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Overview

exegesis

Critical interpretation or explanation of a text, traditionally associated with religious scriptures, but now used with reference to close readings and analyses of any text.

exegesis

exegesis   Quick reference

A Dictionary of the Bible (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion
Length:
106 words

... A Greek word (found in the * LXX but not in NT) meaning ‘explanation’. It refers nowadays to commentary on the biblical text to elucidate obscurities and to relate one word or verse or section to others in order to define exact meanings. Modern exegesis therefore makes use of textual criticism and linguistic expertise as well as historical and literary disciplines and can also make use of archaeological discoveries. Mistakes in any of these areas could result in false exegesis, as was the case with exegesis of Jesus' * parables about the * kingdom...

exegesis

exegesis   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
37 words

... ( adj. exegetic or exegetical ) [/ˌɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs/] Critical interpretation or explanation of a text , traditionally associated with religious scriptures, but now used with reference to close readings and analyses of any text . ...

exegesis

exegesis   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... [ eks-ĕ- jee -sis ] ( plural -geses ) The interpretation or explanation of a text . The term was first applied to the interpretation of religious scriptures (or oracles and visions), but has been borrowed by literary criticism for the analysis of any poetry or prose. Literary scholars have likewise inherited some of the procedures of biblical exegesis, for instance the decoding of allegories ( see typology ). A person who practises exegesis is an exegete . Adjective : exegetic or exegetical...

Exegesis

Exegesis   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
146 words

... (Gk., ‘bring out’). 1 The task of ‘bringing out’ the meaning of a text. Exegesis raises immediately the central question of hermeneutics , whose meaning is the meaning of the meaning? The task of exegesis is to seek out legitimate meaning in the light of continuing and developing understanding. However, if the text does not exercise some control over proposed meanings, interpretation easily becomes eisegesis (reading meaning into a text). 2 A seminar-based organization devoted to ‘the business of transformation’. Running from 1976 until 1984 ,...

Exegesis

Exegesis   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
263 words

... (ἐξήγησις, lit. “leading out”), hermeneutics, explanation or interpretation of the Bible . The foundations of exegesis were laid by the Alexandrian School , esp. Origen , who suggested that the sacred text had several layers of meaning. He recommended threefold exegesis on the model of a tripartite human nature, consisting of body, soul, and spirit. This approach supposes literal, allegorical, and spiritual senses of the text, or—to put it differently—references to the past, present, and future. Against this, the Antiochene School emphasized the...

exegesis

exegesis   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
247 words

... . The act of explaining a text, in theology usually a sacred text. The purpose may be either to describe the author’s meaning or to apply that meaning to a contemporary situation. Biblical exegesis has been practised from early times by both Jews and Christians. In conflict with Gnostic exegetes, Christian writers insisted that the meaning must be elucidated in conformity with apostolic tradition. A chiefly allegorical mode of interpretation was fostered by the Alexandrian school , while that of Antioch cultivated the explanation of the literal...

Exegesis

Exegesis   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
1,358 words

...states. Exegesis by Shīʿī scholars has typically favored the allegorical over the literal, reflecting the influence of Sufism on mainstream Shīʿī thinking. Prominent Shīʿī exegetes include ʿAlī ibn Ibrāhīm al-Qummī (also known as Ibn Bābūyah [Bābawayh]; d. 939 ) from the early centuries of Islam and Muḥammad Ḥusayn Ṭabāṭabāʿī ( 1903–1981 ), whose twenty-volume Al-mīzān fī tafsīr al-Qurʿān (Balance in Interpreting the Qurʿān)] represents the apogee of twentieth-century Shīʿī exegesis. Throughout Muslim history, works of philosophical exegesis, tafsīr...

exegesis

exegesis   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,614 words

...interpretation (eisegesis) 3. Renewed interest in exegesis 4. Medieval Jewish and Muslim exegesis 1. Definition and history Exegesis can mean explanation, but it literally means ‘to bring the meaning out of’ a given text, and includes the goal of approaching the text objectively. Exegesis contrasts with eisegesis (Greek, ‘to lead in’), ‘bringing the meaning into’ the interpretive conclusions about a given text, by importing subjective, pre-formulated, general beliefs to explain a text. Exegesis is the interpretation and understanding of a text on...

exegesis

exegesis   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,075 words

...sought to combine the two kinds of exegesis, though the former emphasized the literal, the latter the allegorical, sense. Among the later Greek Fathers the science of exegesis was represented esp. by Hesychius of Jerusalem , St John of Damascus , and Euthymius Zigabenus . In the W. many of the Schoolmen were concerned with the methods of exegesis, notably Peter Lombard , Alexander of Hales , and St Thomas Aquinas . They favoured the fourfold method of literal, allegorical, moral, and anagogical (or mystical) exegesis; their chief contribution was an...

Exegesis

Exegesis   Reference library

Christophe Nihan

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
5,880 words

...in the case of religious scriptures. Within biblical studies and related fields, “exegesis” can therefore be used to refer to virtually any form of commentary, ancient or modern, of the Jewish and Christian canons, such as midrashic exegesis or patristic exegesis. However, there also exists a more specialized use of this term, according to which “exegesis” refers to the academic study of the Bible that has developed in modern times. In this restricted understanding, exegesis designates a form of commentary that seeks to explain and interpret the contents of a...

exegesis

exegesis   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art and Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
263 words

... is a Greek word meaning guiding and, interpreting, and normally refers to biblical exegesis, the interpretation and elucidation of a difficult, complex, or obscure text. It is directly opposed to eisegesis , which is to read a meaning into a text instead of trying to discover the true meaning of the text itself. Though few—if any—art historians would claim to be exegetes, yet the practice of art history often requires the methods used by an exegete: an examination of the work of art in a literal sense, to define its materials, form, and condition, its...

exegesis

exegesis   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... ; epexegesis ; eisegesis . Exegesis ( /eks-ә- jee -sis/ ), the usual term, means “explanation or exposition (as of a word or sentence).” The other two are rare. Epexegesis = the addition of a word or words to convey more clearly the meaning implied, or the specific sense intended, in a preceding word or sentence ( OED ). Eisegesis ( /ɪ-sә- jee -sis/ ) = the interpretation of a word or passage by reading into it one's own ideas ( OED ). But surely reading into —or some like phrase—is clearer. Each of these terms forms the plural by changing the...

exegesis

exegesis   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
81 words

...exegesis (Greek exêgeisthai , to explain, interpret, from ex - out + hêgeisthai , to guide or lead) A critical (in the sense of closely reasoned) explanatory examination of a written text using interpretation principles that focus on the text itself (what the text says on its face). The word formerly had biblical connotations but by extension is applied to any serious and respected scholarly work, such as that produced by a jurist. Pronounced with equal emphasis on each syllable, ex-eh-jee-sus . See also hermeneutics ....

Exegesis

Exegesis   Reference library

J. Nohrnberg

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
3,379 words

...also built into this is the assumption that exegesis is directed to passages that are not obviously self-explanatory and need supplementary exposition or unfolding to be comprehended properly. Historically speaking, exegesis is almost inevitably associated with the expounding of the Bible, in part because of the long-term devel. of exegesis in the West, from Hellenistic times, and incl. rabbinic commentaries as found in collections of Midrash and the Talmud. Observance of the Jewish law required halakic exegesis or guidance as to how the law was to be...

biblical exegesis

biblical exegesis   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
183 words

...of Irish exegesis is the extent to which it is anonymous: we possess few names, and it is modern research that attributes works to Irish scholars. This raises the question of an Irish school of exegesis, and the search for tell‐tale Irish symptoms in such works. While there are prominent features of Irish works (e.g. interest in grammar and computistics in the midst of exegesis), these cannot settle the question as they are not exclusively Irish. O'Loughlin, T. (ed.), The Scriptures and Early Medieval Ireland (1999) Thomas...

BIBLE EXEGESIS

BIBLE EXEGESIS   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Religion
Length:
2,277 words

...also the outcome of a unique form of biblical exegesis. The development of mystical trends in Judaism was also supported by a form of biblical exegesis, in which esoteric doctrines were sought in the supposed hidden meanings of certain biblical texts ( see Kabbalah ). In particular the biblical account of Creation ( Gn . 1; See Maʿaseh Be-Reʿshit ) and the first chapter of Ezekiel ( see Maʿaseh Merkavah ) provided the basis for mystical exegesis. Of special importance in the history of biblical exegesis was Philo , whose allegorical method of...

Rabbinic Exegesis

Rabbinic Exegesis   Reference library

Jason Kalman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
8,151 words

...exegesis, particularly in matters of halakhah (Jewish law). Daniel Frank has argued, “It was unquestionably the Karaites who moved biblical exegesis to center stage. Abandoning Rabbinic midrash while championing philology, they perfected a new form. The Bible commentary was born in the Islamic East” ( 2004 , p. 257). The earliest Jewish Bible commentary to survive from the Middle Ages is Daniel al-Qumisi the Karaite’s (ninth c., Iran, later Palestine) commentary on the Minor Prophets, although fragments of earlier commentaries are extant. Karaite exegesis...

exegesis, Jewish biblical

exegesis, Jewish biblical   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
959 words

...exegesis that presented philological, rationalistic, philosophical, homiletic, and even Kabbalistic elements in varied selections. It is possible to distinguish among rationalistic exegesis ( Abraham *ibn Ezra , David *Kimhi ), Kabbalistic exegesis ( *Moses ben Nahman ), and philosophical exegesis ( *Levi ben Gerson ), although all commentators included elements from more than one field in their commentaries and philological exegesis continued to be an important part of biblical exegesis. Later Sephardic exegetes often used philosophical exegesis...

exegesis, Jewish liturgical

exegesis, Jewish liturgical   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
483 words

..., Jewish liturgical Medieval exegesis of Jewish liturgical texts was a fruitful genre mainly in *Ashkenaz , where from the 11th century onwards commentaries on prayers and piyyutim were composed. Although medieval scholars quoted prayers and piyyutim as proof-texts in their other writings, exegesis of liturgy was mainly confined to the commentaries on the Siddur and *Mahzor . The first piyyut commentaries were taught orally at the rabbinic academies in the Rhineland; written commentaries were first transmitted in the milieu of *Rashi in Troyes....

Cross-Cultural Exegesis

Cross-Cultural Exegesis   Reference library

Daniel Smith-Christopher

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
7,948 words

... Cross-Cultural Exegesis Cross-cultural exegesis refers to biblical analysis that intentionally draws from the cultural background and experiences of the scholar him/herself in order to suggest analogies to historical phenomena in biblical history, propose alternative views on the context of a biblical passage, or otherwise nuance an interpretation of a text and/or artifact. The Contours of “Cross-Cultural Exegesis.” There is some debate about differentiating between cultural perspectives that may be considered relevant for historical or...

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