Update

You are looking at 1-20 of 2,347 entries  for:

  • All: fouling x
clear all

View:

Overview

foul

Subject: History

An adjective and a verb with various nautical meanings, generally indicative of something wrong or difficult. When used as an adjective a foul hawse is the expression used when a ship ...

fouling

fouling   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...fouling A deposition of solid material on a surface causing resistance to heat and mass transfer. The material may be process materials, precipitates, and particulates that build up on the surface of heat exchangers, packing supports, and distillation trays, etc. Pipe scale, lime, carbon, gums, and other chemical deposits can restrict the passage of flow, reducing heat transfer, and increasing pressure drops. Extreme fouling can cause blockages or plugging. Periodically, the process equipment must be taken out of service and cleaned. A fouling factor ...

fouling

fouling   Quick reference

M. V. Angel

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
321 words

... . Any surface placed in the ocean soon gains a cover of bacteria, algae and seaweeds , and animals such as barnacles , and this is known as fouling. Fouling is a serious problem for vessels large and small because it causes loss of speed and costly increases in fuel. Static structures such as pilings, the legs of offshore oil and gas platforms, and the cages of fish farms are rendered dangerously susceptible to wave damage by heavy fouling. Cleaning the hull of a modern merchant ship is an expensive and laborious task, and it is better to deter...

Fouling

Fouling   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
1,839 words

...the world. Effects of Fouling and Worm Damage Fouling can increase a vessel’s skin friction dramatically, resulting in a reduction in speed through the water that could easily reach 50 percent. Thus fouling was a serious matter for merchantmen and warships alike. In the case of merchantmen, the reduction in speed meant that an expensive capital asset might lose many weeks of gainful employment as it labored thousands of miles homeward bound, burdened by the fouling it had collected on the outward voyage and during its stay in port. Fouling routinely caused a...

fouling factor

fouling factor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...fouling factor ( fouling resistance , R ) (Unit m 2 .K/kW) An empirical factor used to account for the additional thermal resistance to heat transfer caused by deposits on, or corrosion of, a heat-transfer...

fouling community

fouling community   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... community Benthic organisms that are attached to submerged objects which have some economic importance, such as pilings or...

International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti‐fouling Systems on Ships (2001)

International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti‐fouling Systems on Ships (2001)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti‐fouling Systems on Ships (2001) An international convention that prohibits the use of harmful organotins in antifouling paints used on ships, and establishes a mechanism to prevent the potential future use of other harmful substances in antifouling...

fouling

fouling  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Any surface placed in the ocean soon gains a cover of bacteria, algae and seaweeds, and animals such as barnacles, and this is known as fouling. Fouling is a serious problem for vessels large and ...
foul

foul   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... Waste, dirty, contaminated, unpleasant, etc. A foul drain carries wastewater or foul water from, for example, a toilet to a foul sewer...

foul

foul   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
119 words

... , an adjective and a verb with various nautical meanings, generally indicative of something wrong or difficult. When used as an adjective a foul hawse is the expression used when a ship lying to two anchors gets its cables crossed; a foul wind is one which, being too much ahead , prevents a sailing ship from laying its desired course . When used as a verb it indicates much the same thing. One vessel can foul another when it drifts down on it, or can foul a ship's hawse by letting go an anchor and cable across that of the other. In a yacht race, a...

foul

foul   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
70 words

...foul [OE] The Old English word foul comes from an ancient root shared by Latin pus (adopted into Late Middle English) and Latin putere ‘to stink’ (source of LME putrid ), and the original sense was ‘stinking or disgusting’. Foul play indicating unfair conduct or treachery is recorded from the Late Middle English, and sports players have been able to complain of ‘a foul’ since the 1750s. See also fair...

foul

foul   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
141 words

... foul cry foul : see cry . fall foul of come into conflict with and be undermined by. 2004 Sunday Business Post Australia’s biggest wine-maker, Foster’s Group, is the latest company to fall foul of the wine surplus, which is...

foul

foul   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
159 words
Illustration(s):
1

... , or fouled, anchor . 1 An anchor which has become hooked in some impediment on the seabed or, on weighing , has its cable wound round the stock or the flukes . 2 The foul anchor was also the official seal of the Lord High Admiral of Britain. Its adoption as his official seal dates from the end of the 16th century when it was incorporated as part of the arms of Lord Howard of Effingham, then Lord High Admiral. A form of it, however, had been in use by the Lord High Admiral of Scotland about a century earlier. The use of the foul, or fouled,...

Foulness

Foulness (England/UK)   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Foulness , England/UK ( Fughelnesse ) An island with a name meaning ‘Promontory frequented by Birds’ from the Old English fugol ‘bird’ and næss ‘promontory’. The use of the word ‘promontory’ indicates that Foulness was at one time joined to the mainland and was not an...

foul

foul adj.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... adj. 1 (of wind or tide) opposed to one's desired course. 2 (of a rope or anchor) entangled. 3 (of a ship's bottom) overgrown with weed, barnacles, or similar matter. adv. 1 (of a ship) collide with or interfere with the passage of (another). 2 cause (a cable, anchor, or other object) to become entangled or jammed: watch out for driftwood which might foul up the engine. 3 become entangled in this...

fouling community

fouling community  

Benthic organisms that are attached to submerged objects which have some economic importance, such as pilings or boats.
foul papers

foul papers   Quick reference

An A-Z Guide to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... papers A dramatist's original, manuscript drafts, as distinct from a fair copy...

foul air

foul air   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... air ( vitiated air ) Stale air that is no longer suitable for...

foul case

foul case   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
22 words

... case The accidental appearance of a *sort in the wrong compartment of a *type case , usually the result of inaccurate *distribution...

foul drainage

foul drainage   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

... drainage A system of channels or conduits for carrying human waste matter collected from WCs, urinals, showers, sinks, baths, etc. rather than surface...

Foul Language

Foul Language   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...Foul Language . Indecent or obscene words and phrases, such as four-letter words, such sexual slurs as poofter and whore , especially when used directly to refer to or address someone, and swearwords referring to hell and damnation, but not usually ethnic slurs or simple abuse. Dickhead is foul language, but blockhead and nigger are not. Someone foul-mouthed regularly uses foul language. See swearing ; usage . ...

View: