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gallery

In the 19th-century theatre building the highest and cheapest seats in the house, usually unbookable. The seating generally consisted of wooden benches, in some cases without backs. The ...

gallery

gallery   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
88 words

... , the walk built out from the admiral's or captain's cabin in larger sailing warships and extending beyond the stern. They were often highly decorated with carved work, gilded or painted, and were covered in with a wooden roof, known as a cove , and protected from the weather with elaborate glassed windows. First- and second- rate men-of-war normally had three galleries, a large stern gallery with smaller galleries on either quarter . In these ships the galleries extended over two decks, thus giving six individual galleries. See also sternwalk...

gallery

gallery   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
47 words

... . 1 Elizabethan prodigy-houses started the fashion for a long gallery on the top storey. 2 In the 17th and 18th centuries churches and chapels provided extra seats in upper galleries. In most Anglican churches these were removed in the High Church movement of the 19th...

gallery

gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Journalism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
43 words

...gallery 1. The vantage point within the UK’s Houses of Parliament from which journalists can watch and listen to the proceedings below ( see gallery reporting ). Compare lobby . 2. The control room from which the transmission of a television broadcast is...

gallery

gallery   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
62 words

... A walkway elevated over an aisle, with windows to the central vessel and exterior. Church galleries abutted masonry *vaults , provided passage to *chapels , and perhaps laywomen’s seating in *Byzantium . Diane J. Reilly A. Klukas , Altaria Superiora: The Function and Significance of the Tribune Chapel in Anglo-Norman Romanesque (1979). T. F. Mathews , The Early Churches of Constantinople: Architecture and Liturgy ...

gallery

gallery   Reference library

Anthony Quiney

The Oxford Companion to Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
105 words

... An upper balcony, passage, or compartment of much greater length than width, serving as a place of resort for exercise, dancing or conversation, or to accommodate musicians. Both secular and sacred basilicas often incorporated a gallery above their aisles , for instance in the Norman cathedrals at Laon in France and Winchester in England. Many cathedrals had a gallery built astride the junction of nave and choir or across the west end for musicians and an organ. Palaces and large mansions incorporated a gallery , eventually to show works of art,...

gallery

gallery   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
80 words

... In religious architecture a gallery is an upper storey over an aisle opening on to the nave ; it is also called a tribune . In secular architecture the term denotes a long, narrow room used for the display of pictures and sculpture, commonly found in larger Elizabethan and Jacobean houses. A gallery is also a room or building devoted to the display of works of art. In Italy a shopping arcade is called a galleria...

gallery

gallery   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
63 words

... play to the gallery act in an exaggerated or histrionic manner, especially in order to appeal to popular taste. 🅘 From the mid 17th century the highest seating in a theatre was called the gallery, and it was here that the cheapest seats—and the least refined members of the audience—were to be found. This figurative expression dates from the late 19th...

gallery

gallery   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
149 words

... 1 Elizabethan prodigy‐houses started the fashion for a long gallery on the top storey. Outstanding examples designed by Robert Smythson ( 1534 / 5 – 1614 ) can be seen at Haddon Hall and Hardwick Hall (Derbyshire). They provided space for exercise, commanded wide views, and served as a status symbol (for glass was expensive). Even the timber‐framed Little Moreton Hall (Cheshire) was provided with a gallery when John Moreton built a new range in Elizabeth I's reign. Long galleries remained fashionable into the 18th century, e.g. Wentworth Castle...

Gallery

Gallery   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Companion to the Theatre (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
180 words

... , in the 19th-century theatre building the highest and cheapest seats in the house, usually unbookable. The seating generally consisted of wooden benches, in some cases without backs. The occupants of the gallery were in about 1752 nicknamed ‘the Gods’; they often formed the most perceptive and always the most vociferous part of the audience. (Later the term was applied to the gallery itself rather than its occupants.) In the Restoration period the usual charge for the upper gallery was one shilling, but at Dorset Garden and later at Drury Lane ...

Gallery

Gallery   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,001 words

... , a long narrow room, often on an upper floor, intended for exercise and recreation. In the 16th century it was increasingly used for the display of works of art, and the term widened out to mean a space where art is displayed, and hence art gallery ( see under museum ). But this article focuses on the Renaissance idea of a gallery, within a noble residence, and intended as a display of wealth and magnificence. The gallery originated in the open colonnaded loggias of Antiquity and was first developed in France. The earliest surviving example is the...

Gallery

Gallery   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
293 words

... (ὑπερῳ̑ον κατηχούμενον, κατηχουμένιον), a corridor above the aisles and narthex of a church, opening fully onto the space of the nave through arcades or colonnades. Galleries occur in major churches throughout the empire from the 4th to 13th C. Reserved elsewhere for women or (in early centuries) for catechumens , galleries in palace chapels or churches became the preserve of the emperor or local ruler and his court, in part because they provided easy access to the church from upper levels of adjacent palaces (Hagia Sophia , Constantinople; St. Sophia,...

gallery

gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
266 words

... 1. Large internal passage, often a grand room on the upper floor of an Elizabethan or Jacobean house, called long gallery , extending the full length of a façade , and used to display pictures and tapestries, for recreation, and as a connecting corridor. Good examples exist at Hardwick and Haddon Halls, both in Derbys. 2. Large room in which pictures, etc., are hung so that they can be viewed to advantage, often with plain walls and illumination from above, hence a building containing such rooms. 3. Arcade , passage or galerie , in the French...

minstrel gallery

minstrel gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
22 words

...gallery Balcony , gallery or loft for musicians, also called a musician’s gallery , e.g. in a church or...

picture gallery

picture gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...gallery Room in a building used for displaying...

singing-gallery

singing-gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
19 words

...gallery 1. Elevated choir-loft, tribune -gallery, or cantoria for singers in a church. 2. Rood...

long gallery

long gallery   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
30 words

...gallery A very long room with high ceilings, often extending the length of an Elizabethan or Jacobean house, and used as a gallery, promenade, and multi-purpose...

quarter gallery

quarter gallery   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
107 words

...gallery , a small gallery on each quarter of a ship, with balustrades in the larger ships, which communicated with the stern gallery. Like the large gallery in the stern, they were used to provide a private walking space for the occupant of the cabin with which they communicated. Also like the stern gallery, they were, in vessels such as warships and East Indiamen , highly decorated with carvings. Galleries and quarter galleries first made an appearance in the late 14th or early 15th centuries and were still in use in the larger warships in the...

Tate Gallery

Tate Gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
90 words

...Gallery In 1890 the sugar magnate Henry Tate gave 60 modern English paintings to the National Gallery provided that a gallery was made available. Eventually the government offered the prison site at Millbank, London, and the Tate Gallery opened in 1897 . Wealthy benefactors have continued to aid expansion; in 1987 the Turner bequest was finally housed as the artist intended, in the extension funded by the Clore Foundation. The Bankside power station was converted into the Tate Modern, opened in 2000 , and the original gallery was renamed Tate...

National Gallery

National Gallery (London)   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Art and Artists (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
385 words

...the existence of Tate Britain as a separate national gallery of British art. Other well-known national galleries, with their dates of foundation, are: the National Gallery of Scotland (now Scottish National Gallery) in Edinburgh ( 1850 ); the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin (1854); the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne ( 1861 ); the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa ( 1880 ); the National Gallery of Art in Washington ( 1937 ); and the Australian National Gallery (now National Gallery of Australia) in Canberra ( 1967...

oil gallery

oil gallery   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...oil gallery A small passage cast into an engine block or cylinder head through which lubricating and cooling oil is circulated....

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