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footring

Subject: Archaeology

[De]

A low pedestal‐like ring formed on the base of a vessel to enable it to stand more securely.

footring

footring   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
20 words

... [De] A low pedestal‐like ring formed on the base of a vessel to enable it to stand more...

footring

footring  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[De]A low pedestal‐like ring formed on the base of a vessel to enable it to stand more securely.
Bullet teapot

Bullet teapot  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Spherical teapot mounted on a footring. The earliest silver teapots were pear-shaped, but c.1730 this design was superseded by the bullet teapot, which was in turn superseded by the drum-shaped ...
krater

krater  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]A large Greek pottery vessel for mixing wine. Usually with a low footring base and a pair of handles, but shapes otherwise vary, the volute krater, for example, having handles mounted on the ...
flagon

flagon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ar]A vessel with a narrow neck, globular body, one or more handles and often a footring, used for holding liquids. Its production was usually confined to specialist manufacturers.
flagon

flagon   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
30 words

...[Ar] A vessel with a narrow neck, globular body, one or more handles and often a footring, used for holding liquids. Its production was usually confined to specialist...

Bullet teapot

Bullet teapot   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
36 words

...teapot . Spherical teapot mounted on a footring. The earliest silver teapots were pear-shaped, but c. 1730 this design was superseded by the bullet teapot, which was in turn superseded by the drum-shaped teapot of the...

krater

krater   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
44 words

...[Ar] A large Greek pottery vessel for mixing wine. Usually with a low footring base and a pair of handles, but shapes otherwise vary, the volute krater, for example, having handles mounted on the shoulder and projecting above the height of the...

Qingbai ware

Qingbai ware   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
159 words

...a proportion of kaolin was added to the body, making it stronger and more plastic. The shapes of these wares were influenced by the Ding wares of Hebei Province . In common with those, Qingbai bowls were fired upside-down: evidence of this may be seen in the fact that the foot-rings are glazed, while the mouths of the bowls are...

Kōetsu, Hon’ami

Kōetsu, Hon’ami (1558)   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
235 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Sakai priv. Col); fully rounded, as in the Otogoze bowl (ex-Morikawa priv. col., Nagoya ); or with a rounded bottom and a cylindrical upper half, as in the Amagumo bowl (Tokyo, Mitsui priv. col). Kōetsu's best work features decisive and vigorous carving, especially in the foot-ring and rim. His interest in form stands in contrast to his neglect of the finish: the glazes scale off and are discoloured, and many pieces are cracked. Kōetsu's bowls, like others in the Raku-ware tradition, are coated with a black or transparent glaze; the latter take on the red...

Derrynaflan Treasure

Derrynaflan Treasure   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
928 words
Illustration(s):
1

...a complex gilt copper-alloy stem cast in three parts, and a large sub-conical foot with a broad, flat foot-ring. A band of filigree panels and amber settings girdles the bowl, which, where it passes through the handles, bears two cast copper-alloy ornaments in the so-called kerbschnitt technique. Filigree panels and amber studs decorate the handles, escutcheons, stem, and foot. Cast panels of interlace and animal ornament occur on the stem and foot-ring. The upper and lower rings of the stem are riveted to the bowl and foot respectively, which are united,...

Jizhou

Jizhou   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
372 words

...and celadons in the Tang, the kilns’ range of activity was developed during the Song ( 960–1279 ), especially the Southern Song ( 1127–1279 ). They produced tablewares of a rather soft, off-white clay under brown and black glazes, mostly teabowls of conical form with minimal foot-rings. The potters invented a wide variety of decorative techniques mainly for the inside of bowls. These included mottling with phosphatic slip; preserving patterns in brown, probably by using papercuts against a coating of uneven buff slip; painting with slip; and even dipping a...

Ardagh Treasure

Ardagh Treasure   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
802 words
Illustration(s):
1

...parts, and a large, sub-conical foot with a broad, flat foot-ring. A band of filigree ornaments and gem-set enamel studs girdles the bowl below the ring. Below this are two applied medallions with filigree and enamels. The strap handles spring from applied escutcheons decorated with enamel, filigree, and granulation. The stem carries superb cast gilt kerbschnitt (chip-carved) ornaments; curvilinear, Ultimate La Tène designs and animal patterns are noteworthy. The upper- and underside of the foot-ring are heavily decorated. The bowl, foot, and stem are united...

Early Christian metalwork

Early Christian metalwork   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...fixtures weighing a total of 4000 lbs. Other silver objects include liturgical vessels (e.g. patens, chalices and other wine vessels, spoons, strainers, washing sets) as well as fans, censers, crosses, and book covers. The paten is a plate with a flat base (sometimes with a foot-ring) and high flaring sides, usually with a large incised cross in its centre surrounded by a dedicatory inscription, but sometimes decorated with a eucharistic scene in relief. The patens in the Sion Treasure are exceptionally large, measuring up to 77 mm across; the heaviest paten...

Rock crystal

Rock crystal   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
2,389 words
Illustration(s):
2

...Fermo Cathedral; Venice, S. Marco; London, V&A; for illustration see Fatimid ). Made of flawless crystal, they have pear-shaped bodies, thin walls, mouths with prominent lips, necks with two or three sharp moldings, another molding (except on the London piece) below a flared footring, and a handle cut from the same piece of crystal as the body, pierced and surmounted by an animal. The bodies have a central stylized foliate motif, flanked by animals decorated with intaglio discs. The animals vary: paired birds (Paris, Florence and Fermo), confronted seated...

Ceramics

Ceramics   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
33,832 words
Illustration(s):
22

...been imported from Mesopotamia, the others made locally. Some shapes demonstrate clear affinities with Chinese forms. Curvilinear bowls with everted rims and foot-rings, a typical form found at Samarra and Susa, were probably based on Chinese stoneware bowls that had arrived in Mesopotamia in the 9th century. Potters also copied the Yuëh-type ribbed bowl with a lobed rim and a slightly splayed foot-ring. While generally left plain like their models, these forms were sometimes decorated with cobalt-blue designs (see color pl. 1:XVI, fig. 2) or splashed with...

Snuff-boxes and snuff bottles

Snuff-boxes and snuff bottles   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
5,651 words
Illustration(s):
3

...and Snuff-boxes, 17th–20th centuries (St Petersburg, 1997) N. Du Tertre : The Art of the Limoges Box (New York, 2003) 2. C hina . The Chinese snuff bottle is typically small, appropriate for holding in the hand, and of ellipsoid shape; it normally stands on a cylindrical foot-ring and has a cylindrical mouth. Its hemispherical cap, often of hardstone, is fitted with a spatula, generally of ivory, set in a stopper that may be of tightly rolled paper attached by a washer. There are also circular, oval, square, double-gourd and heart-shaped snuff bottles and...

Metalwork

Metalwork   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
30,062 words
Illustration(s):
22

...while that in Cleveland, with a poem dedicated to Samsam al-Dawla in 983–5 , has the more traditional rounded body and flaring neck. Shallow bowls, or cups, were similarly made with and without handles. Some were simple hemispherical vessels; others, with more vertical sides, foot-rings and handles with finger holes and thumb-rests, are distinguished by decoration on the exterior, which ranges from chased inhabited vine-scrolls (e.g. priv. col., see Baer, 1983 , fig. 78) to epigraphic and animal friezes (Jerusalem, Mayer Mus. Islam. A., M 40–68). 4....

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