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great-souled man

Subject: Philosophy

The lofty character portrayed in Bk. iv of the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle. The great-souled man is of a distinguished situation, worthy of great things, ‘an extreme in respect of the ...

great-souled man

great-souled man   Reference library

C. C. W. Taylor

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
124 words

...-souled man . Greatness of soul (Greek megalopsukhia , rendered into Latin as magnanimitas ) is a self-referential evaluative disposition characteristic of Aristotle's virtuous agent, consisting in a proper sense of his own worth, manifesting itself in the desire to be honoured for his virtues by his equals (coupled with indifference to the opinion of inferiors) and in self-conscious dignity of demeanour (verging on pomposity to the modern eye). Despite the etymological connection, it is nearer to pride than to magnanimity; while the great-souled man...

great-souled man

great-souled man   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
138 words

...-souled man The lofty character portrayed in Bk. iv of the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle . The great-souled man is of a distinguished situation, worthy of great things, ‘an extreme in respect of the greatness of his claims, but a mean in respect of the rightness of them’, perfectly virtuous, good at conferring benefits but ashamed of receiving them, neither humble nor vain. The combination involves proper pride or magnanimity. With his slow step, deep voice, and level utterance, he does not appeal to everybody, but he represents Aristotle’s robust sense...

great-souled man

great-souled man  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
The lofty character portrayed in Bk. iv of the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle. The great-souled man is of a distinguished situation, worthy of great things, ‘an extreme in respect of the greatness ...
Women

Women   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,844 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to deny them as shame? Must her affections be bestowed but as the recompense of flattery received; not of merit discriminated? Must everything that she does be prescribed by rule? … Must nothing that is spontaneous, generous, intuitive, spring from her soul to her lips? Elinor's questions do not persuade the man she loves to do anything but pity her. Certainly they do not cause him to transfer his affections from the docile Juliet—herself the victim of much social and sexual prejudice. Elinor's demands remain unanswered in the novel; moreover, the comic form in...

Medicine

Medicine   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,985 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...conceit that is was the mad who were the truly great poets [ see *genius ]. Were there specifically Romantic attitudes towards health and sickness? Was illness given any distinctive meaning by the Romantics? Recent studies have demonstrated beyond doubt that many Romantics were deeply versed in medical and scientific knowledge. In certain respects sickness was seen by Romantic writers and artists not simply as a physical effect—not merely a breakdown of the body machine—but as an expression of the soul or personality, a view which paralleled some...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,432 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul: While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and the deep power of joy We see into the life of things. This is one of the triumphs of sentimental writing. The spiritual condition it celebrates comes through a regimen grounded in the senses. Harmony is (paradoxically?) a function of pleasure, whose increase transports one to a new sensual order—an order where one may at last experience ‘the life of things’. We must read this great passage in the simplest and most literal way. ‘Things’...

Psychology

Psychology   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,151 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...‘psychology’ did not refer to an established science and its practitioners, but to a wide variety of topics concerning mental life that engaged the attention of educated people. Referring to the study of the soul, the term was known on the Continent in the mid-seventeenth century, and was used by David Hartley ( 1705–57 ) in his Observations on Man ( 1749 ). Hartley was one of the earliest proponents in England of a physiological psychology that was based on the twin doctrines of particle vibrations within the nerves and the resultant mental association...

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual

Folklore, Customs, and Civic Ritual   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Between the heavens and earth were specific airborne creatures—real or (like dragons or the Seven Whistlers) imagined—which might be associated in quite different ways with misfortune, death, or the souls of the dead (e.g. unbaptized children). This, after all, was the intermediate sphere through which, before the Reformation, the transmigrating soul was believed to pass. On the one hand were particularly ‘sacred’ birds like robins or wrens, the killing of which (other than ritually) or the destruction of whose nests or eggs would bring misfortune on the...

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,935 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...is propounded in the Preface, relies on the associationist *psychology [39] of David Hartley ( 1705–57 ). Outside this context, the belief that ‘nature and the language of the sense’ are ‘The anchor of my purest thoughts, the nurse, / The guide, the guardian of my heart, and soul / Of all my moral being’ can appear more tenuous. The year in which Lyrical Ballads was first published, 1798 , saw a Britain engaged in *war [2] with France, and attempting to suppress Irish *rebellion and unrest over soaring bread prices and *famine . Measured against...

20b The History of the Book in Britain, 1801–1914

20b The History of the Book in Britain, 1801–1914   Reference library

Leslie Howsam

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,084 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...materials decreased. The culture of book production was transformed along with the technology. During the first quarter of the 19 th century, the bible and tract societies were among the few publishers interested in keeping the price of books low. Their concern was with saving souls, while a few other specialists in cheap books churned out reprints of the classics for the school and popular working-class markets. The leading London firms, meanwhile, provided luxurious volumes for the leisured upper-class reader and used copyright law to protect their...

Coriolanus

Coriolanus   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,020 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...its remodelling. In 2013 the fan frenzy around Tom Hiddleston ensured Josie Rourke’s Donmar production was packed to the rafters each night, though it was broadcast to cinemas around the world to relieve some of the pressure on the building’s aching joints and the bereft souls out in the cold. Hiddleston’s performance, variously and arrestingly characterized by composed charm and a willingness to explore complex emotional drives, divided opinion, with as many finding it unsuited to the austere gravity of the part as found it insightful and refreshing....

Othello

Othello   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,092 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...him on: Iago promises he will soon enjoy Desdemona so long as he is prepared to kill Cassio. 4.3 After supper, Othello, leaving to walk with Lodovico, bids Desdemona prepare for bed and dismiss Emilia. Undressing with Emilia’s help, Desdemona sings the Willow song (‘The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree’). The two women discuss infidelity, which Desdemona can hardly believe any woman would commit: Emilia, however, argues that wives should revenge themselves in kind against unfaithful husbands. 5.1 Iago sets Roderigo on to kill Cassio in the dark,...

3 The Ancient Book

3 The Ancient Book   Reference library

Craig Kallendorf

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,021 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...of the Dead , which contained burial ceremonies, prayers for the deceased, and speculations about what life beyond the grave held. Illustrations, which were added separately and are sometimes not integrated perfectly with the text, show scenes like the weighing of the deceased’s soul and the presentation of the deceased to Osiris by Horus. 4 The Hebrew book The earliest Hebrew writing goes back to the 15 th or 14 th centuries bc and is found on metal, pottery bowls, and an ostracon used as an abecedary. By the 10 th century, royal records were being kept,...

2 The Sacred Book

2 The Sacred Book   Reference library

Carl Olson

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,051 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...were written in the devanāgiri script (literally, the writing of the ‘city of the gods’). 6 Formative Buddhist tradition There is basic agreement among scholars of Buddhism that an extraordinary and charismatic man lived around the 6 th to 5 th centuries bc in India, during a period of profound political, social, and economic change. This man is Siddhārtha Gautama, who became known as the Buddha (enlightened one). Distressed by the fundamental problems of human existence, he discovered a solution to these difficulties, spent his life wandering from one...

Otis Redding

Otis Redding  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
B. 9 September 1941, Dawson, Georgia, USA, d. 10 December 1967, Lake Monona, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. The son of a Baptist minister with the same name, Redding assimilated gospel music ...
Unio Mystica

Unio Mystica  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The union of the mystic's soul with God. In many religious traditions the ultimate aim of man is for his soul to be absorbed in the transcendent—in theistic religious traditions, in God—and not only ...
East Asia

East Asia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Siberia, Mongolia, China, Japan, South-East AsiaBeyond the Great Wall of China a nomadic way of life has always prevailed. Across the endless wastes have roamed the herds belonging to the people of ...
Over-Soul

Over-Soul  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Essay by Emerson, published in Essays, First Series (1841). The Over-Soul is “that great nature in which we rest … that Unity within which every man's particular being is contained and made one with ...
Dicaearchus

Dicaearchus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Of Messana,Greek polymath and prolific writer, pupil of Aristotle and contemporary of Theophrastus and Aristoxenus: fl. c.320–300 bc. Fragments only survive of his works, but they show a remarkable ...
Man Without a Country

Man Without a Country  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Story by E. E. Hale, published in the Atlantic Monthly (1863), reprinted in pamphlet form (1865), and collected in If, Yes, and Perhaps (1868). Written to inspire patriotism during the Civil War, it ...

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