snobbishly, Eco regards the logic behind such...

hyperreality

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A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... An aesthetic mode of reproduction or replication that strives to produce an effect that is more real than the real thing being copied. Italian author, semiotician, and cultural critic, Umberto Eco , coined the term in an essay entitled ‘Travels in Hyperreality’ ( 1975 ) which tries to account for the particular attraction to Americans of waxwork museums, Ripley ’s ‘Believe it or Not!’, and the seemingly relentless replication of icons of European culture, such as Las Vegas’s mini Eiffel Tower. Somewhat snobbishly, Eco regards the logic behind...

hyperreality

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A Dictionary of Media and Communication (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
118 words

... ( adj. hyperreal ) 1. In a mediated context, an artificially created copy that is perceived as somehow more real than the real thing, or too real to be real: modelled on reality but with an exaggerated intensity, such as computer-generated films with unnaturally bright and vibrant colours ( compare uncanny valley ). In visual art, often a synonym for photorealism . See also post-photography . 2. For Umberto Eco , the celebration of the fake in popular culture: for example, theme parks such as Disneyland feature automata, which are combinations...

hyperreality

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A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
161 words

... 1. A situation in which people are unable to distinguish reality from the simulation of reality. 2. A condition in which a simulacrum appears to be more real than the real thing. In the former case, it is acknowledged that people often experience the world through multiple forms of media that present and filter it; as such one rarely experiences an event directly but through its representation. In a media-saturated world, this representation—the copy—becomes inimical to the real. Taken to its logical extreme, the pastiche copy of an original...

hyper-reality

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A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... An assertion by Jean Baudrillard ( 1929–2007 ) that the saturation of everyday life by the mass media is such that reality loses its meaning as people cease to experience being participants in their own lives, become observers of media spectacles, and are defined by signs and representations of ‘reality’ to the extent that access to anything real is no longer possible....

hyperreality

hyperreality  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
1. In a mediated context, an artificially created copy that is perceived as somehow more real than the real thing, or too real to be real: modelled on reality but with an exaggerated intensity, such ...
Hyper-Realism

Hyper-Realism   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
61 words

... A term that appeared in the 1970s to describe art in which a heightened attention is given to descriptive realism, in essence making the ordinary extraordinary. Leading sculptors exhibiting this trend include Duane Hanson and, more recently, Ron Mueck ; prominent Hyper-Realist painters and printmakers have included Chuck Close and Richard Estes. In painting the term is also synonymous with...

hyperreal

hyperreal adjective   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
70 words
hyperreal

hyperreal adjective   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
75 words
hyperreal

hyperreal adjective   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
26 words
hyperrealism

hyperrealism noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
13 words
hyperreal

hyperreal adjective   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
41 words
Hyper-Realism

Hyper-Realism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A term that appeared in the 1970s to describe art in which a heightened attention is given to descriptive realism, in essence making the ordinary extraordinary. Leading sculptors exhibiting this ...
Disneyfication

Disneyfication  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
A pejorative term for the metaphorical resemblance of some cultural phenomenon to a theme park. The connotations typically include cultural homogenization, McDonaldization, sanitization, ‘family ...
phantasmagoria

phantasmagoria  

A fantastic or dreamlike sequence of real or imagined images. See also phantasticant. phantasmagoric or phantasmagorical adj. [From French phantasmagorie production of phantasms, from Greek phantasma ...
aura

aura  

According to Benjamin (1936), the distinctive singularity of an original work of art, the potency of which he attributed to its authenticity, presence, uniqueness, and historical context. He argued ...
simulation

simulation  

The view that our understanding of others is not gained by the tacit use of a ‘theory’, enabling us to infer what thoughts or intentions explain their actions, but by reliving the situation ‘in their ...
Aaron Draper Shattuck

Aaron Draper Shattuck  

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Overview Page
(1832–1928).Painter. Primarily a landscapist, he is known particularly for views of New Hampshire's White Mountains, but he also painted the Atlantic coast and other locales. In addition, he produced ...
Martin Johnson Heade

Martin Johnson Heade  

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Overview Page
(1819–1904).Painter. Known for landscapes as well as depictions of hummingbirds and flowers, early in his career he also painted portraits and a few other subjects. An idiosyncratic and aloof ...

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