You are looking at 1-20 of 119 entries  for:

  • All: glitch x
clear all

View:

Overview

glitch

An intermittent transient fault that occurs when two communicating asynchronous processes fail to complete their hardware interface protocol. It is usually caused by a flip-flop in a ...

glitch

glitch   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... An intermittent transient fault that occurs when two communicating asynchronous processes fail to complete their hardware interface protocol . It is usually caused by a flip-flop in a metastable...

glitch

glitch   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... An abrupt disturbance in the regular train of pulses from a pulsar, appearing as a sudden decrease in the pulsar’s period (i.e. a speed-up in rotation), accompanied by an increase of the spin-down rate which gradually returns to its former value over a few weeks or months. Glitches tend to occur in younger pulsars whose rate of spin is slowing rapidly, notably the Crab Pulsar and Vela Pulsar. They are believed to be caused by the sudden release of stress energy either in the crust (a starquake ) or between the crust and the superfluid interior....

glitch

glitch   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
46 words

... • bewitch , bitch, ditch, enrich, fitch, flitch, glitch, hitch, itch, kitsch, Mitch, pitch, quitch, rich, snitch, stitch, switch, titch, twitch, which, witch • Redditch • Greenwich • eldritch • ostrich • backstitch • hemstitch • topstitch • Shostakovich • tsarevich • Sandwich • dipswitch ,...

glitch

glitch noun   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
51 words

... noun A sudden brief irregularity or malfunction (of equipment, etc., esp. orig in a spacecraft); also, something causing this. 1962 –. Product Engineering It generated digital transients that caused the abort guidance to send false signals. Phillips said it took an inordinately long time to find this glitch ( 1969 ). [Origin...

glitch

glitch   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
56 words

... [1960s] Although nowadays a glitch can be any kind of hitch or snag, the word was originally used by US electronic engineers in the 1960s to mean ‘a sudden surge of electrical current’. Astronauts began using the word to talk about any sudden malfunction of equipment. It may derive from Yiddish glitsh ‘a slippery...

glitch

glitch n.   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
205 words

... n. [Ger. glitschen , to slip, via Yid. glitshen , to slide or skid; orig. mainframe computer jargon glitch , ‘a sudden interruption in electric service, sanity, continuity, or program function’ ( New Hacker's Dict. , 1992 ). This was adopted c. 1960 by astronauts, who gave it the more general definition, and it moved into mainstream sl. with the spread of the personal computer culture] a hitch, a snag, a malfunction. 1962 J. Glenn in Into Orbit 86: Another term we adopted to describe some of our problems was ‘glitch’. Literally, a glitch is...

glitch

glitch n   Reference library

Oxford Business French Dictionary: English-French

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
5 words
glitch

glitch n   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Italian Dictionary: English-Italian (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
7 words
glitch

glitch n   Reference library

Oxford Business Spanish Dictionary: English-Spanish

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
7 words
glitch

glitch   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
119 words
glitch

glitch n   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford-Hachette French Dictionary: English-French (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
13 words
glitch

glitch   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
127 words
glitch

glitch noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
20 words
glitch

glitch noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
20 words
glitch

glitch noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
25 words
glitch

glitch  

An intermittent transient fault that occurs when two communicating asynchronous processes fail to complete their hardware interface protocol. It is usually caused by a flip-flop in a metastable state.
glitch

glitch  

An abrupt disturbance in the regular train of pulses from a pulsar, appearing as a sudden decrease in the pulsar's period (i.e. a speed-up in rotation), accompanied by an increase of the spin-down ...
Neologisms

Neologisms   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
276 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...perfectly comfortable today with terms such as workaholic ( 1971 ), talk radio ( 1972 ), couch potato ( 1973 ), PC (a personal computer in the 1980s, political correctness in the 1990s), sound bite ( 1980 ), and terms from the 1950s and 1960s such as do-it-yourself , glitch , mall , meritocracy , middle management , nitty-gritty , and prime time . For an excellent discussion about speculating on the success of neologisms, see Allan Metcalf , Predicting New Words ( 2002 ). Neologism is pronounced /nee- ahl -ә-jiz-әm/ —not /nee-ә- loh...

Margo (00s)

Margo (00s)  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
French glitch-pop trio Margo’s debut, The Catnap, was originally released in 2002 on the Rennes-based Peter, I’m Flying! label, and Jean Francois Lecoq (electronics/guitars), Mélanie Massons ...
asynchronous

asynchronous  

Involving or requiring a form of computer control timing protocol in which a specific operation is begun upon receipt of an indication (signal) that the preceding operation has been completed, and ...

View: