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Overview

executor's oath

Subject: Law

A written statement sworn by executors or administrators of an estate; it accompanies an application for a grant of representation (Non Contentious Probate Rules 1987, 8). See also oath. ...

executor’s oath

executor’s oath   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
48 words

...’s oath Formerly, a written statement sworn by executors or administrators of an estate to accompany an application for a grant of representation . The requirement has been replaced by that of a statement of truth (Non-Contentious Probate Rules 1987 , r 8, as amended). See also oath...

executor's oath

executor's oath  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A written statement sworn by executors or administrators of an estate; it accompanies an application for a grant of representation (Non Contentious Probate Rules 1987, 8). See also oath.
Jeremiah

Jeremiah   Reference library

Kathleen M. O'Connor and Kathleen M. O'Connor

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
48,981 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...underscore the public, legal nature of the event. As executor, Baruch places the deeds in a jar to preserve them ( vv. 12–14 ). The last verse explains the meaning of the purchase. Life will resume in the land ( v. 15 ), for YHWH will redeem it just as Jeremiah redeems the land of his kin. The story of Jeremiah's land redemption affirms to the implied audience that life in the land will resume in a new future. Although the promise originated with Jeremiah, Baruch witnessed it, served as executor, and thus emerges as a reliable interpreter and developer of...

probate

probate   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
163 words

... n. A document issued by the Family Division of the High Court, or a district registry, on the application of executors appointed by a will, to the effect that the will is valid and that the executors are authorized to administer the deceased’s estate. When there is no apparent doubt about the will’s validity, probate is granted in common form on the executors filing an executor’s oath . Probate granted in common form can be revoked by the court at any time on the application of an interested party who proves that the will is invalid. When the will...

Payne, William

Payne, William (1650–96)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
416 words

...of Magdalene ( 1671–5 ) until he married. From 1673 to 1681 he was in charge of the parishes of Frinstead and Wormshill in Kent. His early interest in experimental philosophy led to his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1681 . But, according to his friend and executor, Joseph Powell , he gave up such studies and ‘wholly applied himself’ to his duties as a pastor when, also in 1681 , he moved to London to become rector of Whitechapel. He established a reputation as a preacher and in 1689 he proceeded DD. In the same year he was appointed...

inventories, probate

inventories, probate   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
363 words

...districts until much later) it was the custom of the ecclesiastical courts that proved wills in England and Wales to insist that the executors should appoint three or four local men to make ‘a true and perfect inventory’ of the personal estate of the deceased. The inventory was filed with the will, or where a person died intestate with the letters of administration . The appraisers, or valuers, swore a solemn oath that they would carry out their duty truthfully. They proceeded to list every item of furniture and utensils in the house, then they noted...

assumpsit

assumpsit   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
891 words

...against executors where debt on a contract was unavailable. Plaintiffs also began to use assumpsit even where an action of debt could be brought. Assumpsit had two main advantages. It allowed recovery of consequential damages: recovery was not limited to the fixed sum of money owed, which was all that was available in debt. Damages might be a larger amount than the sum owed. Also, jury trial was available. Jury trial was more attractive to plaintiffs than wager of law, which was used in debt. Wager of law, which allowed the defendant to bring oath helpers...

Testament

Testament   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
927 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the following elements: a preamble ( Names and titles of the testator, circumstances, dates), pious clauses (invocation, choice of burial-place , funeral and commemorative ceremonies, pious and charitable gifts), secular clauses (various Legacies , designation of heir and executors), then the Names of the witnesses and the formulae of validation. But Christian Europe between the 12th and the 15th c. knew quite a wide variety of testamentary acts. The customs on which the Roman testament had been superimposed, the time when it was introduced, the...

Bohrās

Bohrās   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences, Regional and Area Studies
Length:
1,469 words

...directly to the central administration of the dāʿī based in Bombay, called al-Daʿwah al-Hādiyah. At the age of puberty, every Bohrā, or muʿmin (believer) as sectarians call each other, pronounces the traditional oath of allegiance, which requires the initi-ate to adhere to the sharīʿah and accept the leadership of the imam and the dāʿī. This oath is renewed each year on the eighteenth of Dhu al-Ḥijjah (ʿId Gadīr al-Khumm). The Bohrās follow the Fāṭimid school of jurisprudence, which recognizes seven pillars of Islam. Walāyah (love and devotion) for Allāh,...

inventories, probate

inventories, probate   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
1,305 words

...it was the custom of the ecclesiastical courts that proved wills in England and Wales to insist that the executors should appoint three or four local men to make ‘a true and perfect inventory’ of the personal estate of the deceased, so that any dispute over the will could be more easily settled. The inventory was filed with the will, or where a person died intestate with the letters of administration . The appraisers, or valuers, swore a solemn oath that they would carry out their duty truthfully. They proceeded to list every item of furniture and utensils...

Blessings and Curses

Blessings and Curses   Reference library

Denise Dombkowski Hopkins

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Theology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion
Length:
2,512 words

...to both “oath” ( šĕbûʿâ ) and “covenant” ( bĕrît ). Cursing was not automatic and could be called off by conventional means ( Judg 17:2; 21:18–23 ; 1 Sam 14:45 ). Earlier research connected curse in ancient Near Eastern suzerainty or vassal treaties with the covenant form in the Hebrew Bible. Subsequent scholarship argued that there was no fixed treaty form in the Levant from which Israel would have borrowed. The motivating themes of gratitude and fear in treaties depended upon what kind of sociopolitical order was in place. Curses were used in oaths as a...

Equity

Equity   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
6,508 words
Illustration(s):
1

...(i.e., beneficial interests in land) against feoffees’ heirs and purchasers with notice. Implied uses were recognized, on bargains and sales of land and feoffments without consideration. Feoffees to the uses of a last will could be seen functionally as executors, and suits against and between such executors appeared in this period. The enforcement of uses has been seen as enforcement of third-party beneficiary contracts, and (a recurring theme) it has been said that most questions in the late-medieval Chancery turned upon some contract or promise. But...

Warburton, William

Warburton, William (1698–1779)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
2,866 words

...when he became a preacher at Lincoln's Inn. In 1757 he became Dean of Bristol, and in 1760 , Bishop of Gloucester. He can be considered to have been the leading religious polemicist in mid-eighteenth-century England, and was something of a literary dictator, not least as the executor of Alexander Pope and the editor of Shakespeare. Apart from a few translations designed to give himself literary practice and to acquire patrons, Warburton's first publication of any note was an anonymously published anti-Catholic and anti-deist tract entitled A Critical and...

Coward, Noël

Coward, Noël   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,717 words

...with the astringent Waiting in the Wings , set among elderly actresses in a retirement home. Coward's own life became notably more settled, in the partnership he formed with Graham Payn who now, and for the rest of Coward's life, became his close companion and eventually his executor, but, increasingly alienated from postwar English life and theater, he moved to Jamaica in the late 1940s and, although returning to England on occasion, based himself either there or in his house near Lake Geneva. But Coward lived to witness his rediscovery that he famously...

politics, the military in

politics, the military in   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...of its policies. At best Seeckt rendered the army politically naïve. At worst, it was bound to be attracted by a government that promised to revoke the humiliation of the Versailles Treaty and to undertake Germany's rearmament. In WW II the Wehrmacht became the willing executor of Hitler's strategy. In careerist terms, the war gave the army's generals the victories that had eluded their predecessors 30 years previously. More significantly, in ideological terms, the army identified wholeheartedly with the war against Bolshevism on the eastern front, and...

Bodin,                 Jean

Bodin, Jean (1529/30–1596)   Reference library

Maryanne Cline Horowitz

The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,592 words

... referred to Aug. to explain the role of evil demons and recalled Aug.'s rejection of the Manichaeans and his Stoicizing conclusion that evil is only the absence of good ( civ . 11.9). B. argues that God permits evil spirits as executors of justice for a greater good ( Démonomanie 1.1., p. citing civ . 11.17 on God making a good use even of evil). An important precedent and source of B.'s calling of Aug.'s authority is Malleus maleficarum pt 1, questions 12 and 13 on the ...

Jacobs, Kenneth Sydney

Jacobs, Kenneth Sydney (born 5 October 1917)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the High Court of Australia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Law
Length:
2,883 words
Illustration(s):
1

... A-G (Qld); Ex rel Nye v Cathedral Church of Brisbane ( 1977 ) or land law (see Commonwealth v Oldfield ( 1976 ); Housing Commission v San Sebastian ( 1978 ), Jacobs often gave the leading judgment. In other cases such as Pigram v A-G (NSW) ( 1975 ), Equity Trustees Executors & Agency Co v Commissioner of Probate Duties (Vic) ( 1976 ) or Quadramain v Sevastapol Investments ( 1976 ), his view of equitable principles or commercial realities led him into dissent, and sometimes into sole dissent. Repeatedly in such cases, he appealed to ‘a fair and...

Emancipation of Slaves

Emancipation of Slaves   Reference library

Paul Finkelman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...to be[,] and she must reckon it one of the infelicities of her position that in so far at least she was taken at her word.” Butler then offered to return the slaves to Colonel Mallory if he would come to Fort Monroe and “take the oath of allegiance to the Constitution of the United States .” Until Mallory took such an oath, however, his slaves were contrabands of war and could not be returned. By the end of the summer the army had adopted Butler’s notion of contrabands, and army commanders were authorized to give sanctuary to any Confederate-owned slaves...

Irish Law

Irish Law   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
7,116 words
Illustration(s):
1

...amending Act of 1709 , intimated that in the new century different considerations would obtain. The pattern had been set by English legislation of 1691 extending to Ireland. Members of both houses of parliament were obliged to take an oath of allegiance, a declaration against a belief in transubstantiation, and an oath abjuring the power of the pope. Worse, from the Catholic point of view, was to follow. Legislation disarmed “papists”—the official designation for a century and more of the Crown's Roman Catholic subjects—and forbade them from owning a horse...

Bentham, Jeremy

Bentham, Jeremy (1748–1832)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
4,298 words

...of punishment, are among aspects of his writings still read with interest. Bentham's published and unpublished writings are extensive, including large holdings of manuscripts at University College London and the British Library. The companion of his later years and literary executor, John Bowring , published the first, albeit incomplete, collection of Bentham's writings in 1838–43 . A collection of his economic writings appeared 1952–4 . More recently, the Bentham Committee based at University College London has overseen the production of the still to be...

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