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glaistig

Subject: Religion

[green maiden]. Usually malevolent solitary female fairy haunting lonely pools in Scottish Gaelic tradition. Sometimes half-woman, half-goat, she may take the form of a beautiful woman, ...

glaistig

glaistig   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... , glaestig , glastig ; also maighdean uaine [green maiden]. Usually malevolent solitary female fairy haunting lonely pools in Scottish Gaelic tradition. Sometimes half-woman, half- goat , she may take the form of a beautiful woman, especially one already known to the male victim; after offering sexual favours like a camp follower, she leaves her male victim with his throat cut, every drop of blood sucked from him. Often compared to the Russian baba yaga, the glaisting none the less conflates characteristics of other Highland imaginary creatures,...

glaistig

glaistig noun   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
36 words

... noun (also glastick ) E20 Gaelic . A fairy with a variety of forms and characters, frequently appearing in the shape of a goat or as half woman, half goat, but also as a beautiful water...

glaistig

glaistig  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[green maiden]. Usually malevolent solitary female fairy haunting lonely pools in Scottish Gaelic tradition. Sometimes half-woman, half-goat, she may take the form of a beautiful woman, especially ...
fuath

fuath  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[ScG, hatred, aversion; cf. OIr. fúath, hate; likeness].Generic term for a class of spectral monsters in Highland Gaelic folklore, usually having a close connection with water, lochs, rivers, and ...
ùruisg

ùruisg  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Solitary fairy of Scottish Gaelic tradition, a subspecies of the fuath, half-man and half-goat, but not satyr-like, despite appearances. In many ways, the ùruisg is a rougher, hirsute brownie, given ...
glaestig

glaestig   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Variant spelling of glaistig...

glastig

glastig   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Variant spelling of glaistig...

fuath

fuath   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...lochs, rivers, and often the open sea. Sometimes known as the arrachd or fuath-arrachd. A fuath is the mother of the brollachan . Highland subspecies of the fuath include the beithir , fideal , peallaidh , and ùruisg . Vough is a phonetic anglicization. See also ARRACH ; GLAISTIG . Folk motifs: F420.5.2;...

ùruisg

ùruisg   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...would be left vacant for him; he was lucky to have around. The ùruisg craves human companionship but almost always frightens people away with his unseemly appearance. He was also known to haunt lonely and sequestered places, notably a certain corrie near Loch Katrine. See also GLAISTIG ; FUATH ; PEALLAIDH . In spoken Scottish Gaelic the term ùruisg might also denote a diviner who foretells future events, or a savage-looking...

goat

goat   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...god, is pictured both with goat legs and riding on a goat. A small bronze image of a goat with huge horns was found in south-west Scotland in the 1970s. Many frightening creatures in folklore are wholly or partially goat: the Irish bocanách ; the Manx goayr heddagh ; Scottish glaistig (half-woman) and ùruisg (half-man). The monstrous goathead people [ Gaborchend Goborchind , etc.] in Irish folklore possibly derive from the Fomorians . On the other hand, the more benign Irish pooka (or púca) takes its name from the word for hegoat, poc. The Welsh hero ...

banshee

banshee   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...associations, a banshee's attentions to a family were thought to be a mark of high station, especially in Ireland, and several hundred families boasted of their own banshee. A Welsh counterpart is the cyhyraeth . See also AÍBELL ; ANGAU ; ANKOU ; CLÍDNA ; DEATH COACH ; GLAISTIG ; WASHER AT THE FORD . Patricia Lysaght , ‘Irish Banshee Traditions’, Béaloideas , 42–4 (1974–6); ‘An Bhean Chaointe: The Supernatural Woman in Irish Folklore’, Éire-Ireland , 14 (4) (Winter 1979), 7–29; The Banshee: The Supernatural Death-Messenger (Dublin,...

fairy

fairy   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...death. Among those fairies classed as solitary are the banshee , baobhan sith , brownie , bwci , cadineag , caoineag , caointeag , cluricaune , dooiney marrey , dooiney oie , dullahan , ellyll , fairy lover [Ir. leannán sídhe/sí ] , fenodyree , fr'de/fridean , glaistig , gruagach , leprechaun, piskie , pooka , pwca , síabraid , s'thich . In defining the two divisions W. B. Yeats ( 1888 ) introduced the term ‘trooping fairies’ for those perceived to be in groups; they may also be known as social fairies, the sociable fairies, the fairy...

glastick

glastick   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
4 words

...variant of glaistig...

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