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hanamichi

The ‘flower path’ in Japanese, a characteristic feature of the kabuki stage, is a platform a little less than a metre wide, the same height as the stage, running from ...

Hanamichi

Hanamichi   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
407 words

...along the side of the hanamichi come on to accentuate its use. Besides the main walkway, or hon hanamichi a narrower, temporary walkway, or kari hanamichi (formerly called the higashi no ayumi , “eastern walkway”), may be set up on the stage-left side. Nowadays it is used only for special plays, but it was once a permanent feature (from the late 1700s to the twentieth century). The hanamichi is extremely important for major exits and entrances and has numerous conventionalized uses. It creates great intimacy between audience and actor when an...

hanamichi

hanamichi   Reference library

Laurence Kominz

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
304 words

... The ‘flower path’ in Japanese, a characteristic feature of the kabuki stage, is a platform a little less than a metre (3 feet) long, the same height as the stage, running from stage right to the back of the auditorium . (A similar, temporary hanamichi from stage left is used for a few plays.) The audience is seated on both sides of this ramp, which is used primarily to give impact to entrances and exits. Important action usually takes place seven-tenths of the way from the back of the auditorium at a spot known as the shichi-san (seven-three),...

hanamichi

hanamichi   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
210 words

...The origins of the hanamichi are in dispute, but the term may have referred originally to the place where fans could step onto the stage and present gifts to the actors ( hana means ‘flower’ and thus ‘gift’). During the seventeenth century kabuki was most often presented on a stage resembling that of the *nō theatre, with entrances and exits played on the hashigakari bridgeway parallel to the stage at the right. But beginning in the 1680s the bridgeway was gradually expanded, until by the 1730s the permanent hanamichi came into common use....

hanamichi

hanamichi  

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Overview Page
The ‘flower path’ in Japanese, a characteristic feature of the kabuki stage, is a platform a little less than a metre wide, the same height as the stage, running from ...
Winter Garden

Winter Garden  

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Overview Page
New York theatre at 50th Street and Broadway. Designed to suggest an English garden, it opened with a revue, La Belle Paree (1911), starring Al Jolson, who was long associated ...
Emil Orlik

Emil Orlik  

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(1870–1932)German-Czech artist and designer. Best known as a painter and graphic artist, Orlik was associated with the art nouveau movement in Munich in the 1890s. In Berlin Orlik worked ...
shingeki

shingeki  

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Overview Page
‘New theatre’, the leading movement in modern Japanese theatre until the 1960s. For much of the twentieth century the modernization of theatre in Japan meant westernization, a project that created ...
environmental theatre

environmental theatre  

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Overview Page
A term coined by Schechner in 1968 to refer to the non-frontal, spectator-incorporative theatre he was then creating with the Performance Group. The concept can be traced to the processional ...
scenography

scenography  

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Overview Page
Perspective drawing or scene-painting. The representation of a building in perspective. Nash's composition of Regent Street, London, was an exercise in scenographic composition as his palace-fronts ...
kabuki

kabuki  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Japanese form of dance theatre dating back to the 16th century. Kabuki means song, dance, and acting, although the term originally meant shocking or strange, in reference to the form's unusual style. ...
Orlik, Emil

Orlik, Emil   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
168 words

...'s The Robbers ( 1908 ), after which he became more directly involved in staging and the entire visual effect. In 1900–1 Orlik had spent a year in Japan studying artistic techniques. This experience was decisive in the construction of a *kabuki-style stage with a * hanamichi (ramp) for the *pantomime Sumurun ( 1910 ), a massive and wordless Reinhardt show performed in Berlin, Paris, London, and New York. Other set designs for Reinhardt included Oedipus the King ( 1910 ). Christopher...

Orlik, Emil

Orlik, Emil   Reference library

Christopher Balme

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
185 words

...'s The Robbers ( 1908 ), after which he became more directly involved in staging and the entire visual effect. In 1900–1 Orlik had spent a year in Japan studying artistic techniques. This experience was decisive in the construction of a kabuki-style stage with a hanamichi (ramp) for the pantomime Sumurun ( 1910 ), a massive and wordless Reinhardt show performed in Berlin, Paris , London , and New York . Other set designs for Reinhardt included Oedipus the King ( 1910 ). Christopher...

Winter Garden

Winter Garden   Reference library

Samuel L. Leiter

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
198 words

...to suggest an English garden, it opened with a revue , La Belle Paree ( 1911 ), starring Al Jolson , who was long associated with the venue. A 1912 show, The Whirl of Society , featured a bridgeway that ran down the centre of the orchestra, something like a Japanese hanamichi , which allowed stars, especially Jolson and scantily dressed showgirls, to get much closer to the audience . Editions of The Passing Show , a Shubert -produced revue, were its chief occupants from 1912 to 1924 , with the era's greatest musical performers. The theatre's...

Kabuki

Kabuki   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
415 words

...are given only in the larger cities. The plays are performed on a wide, shallow platform which since c. 1760 has incorporated a revolving stage, later adopted by the Western theatre. Another characteristic of the kabuki theatre, taken from the nō play, is the hana-michi , or ‘flower way’, running along the left-hand wall of the auditorium to the stage at the level of the spectators' heads. Along this the actors make their entrances and exits, or withdraw for an aside. They wear rich brocaded costumes for historical parts, plain dress for...

Kabuki Theater

Kabuki Theater   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
2,803 words

...(the hanamichi ). Situated on the stage right side of the house, the hanamichi was originally paired with a narrower one on stage left, but the use of two runways is only seen today in special revivals. The runway is used for all major exits and entrances. It is often the locale of important processions, and important pieces of acting are performed at a spot on it seven-tenths the distance from the rear of the theater to the stage. An elevator trap is also found at this spot, used for magical entrances and disappearances. [See Hanamichi .] Kabuki ...

shingeki

shingeki   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
691 words

...By the beginning of the twentieth century it was clear that kabuki had become impervious to change. ‘New’ became the buzzword, but * shimpa (new school), shin - kabuki (new kabuki), and shinkokugeki (new national theatre) retained many kabuki conventions like the * hanamichi runway and the female impersonator ( * onnagata ). In Japan the *director was promoted before a dramatic literature could develop fully. Both *Tsubouchi and *Osanai attempted to introduce Western plays, staging, and acting techniques, and to raise literary standards, but...

environmental theatre

environmental theatre   Reference library

The Companion to Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
555 words

...the audience. Such approaches range from the merely atmospheric, as when an auditorium is decorated to enhance mood but the relationship to the stage does not change; to the structural, as with ring-like stages that surround the audience, or projecting stages such as the * hanamichi of *kabuki theatre, or the futuristic projects of artists such as Walter Gropius which placed audiences in the midst of spherical theatre; to totally enveloping environments as in some *happenings and some of the work of *Grotowski , *Kantor , and others in which all...

environmental theatre

environmental theatre   Reference library

Arnold Aronson

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
587 words

...the audience. Such approaches may range from the merely atmospheric, as when an auditorium is decorated to enhance mood but the relationship to the stage does not change; to the structural, as with ring-like stages that surround the audience, or projecting stages such as the hanamichi of kabuki theatre, or the futuristic projects of artists such as Jacques Polieri , Frederick Kiesler , or Walter Gropius which placed audiences in the midst of spherical theatre; to totally enveloping environments as in some happenings and some of the work of Jerzy...

Yakko and Kawakami

Yakko and Kawakami   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
1,009 words

...style that there were reports that actors playing policemen and other villains were attacked by confused audience members. Kawakami married Yakko, a spirited, high-class Tokyo geisha. In 1896 , they raised funds to build the Kawakamiza , a European-style theater without the hanamichi (flower path) characteristic of kabuki theaters. Hoping to improve their flagging fortunes, husband and wife—along with a troupe of sixteen actors—embarked on a “study mission” to America and Europe in 1899 . In San Francisco, Yakko joined the female impersonators onstage,...

shingeki

shingeki   Reference library

M. Cody Poulton

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
792 words

...that kabuki had become impervious to change. ‘New’ became the buzzword. Various attempts to reform Japanese theatre, such as shimpa (new school), shin - kabuki (new kabuki), and shinkokugeki (new national theatre), nonetheless retained many kabuki conventions like the hanamichi runway and the female impersonator ( onnagata ). In Japan the cult of the director was promoted before a dramatic literature could develop fully. Both Tsubouchi Shōyō and Osanai Kaoru attempted to introduce Western plays, staging, and acting techniques to Japanese...

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