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heliocentric longitude

(l) A coordinate that gives the position of an object around the ecliptic as it would be seen from the centre of the Sun. It is measured in degrees from 0° to 360° clockwise ...

heliocentric longitude

heliocentric longitude   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... longitude ( symbol l ) A coordinate that gives the position of an object around the ecliptic as it would be seen from the centre of the Sun. It is measured in degrees from 0° to 360° clockwise along the ecliptic, starting at the vernal equinox....

heliocentric longitude

heliocentric longitude  

(l)A coordinate that gives the position of an object around the ecliptic as it would be seen from the centre of the Sun. It is measured in degrees from 0° to 360° clockwise along the ecliptic, ...
heliocentric coordinates

heliocentric coordinates  

Any system of coordinates with their origin at the centre of the Sun. They are often used for describing the positions of bodies in the Solar System. They can be either spherical coordinates or ...
ecliptic coordinates

ecliptic coordinates  

A system of coordinates that specifies the position of an object in the Solar System relative to the plane of the Earth's orbit, the ecliptic. Ecliptic coordinates of objects as they would be seen ...
longitude

longitude  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The angle around some reference plane from an adopted starting-point. In astronomy, the equivalent of longitude on Earth is right ascension. See also celestial longitude; galactic longitude; ...
inequality

inequality  

A variation in the movement of a celestial object in its orbit about another which cannot be accounted for by their mutual gravitational attraction. Inequalities usually arise because of the ...
latitude

latitude  

The angle north or south of some reference plane. In astronomy, the equivalent of terrestrial latitude is termed declination. See also celestial latitude; galactic latitude; heliocentric latitude.
longitude

longitude   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... The angle around some reference plane from an adopted starting-point. In astronomy, the equivalent of longitude on Earth is right ascension . See also celestial longitude ; galactic longitude ; heliocentric longitude...

ecliptic coordinates

ecliptic coordinates   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...as they would be seen from the centre of the Earth (i.e. geocentric ecliptic coordinates ) are given in terms of celestial latitude and celestial longitude (also known as ecliptic latitude and longitude). Ecliptic coordinates of objects as they would be seen from the centre of the Sun (i.e. heliocentric ecliptic coordinates ) are given in terms of heliocentric latitude and heliocentric longitude...

heliocentric coordinates

heliocentric coordinates   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... coordinates Any system of coordinates with their origin at the centre of the Sun. They are often used for describing the positions of bodies in the Solar System. They can be either spherical coordinates or rectangular coordinates . Heliocentric spherical coordinates are given in terms of heliocentric latitude and heliocentric longitude . A variant system, barycentric coordinates , gives positions referred to the centre of mass of the Solar System (the barycentre ), which is slightly displaced from the centre of the...

inequality

inequality   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...attraction. Inequalities usually arise because of the perturbing forces of one or more other massive objects in the system. For example, the so-called great inequality in the orbital movements of the planets Jupiter and Saturn about the Sun is an oscillation in their heliocentric longitude with a period of some 900 years caused by their mutual perturbations and also by the nearly 2 : 5 resonance in their mean motions. See also Lunar Inequality...

Ptolemy

Ptolemy ((Claudius Ptolemaeus; fl. 127–141 CE))   Reference library

prudence jones

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,536 words

...of the five known planets, a heliocentric (sun-centered) universe had no particular advantage for him. Although Aristarchus, a third-century BCE astronomer and philosopher from Samos, had hypothesized a heliocentric universe, his calculations of the size and distance of the sun and moon were from a geocentric perspective. Because of the accuracy and usefulness of these geocentric calculations as predictors, Ptolemy’s Almagest continued to influence astronomers until, in the sixteenth century, Copernicus presented his heliocentric theory. Ptolemy’s less famous...

Blaeu, Willem Janszoon

Blaeu, Willem Janszoon (1571–1638)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
1,063 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the universe as a heliocentric system, and a tellurion (Latin tellurium ) completed in 1634 showed the earth moving around the sun. In his treatise on the use of globes (first published in 1634 and reprinted nine times in Latin, five times in Dutch, three times in French, and once, partially, in Japanese), Blaeu explained how these devices could be used both “according to the opinion of Ptolemy with a fixed earth” and “after the natural proposition of Nicolaus Copernicus with a moving earth.” However, the idea of finding longitude at sea by observing...

astrology and astronomy

astrology and astronomy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...astronomical system underlying the Equatorie of the Planetis was thoroughly Ptolemaic. It was one aimed at the calculation of planetary longitudes and latitudes , rather than at explaining planetary movement on the basis of physics: Aristotelian cosmology was regarded to a great extent as a different subject. The Ptolemaic scheme was entirely geocentric. (Aristarchus, in the 3rd c. bc , had proposed a heliocentric system, but it was not generally adopted.) The geometrical models for planetary motion varied from planet to planet. The simplest was for...

Navigational Manuals

Navigational Manuals   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
3,331 words

...on new topics than to delete a section on a particular topic once it had become part of the canon. Manuals were usually getting fatter rather than thinner. The main impetus behind this expansion was not a major shift in the underlying scientific worldview (differences between heliocentric or geocentric worldviews for a long time did not matter for practical navigation) but innovations at the meso- or micro levels of methods of observation, calculation, or plotting and the associated aids and instruments. The principal changes in textbooks in the seventeenth...

Astronomy

Astronomy   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
3,196 words

...of this view of the cosmos were espoused by later Stoics, as by virtually all Greek and Roman mathematical astronomers for whom we have evidence. (The exception is Aristarchus of Samos, who is reported to have—uninfluentially and perhaps only experimentally—hypothesized a heliocentric cosmos.) Not until some time in the fourth century do we see the first Greek interest in even approximately modeling the actual motions of the planets, with their complex changes in latitude, speed, and direction (retrogradation). In book 12 of the Metaphysics , Aristotle...

Qushjī, ʿAlī al-

Qushjī, ʿAlī al-   Reference library

Salim Ayduz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Science and technology
Length:
2,232 words

...yumkinu fī al-sufliyayn (Treatise on the Eccentric Hypothesis Being Possible for the Two Lower [Planets] Just as for the Others). This is a book dealing with an eccentric model instead of epicyclical models for both inner and outer planets; it has vital importance for a heliocentric cosmology-astronomy, on the path to Copernicus through Regiomontanus. It is one of the most important books of ʿAlī al-Qushjī, who critiques and edits previous authors such as Ptolemy and Muslim astronomers, in particular Kutb al-Dīn Shirāzī’s ideas in his book al-Tuhfat...

Science

Science   Reference library

Julio Samsó, Carimo Mohomed, and Diego Melo

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Science and technology
Length:
7,075 words

...easier, both he and his Toledan colleague ʿAlī ibn Khalaf designed universal astrolabes that could be used for any geographical latitude. He was also interested in the problem of calculating planetary longitudes, and for that purpose he compiled his perpetual almanac, which used specific cycles for each planet and allowed obtaining a longitude for any day of the solar year practically without computation. With the same purpose, he designed an instrument, the equatorium, which improved on the previous version of the instrument by Ibn al-Samḥ. Equatoria...

Technology

Technology   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...in printing. 1504 Amerigo Vespucci recognizes New World is not Asia. 1510 Leonardo da Vinci proposes water-driven turbine and many other science concepts. 1521 Ferdinand Magellan's circumnavigation confirms Earth's size. 1543 Nicolas Copernicus publishes De Revolutionibus , heliocentric theory. 1568 Gerhart Mercator's map projection for sailors and explorers. 1600 William Gilbert explains Earth's magnetism. 1608 Galileo improves telescope, advances ideas on gravity and motion. 1609 Johann Kepler recognizes planetary motions. 1640 Coke first made from coal....

science in history

science in history   Reference library

Science, Technology, and Society

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...the sixteenth a rise of activity took place in the University in Krakow, founded in 1364 by Casimir the Great, the King of Poland. The department of astronomy at the University of Krakow achieved great fame, thanks to Nicholas Copernicus ( 1473–1543 ) and his work on the heliocentric movement of planets. Copernicus was born at Torun in Poland and was educated at the University of Krakow from 1491 . Then he studied astronomy at Bologna, medicine at Padua, and law at Ferrara. Although he spent most of his life as the canon of the cathedral at Frombork...

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