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homeotic gene

A homeobox gene in which mutations can transform part or whole of a body segment into the corresponding part of another segment. Homeotic genes are involved in the development of the basic ...

homeotic gene

homeotic gene   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
48 words

... gene ( homoeotic gene , Hox gene ) A homeobox gene in which mutations can transform part or whole of a body segment into the corresponding part of another segment. Homeotic genes are involved in the development of the basic body plan of metamerically segmented animals...

homeotic gene

homeotic gene   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
150 words

... gene or homeodomain‐encoding gene or homeobox‐encoding gene or Hox gene any of the genes that are allelic for mutations resulting in the conversion of one body part into another. Homeotic genes were first discovered in Drosophila ; a mutation in such a gene could, e.g., result in a leg replacing an antenna. While Drosophila has only two Hox clusters, in nematodes there is one, and in vertebrates four clusters of 9 to 11 genes each located on a separate chromosome and spanning more than 100 kb. The vertebrate Hox genes are expressed in...

homeotic gene

homeotic gene  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A homeobox gene in which mutations can transform part or whole of a body segment into the corresponding part of another segment. Homeotic genes are involved in the development of the basic body plan ...
homeotic genes

homeotic genes   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...developmental abnormalities ( homeotic mutants ). Homeobox genes are clustered and activated in a 3′ to 5′ direction with genes that are involved in morphologically anterior systems, which are activated earlier in development, at the 3′ end. This colinearity of genes and morphological position is intriguing. Vertebrates have four duplicate sets (paralogues) of the ten ancient homeotic genes, known as Hoxa, Hoxb, Hoxc , and Hoxd . Synpolydactyly is one of relatively few developmental defects caused by mutations in hox genes...

homeotic genes

homeotic genes   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
213 words

...homeotic genes A class of genes, including the Hox genes, that play a central role in controlling the early development and differentiation of embryonic tissues in eukaryotic organisms, including plants, animals, and fungi. They code for transcription factors —proteins that bind to DNA and regulate the expression of a wide range of other genes. This binding capability resides in a structural domain of the protein called a homeodomain, encoded by a nucleotide sequence that is characteristic of homeotic genes ( see homeobox ). These genes were first...

homeotic mutations

homeotic mutations  

Those in which one developmental pattern is replaced by a different, but homologous one. The homeotic mutations of Drosophila cause an organ to differentiate abnormally and to form a homologous organ ...
homeotic selector

homeotic selector  

Any of a family of genes in Drosophila that select the expression of homeotic genes. They encode homologous regulatory proteins that contain a homeobox sequence.
Edward B. Lewis

Edward B. Lewis  

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(1918–2004) American geneticistLewis was educated at the University of Minnesota, and at the California Institute of Technology gaining his PhD in 1942. In 1946 he joined the Cal Tech faculty, where ...
floral organ identity mutations

floral organ identity mutations  

Homeotic mutations (q.v.) in which one floral organ has been replaced by another. For example, in Arabidopsis thaliana (q.v.) the apetala 2 mutations have sepals converted into carpels and petals ...
bithorax

bithorax  

A gene residing at 58.8 on the genetic map and within segment 89E of the salivary map of Drosophila melanogaster. The bx gene is one of a cluster of three genes that specify the type of ...
proboscipedia

proboscipedia  

One of the homeotic mutations (q.v.) of Drosophila which belongs to the Antennapedia complex. The homeotic mutations figure shows a normal fly head with its proboscis extending downward (A). The ...
Hox genes

Hox genes  

A class of homeotic genes that control development of structures along the head-to-tail (anteroposterior) axis of a wide range of animals. The Hox genes are organized into clusters on certain ...
BX-C

BX-C  

abbr. for the bithorax complex, one of two (see ANT‐C) major families of homeotic genes in Drosophila, mutations in which affect thoracic and abdominal segments.
segment identity genes

segment identity genes  

Genes that determine the type of differentiation the cells in a specific Drosophila segment will undergo. These genes express themselves later in development than the zygotic segmentation genes. ...
antennapedia

antennapedia  

A gene residing at 47.9 on the genetic map and within segment 84B of the salivary map of Drosophila melanogaster. The Antp gene is one of a cluster of three genes that specify the type of ...
spineless-aristapedia

spineless-aristapedia  

One of the homeotic mutations (q.v.) of Drosophila located at 3-58.5. The distal portions of the antennae are transformed into leg-like structures with claws. The homeotic mutations illustration on ...
body plan

body plan  

The ‘blueprint’ according to which an organism develops a predetermined number, arrangement, and size of body components. The body plan is embodied and implemented by the organism's genes (e.g. ...
MADS box gene

MADS box gene  

Any of a superfamily of genes that encode transcription factors having crucial roles in the development of plants, animals, and fungi. The transcription factors are characterized by the MADS box, a ...
polycomb repressive complexes

polycomb repressive complexes  

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Multiprotein complexes involving products of the polycomb group (PcG) genes which were initially identified as regulators of homeotic genes in Drosophila and are implicated in regulation of stem cell ...
Mel-18

Mel-18  

ora gene, first identified in a melanoma, that encodes a nuclear RING finger protein. It is related to Polycomb of Drosophila, which controls expression of homeotic genes. The gene is widely ...

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