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geese

Subject: History

All one's geese are swans one characteristically exaggerates the merits of undistinguished persons or things; the use of goose and swan to point up such a contrast dates back to the 16th ...

geese

geese   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
129 words

... Geese were kept in small numbers except in Norfolk. In his Tour through the Whole Island of Great Britain ( 1724–6 ) Daniel Defoe observed that geese and turkeys were driven in ‘prodigious numbers’ from ‘the farthest parts of Norfolk’ to London. He had met droves of 1 000–2 000. ‘They begin to drive them generally in August, by which time the harvest is almost over, and the geese may feed in the stubbles as they go. Thus they hold on to the end of October, when the roads begin to be too stiff and deep for their broad feet and short legs to march in.’...

Wild Geese

Wild Geese   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Literature
Length:
122 words

...Geese , the, Irish soldiers serving in Europe following the evacuation of the Irish army to France under the terms of the Treaty of Limerick, 1691 , as well as the succeeding waves of recruits to Irish brigades in Continental armies of the 18th cent. and—by extension—in American and Latin American wars of later periods. Typically the ‘Wild Geese’ went either to France, where Irish troops formed a distinct Irish Brigade , to Spain, which also had specifically Irish regiments in its army, or, in smaller numbers, to Austria and Hungary. The most prominent...

wild geese

wild geese   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
38 words

...geese , a term applied to those leaving Ireland to serve in foreign armies during the 18th century. It is mentioned, as a term requiring explanation and hence possibly new, in an official letter of 1726 . Hiram...

‘Wild Geese’

‘Wild Geese’   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
58 words

...Geese’ was the name given to catholic Irish professional soldiers who served in the armies of European sovereigns, especially after the conclusion of the Williamite war ( 1689–91 ) in Ireland. In fact connections of this kind long pre‐dated 1691 , but the treaty of Limerick of 1691 sent 12,000 Irish troops to join the French...

‘Wild Geese’

‘Wild Geese’   Reference library

Bruce Philip Lenman

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
132 words

...Geese’ was the name given to catholic Irish professional soldiers who served in the armies of European sovereigns, especially after the conclusion of the Williamite war ( 1689–91 ) in Ireland. In fact connections of this kind long pre-dated 1691 , but the treaty of Limerick of 1691 sent 12,000 Irish troops to join the French army, and thereafter the combination of discouragement at home and opportunity abroad kept the flow of men going. They served with distinction in the armies of France, Austria, and Spain. Their leaders inevitably began to be...

flying geese theory

flying geese theory   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...geese theory An East Asian variety of modernization theory , which argues that East Asian economies have followed Japan’s economic development pathway of import substitution-cum-export promotion and the progression from crude and simple goods to complex and refined goods. See Schoeppel and Mariko (2002) Japanstudien 14, 203 . www.gsb.columbia.edu/cjeb/research Ozawa ( 2010 ) provides a thorough critique of the theory at Columbia University...

MacFarlane’s geese

MacFarlane’s geese   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...geese According to the proverb: ‘MacFarlane’s geese like their play better than their meat.’ The wild geese of Inchtavoe (Loch Lomond) used to be called MacFarlane’s geese because the MacFarlanes had a house on the island, and it is said that the geese never returned after the destruction of the house. One day James VI visited the chieftain and was highly amused by the gambols of the geese, but one served at table was so tough that the king exclaimed: ‘MacFarlane’s geese like their play better than their...

Swans, Geese, and Ducks

Swans, Geese, and Ducks   Reference library

The New Encyclopedia of Birds

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
7,418 words
Illustration(s):
11

...and sustain her and her attendant mate on arrival. Stable isotope studies have used distinct chemical signatures in the food and tissues of Snow geese to demonstrate that female geese use these body stores, supplemented by food obtained at or near the ultimate breeding grounds, to produce the eggs and help sustain the female through incubation. Even geese breeding in the High Arctic such as brant and Greater snow geese, which were thought originally to nest very soon after arrival on the nesting grounds, have now been shown to spend one to three weeks after...

‘Flight of Wild Geese, A’

‘Flight of Wild Geese, A’   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
173 words

...of Wild Geese, A’ , a highly regarded poem by Harold Stewart , published in his first volume of verse, Phoenix Wings ( 1948 ), depicts an imaginary incident concerning Wu Tao–tzu , the great Chinese artist who was commissioned by the Emperor Ming Huang of the T'ang Dynasty to paint a landscape roll. The poem's opening gloss indicates that Wu so enters into the spirit of the scene that he can walk about in the picture at will. One day he wanders over a distant mountain in the roll and is never seen again. During his wanderings Wu meets Chang...

geese

geese   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...geese > goose ...

Geese

Geese (101)   Reference library

Dictionary of American Family Names

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
7 words

... (101) German: variant spelling of Giese ....

geese

geese   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... all one's geese are swans one characteristically exaggerates the merits of undistinguished persons or things; the use of goose and swan to point up such a contrast dates back to the 16th century (in early use, crow was also used in place of goose ). See also goose , sacred geese , on St Thomas the Divine kill all turkeys, geese and swine...

geese

geese v. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
18 words

... v. 1 [? SE disguise ] ( US black ) to trick, to deceive. 1995 L. Stavsky et al. A2Z...

geese

geese n. 1   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
46 words

... n. 1 [ety. unknown] ( US street gang ) a theft. 1962 (con. 1953–7 ) L. Yablonsky Violent Gang ( 1967 ) 81: He talked primarily about his P.O., the ‘geese’ (burglary) for which he was on probation. […] ‘The geese was nothin', just that market on...

geese

geese   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
78 words

... • anis , apiece, Berenice, caprice, cassis, cease, coulisse, crease, Dumfries, fils, fleece, geese, grease, Greece, kris, lease, Lucrece, MacNeice, Matisse, McAleese, Nice, niece, obese, peace, pelisse, piece, police, Rees, Rhys, set piece, sublease, surcease, two-piece, underlease • mantelpiece • headpiece • hairpiece • tailpiece • Greenpeace • chimney piece • frontispiece • timepiece • codpiece • crosspiece • mouthpiece • showpiece • earpiece • masterpiece • centrepiece ( US centerpiece) • altarpiece • workpiece • ambergris • ...

geese

geese   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Italian Dictionary: English-Italian (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
4 words
geese

geese   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
4 words
geese

geese   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
4 words
geese

geese   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
4 words
geese

geese   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Spanish Dictionary: English-Spanish (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
5 words

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