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Overview

gentrification

The rebuilding, renewing, and rehabilitation of depressed areas of the inner city as more affluent families seek to live near to the city centre, trading space and quiet for access to the ...

gentrification

gentrification   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
20 words

... Migration of middle classes into former working-class areas, with a resulting change of character, e.g. modernization/repair of old...

gentrification

gentrification   Reference library

Dictionary of the Social Sciences

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
88 words

... A process of neighborhood change that involves the influx of middle-class and upper-class residents into poor neighborhoods, with the accompanying renovation of the housing stock. Gentrification is associated with the revitalization of urban centers, many of which suffered long-term economic decline in the context of suburbanization and other demographic shifts, beginning in the 1950s. In the United States, gentrification often has racial overtones insofar as the central-city neighborhoods most often involved are generally home to minority...

gentrification

gentrification   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Geogr. Studs 42, 2 writes that gentrification provides a cleaner and more positive identity. Walks and Maaranen (2008) Urb. Geog. 29, 4 demonstrate that gentrification is followed by declining, rather than improving, levels of social mix, ethnic diversity, and immigrant concentration within affected neighbourhoods: ‘at the same time, gentrification is implicated in the growth of neighbourhood income polarization and inequality’. See Latham (2003) Urban Studies 40, 9 on multiculturalism and gentrification. Lees (2000) PHG 24 and D. Ley (...

gentrification

gentrification   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
427 words

... The combination of demographic and economic changes accompanying sustained reinvestment in inner urban areas, although it has also been used in rural contexts ( see rural gentrification ). By implication, the social character of the neighbourhood changes, affecting shops, restaurants, places of worship, and public spaces. Gentrification in its initial narrow sense of the occupation and renovation or upgrading of dwellings in working-class inner city neighbourhoods by the middle-classes, was identified by sociologist Ruth Glass in 1964 , based on...

gentrification

gentrification   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
47 words

... The upgrading of decaying, normally inner-city housing, involving physical renovation, the displacement of low-status occupants by higher-income groups, and (frequently) tenure change from private rental to home ownership. The term was first used by the British urban sociologist Ruth Glass ( London: Aspects of Change ,...

gentrification

gentrification   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...gentrification The social and economic transformation of inner city slums into expensive housing for affluent professional people by architectural improvements, modernizing and improving kitchens and bathrooms, etc. Generally regarded as a desirable form of urban renewal , the process can have adverse consequences for former occupants whose social networks are disrupted and who may be left homeless or forced to relocate to accommodation that is distant from their workplace, requiring costly and time-consuming commuting. ...

Gentrification

Gentrification   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... The process by which a working-class or decayed urban area, especially in the inner city, is made middle-class. The term has been ascribed to the Marxist urban geographer Ruth Glass , who used it in an article of 1964 , but it did not become generally familiar until the early 1970s, when the professional middle classes began to buy homes in traditional working-class city areas. Their aim was to restore and renovate the properties to suit their tastes, and this in turn led to a change in character of the area as a whole, so that shops went...

rural gentrification

rural gentrification   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
109 words

...gentrification The gentrification of small villages and towns in rural areas, as well as the restoration of individual dwellings. Traditionally, gentrification has been considered a highly urban process, particularly relating to large towns and cities. The same processes of gentrification, such as the reinvestment of capital, social upgrading of a locale by incoming higher-income groups, landscape change and upgrading, and displacement of indigenous low-income groups, take place in some rural locations. These locations are usually within commuting ...

gentrification

gentrification   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...but relatively few businesses targeted their custom because of their inferior spending power, so their presence was masked. Islington (and specifically the Barnsbury locality) is often identified as the first part of London to have undergone widespread gentrification. The ‘gentrification’ of Barnsbury is legendary and had regrettable social consequences. But it showed beyond question that redevelopment of overcrowded housing was not the only option. graham towers : Shelter is Not Enough ( 2000 ) In areas with vacant commercial premises, a...

Gentrification

Gentrification   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... . The process by which a working-class or decayed urban area, especially in the inner city, is made middle-class. The term has been ascribed to the Marxist urban geographer Ruth Glass , who used it in an article of 1964 , but it did not become generally familiar until the early 1970s, when the professional middle classes began to buy homes in traditional working-class city areas. Their aim was to restore and renovate the properties to suit their tastes, and this in turn led to a change in character of the area as a whole, so that shops went...

Gentrification in the United States

Gentrification in the United States   Reference library

Suleiman Osman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
8,708 words

... The Gentrification Debates (New York: Routledge, 2010). 2. For an overview of the debate over how to define gentrification, see Loretta Lees , Tom Slater , and Elvin Wyly , eds. “Introduction,” in The Gentrification Reader (London and New York: Routledge, 2010), xv–xvi, 3–6 . See also Robert A. Beauregard , “The Chaos and Complexity of Gentrification,” in Gentrification of the City , ed. Neil Smith and Peter Williams (Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1986), 35–55 ; and Eric Clark , “The Order and Simplicity of Gentrification,” in Gentrification in a...

gentrification

gentrification n   Reference library

Oxford Business French Dictionary: English-French

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
5 words
gentrification

gentrification noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
84 words
gentrification

gentrification noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
88 words
gentrification

gentrification  

The rebuilding, renewing, and rehabilitation of depressed areas of the inner city as more affluent families seek to live near to the city centre, trading space and quiet for access to the goods and ...
rent gap

rent gap  

The gap between the actual rent paid for a piece of land and the rent that could be collected if the land had a ‘higher’ use. The idea is central to, but does not entirely explain, gentrification; ...
inner city

inner city  

An ill-defined term describing the central business and commercial zone of a city, sometimes used when this zone has decayed as businesses and commercial activity have relocated to suburban malls ...
filtering down

filtering down  

The movement of progressively poorer people into housing stock. It is suggested that when the rich move away from the city to newly built houses, the next social and occupational class moves in. ...
Marxist geography

Marxist geography  

A theory and methodology for understanding the political economy of the world—and changing it. It highlights the dialectical processes between the natural environment, spatial relationships, and ...
Business Improvement Districts

Business Improvement Districts  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(BIDs)A strategy for mobilizing private funding in order to improve the environment of city centres. By 1997 over 1000 Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) or Zones had been created in the USA and ...

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