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five members

Subject: History

1642. On 4 January 1642 Charles I, exasperated at the opposition of the House of Commons, attempted in person to arrest five of its leaders—John Pym, John Hampden, Denzil Holles, ...

five members

five members   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History
Length:
134 words

... members The five members of the English parliament that Charles I attempted to arrest on 4 January 1642 . Mounting opposition to the king, culminating in the Grand Remonstrance ( December 1641 ), had been led by Pym , supported by Hampden , Holles, Hesilrige, and Strode. Charles rashly decided to arrest and impeach them. He entered the House of Commons only to find that the members had fled into the City of London; they returned to the House of Commons a week later. This attempted use of force by the king hardened Parliamentary opposition against...

five members

five members (1642)   Reference library

J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
79 words

... members , 1642 . On 4 January 1642 Charles I, exasperated at the opposition of the House of Commons, which had passed the Grand Remonstrance , attempted in person to arrest five of its leaders— John Pym , John Hampden , Denzil Holles , Arthur Haselrig , and William Strode . Forewarned, they made their escape, leaving the king to mutter, ‘I see that my birds have flown.’ Within a week he had left London, never to return as a free man. J. A....

five members

five members   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
73 words

... members , 1642 . On 4 January 1642 Charles I , exasperated at the opposition of the House of Commons, attempted in person to arrest five of its leaders— John Pym , John Hampden , Denzil Holles , Arthur Haselrig , and William Strode . Forewarned, they made their escape, leaving the king to mutter, ‘I see that my birds have flown.’ Within a week he had left London, never to return as a free...

five members

five members  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1642.On 4 January 1642 Charles I, exasperated at the opposition of the House of Commons, attempted in person to arrest five of its leaders—John Pym, John Hampden, Denzil Holles, Arthur Haselrig, and ...
Euphemisms

Euphemisms   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
975 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...N.W. 825, 827 (Neb. 1924 ). Perhaps the judge didn't mean to be so literal as to think of the hymen, but the phrasing certainly suggests it. Again, some subjects cry out for euphemisms or circumlocutions. Explicitness or directness would be undesirable to almost everyone here: “Five balloons containing marijuana were properly admitted [into evidence] since they derived from a source independent from an allegedly unconstitutional digital rectal search of the inmate, namely, from the tip of a reliable informant.” United States v. Caldwell , 750 F.2d 341...

Welsh Local and Family History

Welsh Local and Family History   Quick reference

D. Huw Owen

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,425 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...), T. J. Morgan and Prys Morgan , Welsh Surnames ( 1985 ), David W. Howell , The Rural Poor in Eighteenth‐Century Wales ( 2000 ), Roger Turvey , Pembrokeshire: The Concise History ( 2007 ), and other volumes in The Histories of Wales series, together with the five Welsh‐language, five English‐language, and one bilingual volumes in the series The Social History of the Welsh Language , ed. Geraint H. Jenkins ( 1997–2000 ), which contain detailed studies of the social context of the Welsh language in various communities. The University's Board of...

Phrasal Adjectives

Phrasal Adjectives   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
2,154 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...downward-sloping line early-nineteenth-century settlers easy-credit charge account electrical-equipment conspirators English-speaking people evil-minded aggressor exclusive-dealing contracts face-to-face meetings far-ranging and free-thinking eclecticism first-run motion pictures five-judge tribunal flesh-and-blood individuals foreign-sounding name for-profit firms French-lace smuggler full-blown cartel garden-variety exclusive-dealing case government-owned business hard-and-fast, cut-and-dried, open-and-shut issue hard-core sexual conduct hard-eyed view...

Britain and America: A Common Heritage

Britain and America: A Common Heritage   Quick reference

George Redmonds

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,879 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Great Migration Study Project. This covers the earliest years of settlement in New England, presenting some English origins for the first time, and its findings are published in a newsletter and a unique set of reference books. The series will consist of seven volumes, of which five are already available. The author is also one of the three editors of The American Genealogist ( TAG ), an independent quarterly journal founded in 1922 by Donald Lines Jacobus . This too is dedicated to genealogical scholarship. Another well‐known quarterly is the New York...

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

..., Princeton, NJ, 1987; Klancher, J. , The Making of English Reading Audiences, 1790–1832 , Madison, Wis., 1987; Korshin, P. , ‘ Types of Eighteenth-Century Literary Patronage ’, Eighteenth-Century Studies , 7 (1974), 453–69; Lackington, J. , Memoirs of the First Forty-Five Years of the Life of James Lackington: the Present Bookseller in Chiswell Street, Moorfields, London, written by himself in a series of letters to a friend , London, 1791; Neuburg, V. , Chap-books: A Guide to Reference Material , London, 1972; Raven, J. , Small, H. , & ...

Labour History

Labour History   Quick reference

John L. Halstead

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,401 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...then controversial among historians, is now well attested. One example of a fine study is Iain McCalman , Radical Underworld: Prophets, Revolutionaries, and Pornographers in London, 1795–1840 ( 1993 ). Second, one cannot deny the sheer wealth of activity, or its temper. Five examples call for mention: on Welsh insurrectionism, see Gwyn A. Williams , The Merthyr Rising (1988); on illegal newspaper publishing, Patricia Hollis, The Pauper Press: A Study in Working‐Class Radicalism of the 1830's ( 1970 ); and on ‘English socialism’, J. F. C....

Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

Margaret Gelling

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,757 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Old English place‐name element tu¯n ‘farm, estate’. Shropshire has ten Astons, eight Westons, seven Nortons, and eight Suttons, and there are five Uptons, four Middletons, and ten Newtons. Acton (‘oak estate’) occurs eight times, Eaton (‘river estate’) six, and Eyton (‘island settlement’) five. There are four instances of Hatton, Mor(e)ton, and Wootton (referring to heath, marsh, and wood). There are five Prestons (estates from which the revenues were devoted to the upkeep of a group of priests). Such names could have originated in the speech of Mercian...

Punctuation

Punctuation   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
7,703 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and the first word; and (7) resist the temptation to play with hollow characters, smiley faces, check marks, and the like—unless you’re trying for an offbeat appearance, use real bullet dots. C. Colon [:]. This mark, which promises the completion of something just begun, has five uses. First, it may link two separate clauses or phrases by indicating a step forward from the first to the second: the step may be from an introduction to a main theme, from a cause to an effect, from a general statement to a particular instance, or from a premise to a...

Mythology

Mythology   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,714 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...) claim for the superiority of the Hindu to the Mosaic chronology in his History of Ancient Astronomy , fellow sceptic Louis Langlès ( 1763–1824 ), keeper of oriental manuscripts at the Bibliothèque Nationale, maintained that the Pentateuch and the five Chinese books of kings were derivations of the five Vedas. A host of other sceptics, including Volney and Dupuis, accordingly sought to recast the Christian story as an *astrological myth of Indian or Egyptian provenance. Jones energetically combated the sceptics by dismissing the Hindu chronology as a...

Architecture

Architecture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,949 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...open to anyone who had studied in an office for at least five years. However, the break-through date was 1834 when architects reclaimed part of the public discourse with J. C. *Loudon 's Architectural Magazine , written largely by and for professionals. At the same time, no fewer than eighty leading practitioners from around the country banded together to found the Institute of British Architects. Dedicated to upholding the reputation of the profession, the Institute held its present and future members to an unprecedented code of ethics. This dictated the...

The Twentieth Century

The Twentieth Century   Quick reference

Brian M. Short

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,083 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...imperial taxation, and should not be confused with local rating measures and rate valuation lists, which were a regular feature of local authority income. One study, for example, has traced changes of tenure and ownership by combining the 1910 material together with successive five‐year interval‐rating valuations for Bethnal Green through to the Second World War, and undoubtedly much more information awaits analysis in this way for most parts of England and Wales. In 1992 the records of the National Farm Survey of England and Wales ( 1941–3 ) became...

12 The Economics of Print

12 The Economics of Print   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
7,040 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...gained powers to regulate *apprentices and apprenticeships and to seize illegal books ( see censorship ), and it prohibited printing by non-members. This largely confined printing to London, centralizing the trade until the end of the 17 th century ( see 20a ). The Company’s custom of recording permission to print a book—a practice inaugurated in part to forestall adverse competition between its members—became regularized, and in 1559 the *Stationers’ Register became the authoritative record within the trade of who had the right to print copies...

2 The Sacred Book

2 The Sacred Book   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
9,978 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and Kituvim (hagiographa). The initial, most important, and authoritative division is the Torah (Law, also meaning ‘instruction’, ‘teaching’), which includes the so-called Five Books of Moses or the Pentateuch: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Scholars refer to the Pentateuch as the Hexateuch, which is derived from the Greek term meaning ‘five scrolls’ (five books plus Joshua). The Torah represented God’s gift to the people of Israel. This gift was, however, conditional upon the people’s acceptance of the divine commandments and their...

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800

20a The History of the Book in Britain, c.1475–1800   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,011 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the premises of all printers and other members of the trade and to seize any seditious or heretical material. The Company regulated publishing and enforced an early system of *copyright (though the word itself is an 18 th -century coinage) by requiring that new titles be registered in advance of being printed. By the close of the 16 th century, the Stationers’ Company was beginning to lay the groundwork for consolidating the *rights in certain standard works into a portfolio controlled by its most senior members. A royal grant by James I in 1603 ...

The Two Noble Kinsmen

The Two Noble Kinsmen   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,335 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...been eaten by wolves: full of self-reproach, she is beginning to lose her wits. 3.3 Arcite brings Palamon food: as he eats, the rivals reminisce about each other’s past loves. 3.4 The Jailer’s Daughter, mad, imagines a shipwreck. 3.5 Gerald the schoolmaster is rehearsing five countrymen, five countrywomen, and a taborer in the morris dance they are to perform before Theseus when they realize they are a woman short: however, they recruit the mad Jailer’s Daughter, and when Theseus and his party arrive they perform their elaborate dance, prefaced by Gerald’s...

6 The European Printing Revolution

6 The European Printing Revolution   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
6,082 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in this spread of literacy were part of an expanded middle class, lay professionals who were neither members of the aristocracy nor artisans or peasants. This class included civil servants employed at the numerous lay and religious courts of Europe, such as ambassadors, judges, bailiffs, and their secretaries; professionals such as lawyers, notaries, physicians, and university professors; and even schoolteachers, merchants, and traders. Many clergymen and members of monasteries and convents were traditionally also purchasers of books. Reformed congregations—e.g....

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