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homoeostasis

The tendency of a biological system to resist change and to maintain itself in a state of stable equilibrium.

homeostasis (also homoeostasis)

homeostasis (also homoeostasis)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
9 words

... ( also homoeostasis) a fluctuation-free state. See developmental homeostasis...

homoeostasis

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A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
23 words

... ( homeostasis ) The tendency of a biological system to resist change and to maintain itself in a state of stable...

homoeostasis

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A Dictionary of Geology and Earth Sciences (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... ( homeostasis ) The condition of a system that possesses a capacity for self-regulation whereby it resists...

homoeostasis

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A Dictionary of Zoology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
23 words

... ( homeostasis ) The tendency of a biological system to resist change and to maintain itself in a state of stable equilibrium....

homoeostasis

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A Dictionary of Ecology (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... ( homeostasis ) The tendency of a biological system to resist change and to maintain itself in a state of stable equilibrium....

homeostasis

homeostasis   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
32 words

... or homoeostasis the maintenance of a relatively constant internal environment in the bodies of higher animals by means of a series of interacting physiological and biochemical processes. —homeostatic or homoeostatic ...

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...homeostasis ( homoeostasis ) The maintenance of constancy. Homeostatic mechanisms keep the properties of the internal environment of organisms within fairly well-defined limits and generally require a sensor, a control centre, and positive or negative feedback regulation ....

homeostasis

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The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... The ability or tendency to maintain a constant physical or chemical state within a system using compensatory control mechanisms. Physiological homeostasis is illustrated by the maintenance of a constant body core temperature and blood sugar levels. Psychological homeostasis is illustrated by the maintenance of self-respect through compensatory devices such as rationalization and blaming others for faults. In sociology, homeostasis has been applied to the controversial suggestion that social systems (including governing bodies of sport) tend to act in...

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... The maintenance of a steady state regulated by self-adjusting mechanisms, under ever-changing conditions. See Lau and Lane (2001) PPG 25, 2...

homeostasis

homeostasis n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Nursing (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
28 words

...homeostasis [hoh-mi-oh- stay -sis] n. the physiological process by which the internal systems of the body are maintained at equilibrium, despite variations in the external conditions. —homeostatic adj....

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Dentistry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
30 words

... n. ( adj. homeostatic ) The ability of the body to maintain its physiological equilibrium (e.g. the circulatory system, body temperature, hormonal balance), despite variations in the external...

homeostasis

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
34 words

... In biology, processes that maintain constant conditions within a cell or organism in response to either internal or external changes. An example is the regulation of body temperature by the skin and...

homeostasis

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Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
34 words

... n. the physiological process by which the internal systems of the body (e.g. blood pressure, body temperature, acid-base balance ) are maintained at equilibrium, despite variations in the external conditions. — homeostatic ...

homeostasis

homeostasis   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the History of Modern Science

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, History of Science
Length:
470 words

...entitled Relations of Biological and Social Homeostasis, whether it might not “be useful to examine other forms of organization—industrial, domestic, or social—in the light of the organization of the body?” His suggestion has been followed, and homeostasis in its widest sense now means the “maintenance of a dynamically stable state within a system by means of internal regulatory processes that counteract external disturbances of the equilibrium.” Walter Cannon , Organization for Physiological Homeostasis , Physiological Reviews , 9 (1929): 399–427....

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
106 words

...homeostasis The regulation by an organism of the chemical composition of its body fluids and other aspects of its internal environment so that physiological processes can proceed at optimum rates. It involves monitoring changes in the external and internal environment by means of receptors and adjusting the physiological variables, such as the composition of body fluids, accordingly; excretion and osmoregulation are important in this process. Examples of homeostatic regulation are the maintenance of the acid-base balance and body temperature ( see ...

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n . The maintenance of equilibrium in any physiological, psychological, or social process by an automatic feedback mechanism compensating for disrupting changes. The word was coined by the US physiologist Walter Bradford Cannon ( 1871–1945 ) and became popular after the publication in 1932 of his book The Wisdom of the Body , in which the process is described in relation to the automatic maintenance of body temperature and components of blood, including water, salt, sugar, proteins, fat, calcium, oxygen, hydrogen ions—the list could be...

homeostasis

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The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
294 words

... . The main concept of homeostasis is the principle of negative feedback control, which was developed for military purposes in the Second World War. It is the basis of cybernetics , whose founding fathers were Norbert Wiener , Ross Ashby , and Grey Walter . Producing stability in dynamic systems by negative feedback has, however, a history back to James Watt's governor for the automatic regulation of steam engines as their load varies, and the still earlier controls for windmills. There are even hints of the notion of feeding the output of a...

homeostasis

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The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,358 words
Illustration(s):
1

...pressure was an essential part of the maintenance. It was Cannon who actually coined the word ‘homeostasis’, and in his Wisdom of the body ( 1932 ) he described how several of the body's systems were involved in homeostatic mechanisms. Cannon's fellow professor at Harvard, L. J. Henderson , analysed the way in which the body maintained the hydrogen ion concentration of body fluids (usually expressed as pH) within narrow limits. There is a short-term pH homeostasis which is a property of blood itself: a bicarbonate-buffering system. If this is not adequate,...

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... The maintenance of a stable internal environment in the...

homeostasis

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A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... The process of self‐regulation which maintains steady state within environmental systems through adjustment and feedback...

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