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ghoul

Subject: Literature

An evil spirit or phantom, especially one supposed to rob graves and feed on dead bodies. Recorded from the late 18th century, the word comes from Arabic ġūl, a desert demon believed to ...

Ghoul

Ghoul   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children's Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature, Children's literature studies
Length:
95 words

... . The ghoul—an undead creature that feeds on freshly buried corpses—originated in Arabic folklore. Ghouls belong to the more demonic side of the spirit world, jinn , and are sometimes associated with vampires. They have been invoked as a device for frightening disobedient children, but they do not act with intelligence or will of their own—although some ghouls attempt to trick travelers in order to attack them. In Haitian folklore, ghouls, or zombies, are reanimated corpses whose sole purpose is to serve the person who summoned them from the grave. Anthony...

Ghoul

Ghoul   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... (Arabic ghūl , from ghāla , ‘to seize’) An evil spirit that robs graves and devours corpses. The word and the concept were acquired from Arabic in the late 18th century. More recently the term has been broadened out to apply to someone who takes a morbid interest in macabre things, especially someone who goes and gawps at road accidents, murder scenes,...

ghoul

ghoul   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
8 words

... demon preying on corpses. XVIII. — Arab. ġūl...

ghoul

ghoul   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... , ghoulish . Ghoul , meaning (1) ‘an evil spirit’ and (2) ‘a person morbidly interested in death’, is pronounced gool . Ghoulish similarly rhymes with foolish...

ghoul

ghoul   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...ghoul , ghoulish . Pronounced /ɡuːl(iʃ)/ rhyming with fool(ish) , not owl(ish)....

ghoul

ghoul   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... an evil spirit or phantom, especially one supposed to rob graves and feed on dead bodies. Recorded from the late 18th century, the word comes from Arabic ġūl , a desert demon believed to rob graves and devour...

ghoul

ghoul   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
110 words

... • Banjul , befool, Boole, boule, boules, boulle, cagoule, cool, drool, fool, ghoul, Joule, mewl, misrule, mule, O'Toole, pool, Poole, pul, pule, Raoul, rule, school, shul, sool, spool, Stamboul, stool, Thule, tomfool, tool, tulle, you'll, yule • mutule • kilojoule • playschool • intercool • Blackpool • ampoule ( US ampule) • cesspool • Hartlepool • Liverpool • whirlpool • ferrule , ferule • curule • homeschool • cucking-stool • faldstool • toadstool • footstool • animalcule • granule • capsule • ridicule • molecule • minuscule • fascicule •...

ghoul

ghoul n. (US)   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
334 words

... n. ( US ) 1 ( US Und./police ) a man who attempts to blackmail a woman who is deceiving her husband. 1859 Matsell Vocabulum 36: ghouls Fellows who watch assignation-houses, and follow females that come out of them to their homes and then threaten to expose them to their husbands, relatives, or friends, if they refuse to give them not only money, but also the use of their bodies. 1927 ‘Jargon of the Und.’ in DN V 447: Ghoul , A blackmailer who follows a woman as she leaves an assignation house. 2 a grave robber. 1927 (con. 1878 ) H....

ghoul

ghoul noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
66 words
ghoul

ghoul n   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Spanish Dictionary: English-Spanish (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
14 words
ghoul

ghoul noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
78 words
ghoul

ghoul noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
53 words
ghoul

ghoul noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
48 words
ghoul

ghoul noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
48 words
ghoul

ghoul  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
An evil spirit or phantom, especially one supposed to rob graves and feed on dead bodies. Recorded from the late 18th century, the word comes from Arabic ġūl, a desert demon believed to rob graves ...
Scottish Local and Family History

Scottish Local and Family History   Quick reference

David moody

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,622 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...it was primarily an oral culture, and a Gaelic one too , and the family historians were the sennachies who recited the genealogies of clan chiefs, as their equivalents in other oral cultures have done in many parts of the world. Gaeldom has its fair share of second sight, ghouls, and ghosties, plus a liberal helping of Celtic twilight—in all, too much for most Scottish (non‐Gaelic‐speaking) historians to come to terms with. History in Gaelic itself is of the Homeric variety; Derick Thomson and C. W. J. Withers are authors to guide students through...

Addams Family

Addams Family  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
In the cartoons of Charles Addams (1912–88), a family of ghouls including Morticia and her husband Gomez, living in a gothic house on Cemetery Ridge.
Ulalume

Ulalume  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Poem by Poe, published in the American Whig Review (Dec. 1847). This lyrical poem, called by Poe a ballad, expresses the writer's grief over the death of his beloved “Ulalume,” and in its first ...
Marina Warner

Marina Warner  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1946– ),novelist, critic, and historian of ideas, born in London and educated at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. Her novels, which cover a wide cultural and geographical range, include In a Dark Wood ...
everywhen

everywhen adv   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Science Fiction

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... P. Anderson Time Patrol Time Patrol (1991) 3 “You're going to be a kind of policeman.” “Yeah? Where?” “Everywhere. And everywhen.” 1965 C. D. Simak All Flesh Is Grass (1979) 148 So they went everywhere for fun, I thought. And everywhen, perhaps. They were temporal ghouls, feeding on the past. 2000 D. Eddings & L. Eddings Redemption of Althalus 230 You told us that the House is everywhere—all at the same time […]. It's everywhen then, too, isn't it? What I'm getting at is that there's probably a door to last week somewhere in the House—or...

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