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Overview

grand narrative

Subject: Literature

[French grands récits ‘big stories’] Lyotard's term for the totalizing narratives or metadiscourses of modernity which have provided ideologies with a legitimating philosophy of ...

grand narrative

grand narrative   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... narrative ( grand récit ) Jean-François Lyotard ’s term for ideas, concepts, notions, or beliefs which can function to legitimate certain social actions and practices. For instance, the notion of revolution, since the French Revolution, has served to legitimate large-scale programmes of social change. Similarly, the notion of Enlightenment has served to legitimate a movement toward secular reason. Such grand narratives no longer function, according to Lyotard who defines the postmodern age as being characterized by incredulity towards all grand...

grand narrative

grand narrative   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... narrative A term imperfectly translated from Jean-François Lyotard ’s influential account of postmodernism in La Condition postmoderne ( 1979 ), in which he condemns big bad ‘totalizing’ theories and systems of thought, principally Marxism and Hegelianism. These are ‘big stories’ ( grands récits ) which claim to explain everything, whereas the postmodern condition, by which Lyotard means the hoped-for next phase of thought, will be characterized by a rejection of such systems in favour of harmless micro-narratives ( petits récits ) that do not make any...

grand narrative

grand narrative   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... narrative Used by postmodernists as a term to attack social theories that have a big theme, such as the idea that the development of social work resulted from increasing concern on the part of the state for the welfare of its citizens, or that it was an increasingly sophisticated means of ensuring their social control....

grand narrative

grand narrative ([Th])   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Archaeology
Length:
75 words

... narrative [Th] A broad and overarching story, totalizing in its extent, that gives order and structure to many small pieces of evidence or experiences within a broad conceptual scheme supporting knowledge with historical or contextual meanings. Such narratives, also known as metanarratives, are seen as the product of modernist thinking and have been heavily criticized by postmodernists including Jean-François Lyotard, who advocated a focus on specific local contexts and the diversity of human...

grand narrative

grand narrative  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[French grands récits ‘big stories’]Lyotard's term for the totalizing narratives or metadiscourses of modernity which have provided ideologies with a legitimating philosophy of history. For example, ...
grand narratives

grand narratives   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
131 words

... narratives ( metanarratives , master narratives ) [French grands récits ‘big stories’] Lyotard’s term for the totalizing narratives or metadiscourses of modernity which have provided ideologies with a legitimating philosophy of history. For example, the grand narratives of the Enlightenment , democracy, and Marxism . White suggests that there are four Western master narratives: Greek fatalism, Christian redemptionism, bourgeois progressivism, and Marxist utopianism. Lyotard argues that such authoritarian universalizing narratives are no longer...

The Impact of Meso-Level Assumptions on Grand Theorizing: Using Unit, State, and Regime Type for Constructing IR’s Historical Narratives (and Theory-Building)

The Impact of Meso-Level Assumptions on Grand Theorizing: Using Unit, State, and Regime Type for Constructing IR’s Historical Narratives (and Theory-Building)   Reference library

Daniel M. Green

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Empirical International Relations Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
12,420 words

...the anarchy assumption ( Donnelly, 2015 ; Gunitsky, 2013 ; Lake, 2009 ; Mattern & Zarakol, 2016 ). 2 Narratives of history are important. The epigraphs quoted at the beginning of this article assure us that periodization and grand historical narratives are vitally consequential, establishing the very parameters in which IR scholars labor, speculate, and theorize. Therefore, we should be highly attentive to how we produce these narratives. Yet there is a surprising lack of reflection on general practices in such matters. One common method that...

Painting

Painting   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,778 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to paint a narrative of The Progress of Human Culture on the walls of the Great Room of the Royal Society of Arts in the Strand. He planned to turn this huge series, which he had agreed to execute for free, into a commercial loss-leader, which would be financially redeemed after its completion by a one-man exhibition of the finished paintings, and by the sale of engravings after them. The exhibition opened in April 1783 , followed by a second a year later, and was accompanied by a catalogue dramatizing Barry's noble conception, grand style, and unusual...

1 & 2 Samuel

1 & 2 Samuel   Reference library

Gwilym H. Jones, Gwilym H. Jones, and Gwilym H. Jones

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
44,450 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...(1984), 1 & 2 Samuel, Old Testament Guides (Sheffield: JSOT). ———(1986), 1 & 11 Samuel: A Commentary , Library of Biblical Interpretation (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan). Grønbaek, J. H. (1971), Die Geschichte vom Aufstieg Davids (1 Sam 15–2 Sam 5): Tradition und Komposition , ATDan 10 (Copenhagen: Munksgaard). Gunn, D. M. (1976), ‘Traditional Composition in the “Succession Narrative”’, VT 26: 214–19. ———‘Narrative Patterns and Oral Tradition in Judges and Samuel’, VT 24: 286–317. ———(1978), The Story of King David: Genre and Interpretation , JSOTSup 6...

Exploration

Exploration   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,825 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Round the World , deriving from his participation in Cook's second voyage. Forster's anthropologically sophisticated exposition is of particular interest for its reading of Pacific societies in terms of European political debates, and for an uneasy synthesis of two grand, temporal narratives. On the one hand, there is something like the evolutionary time usually taken to be characteristic of nineteenth-century Darwinism. Not only does Forster imagine savage and barbaric societies in terms of stages, but he likens their progression from animality through...

Acts

Acts   Reference library

Loveday Alexander and Loveday Alexander

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
42,037 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the growth in popularity of a less pretentious narrative genre, the Greek novel, and it has been suggested that Acts is a form of novel. Certainly many readers unaccustomed to biblical narrative might take the book as a novel, with its exotic settings, adventurous plot, framework of travel, and explicit religious ideology. Luke shows some inclination to novelistic narrative techniques in the elaboration of his more dramatic scenes (cf. e.g. acts 12:6–11 ), and the novel throws valuable light on Luke's narrative structure and textures. But there are also many...

Ruth

Ruth   Reference library

Grace I. Emmerson and Grace I. Emmerson

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
4,704 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the narrative is open to question. It is, however, arguable on literary grounds that the names of the genealogy form a counterpart to the tragic names of ch. 1 . From a tale of death and bereavement they point to a glorious future. In the canonical context their importance lies in giving the story a wider significance than the purely domestic, and in introducing the promise of hope after the despair with which the book of Judges ends. References Campbell, E. F. (1975) Ruth (New York: Doubleday). Hubbard Jr., R. L. (1988), The Book of Ruth , NICOT (Grand...

Jeremiah

Jeremiah   Reference library

Kathleen M. O'Connor and Kathleen M. O'Connor

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
48,981 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...message. Baruch's reward is not grand but it is precious. He will survive. He will gain his life ‘as a prize of war’, wherever he goes ( v. 5 ). With this lament and response, the main part of the book closes on a sombre note. Baruch is the world-weary survivor who is promised only his life, not escape, not return, not restoration of fortunes. Only life, endurance through difficulties, that is the prize in the midst of exhaustion from the disaster that will come ‘upon all flesh’ ( v. 5 ). The Baruch narratives end with a most chastened hope that leaves...

Epilogue

Epilogue   Reference library

John Rogerson

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,761 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...understood in a temporal or a structural sense. Understood as a temporal term, ‘postmodern’ denotes a period of time that has succeeded the ‘modern’ period. Understood structurally, ‘postmodern’ denotes features of thought that are not necessarily new, such as a distrust of grand narratives, but which are in conflict with what are often, perhaps unfairly, regarded as legacies of the Enlightenment. My own view is that it is more accurate to say with Anthony Giddens, in his Modernity and Self-Identity , that we are living in late modernity, and that the...

1700 to the Present

1700 to the Present   Reference library

Ronald Clements

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,692 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
18

...of preaching, echoes of which are still recognizable in the form of the gospel narratives. The second path followed up suggestions set out a century earlier, arguing that many of the sayings of Jesus, especially in the presumed ‘teaching source’ that lies behind the gospels of St Matthew and St Luke, showed evidence of their translation from an Aramaic, or Hebrew, original. The third path was directed towards a revised study of the overlaps and interrelationships of the narrative contents of the first three gospels, thereby carrying into new areas problems...

Luke

Luke   Reference library

Eric Franklin and Eric Franklin

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
46,452 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...disciplines. Others (‘many’ may be for stylistic effect) have written ‘narratives’, that is purposefully ordered accounts, and Luke joins his own to theirs, not without a hint that he is offering an improvement. The subject of these narratives is ‘the events that have been fulfilled among us’. They are not disinterested accounts but their contents are viewed as the outcome of God's purposes and, probably, as the fulfilment of earlier expectations. The sources for these narratives were ‘eyewitnesses and servants of the word’, most probably a single group...

Introduction to the Old Testament

Introduction to the Old Testament   Reference library

John Barton

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,263 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...material, much wider than the contents of the NT, embracing every aspect of the social and political life of ancient Israel and post-exilic Judaism. The variety can be suggested by looking briefly at some of the genres of literature to be found there. 2. Narrative. More than half the OT consists of narrative, that is, the consecutive description of events set in the past. It is hard to distinguish between what we might call history, legend, saga, myth, folktale, or fiction. There are passages in the books of Kings which seem to be excerpts from official...

The New Testament

The New Testament   Reference library

Margaret Davies

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
10,686 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
5

...there are short expressions of poetry and proverbs within New Testament books. Once we begin to notice these features, we realize that the present form of our New Testament is neither arbitrary nor entirely accidental. Moreover, the whole Bible has been read as a grand all- encompassing narrative, a divine comedy, according to which human beings are created by the generous God to live in a beneficent world, but human ‘hardness of heart’, expressed in neglect of this creator, violence towards others, and greed, led to their alienation from God, each other, and...

The Comedy of Errors

The Comedy of Errors   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,835 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...was played by the players’ during the Christmas revels at Gray’s Inn on 28 December 1594 : this can only have been Shakespeare’s play, which is indeed based on Plautus ’ comedy Menaechmi , and it is unlikely that the lawyers and students would have hired actors to appear at a grand festive occasion with anything but a new, or at least current, play. Although this debt to classical farce has inclined some scholars to see the play as apprentice work from the very start of Shakespeare’s career, stylistic tests confirm a dating around 1594 , with rare...

Timon of Athens

Timon of Athens   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,245 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by another adaptation in 1771 , by Richard Cumberland , who deprived Timon of his rival girlfriends (times had changed) and instead provided a virtuous daughter Evanthe, whose amorous complications with Alcibiades and Lucius fill out the plot. Spranger Barry played Timon in a grand Drury Lane production staged by Garrick , but it lasted for only eleven performances. A subsequent reworking of Shadwell’s adaptation by Thomas Hull ( 1786 ) achieved only one. In 1816 George Lamb attempted to restore Shakespeare’s text, though he left some of Cumberland’s...

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