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eustress

Any form of stress (1) that is beneficial, usually associated with a feeling of fulfilment and achievement rather than anxiety. [Formed from Greek eu well or good + English stress, on the ...

eustress

eustress   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... The positive or pleasant aspect of stress ; for example the demands of competition which produce positive responses of excitement and happiness. Compare distress...

eustress

eustress n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... n. Any form of stress ( 1 ) that is beneficial, usually associated with a feeling of fulfilment and achievement rather than anxiety. See also post-traumatic growth . [Formed from Greek eu well or good + English stress , on the model of distress...

eustress

eustress noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
46 words
eustress

eustress  

Any form of stress (1) that is beneficial, usually associated with a feeling of fulfilment and achievement rather than anxiety. [Formed from Greek eu well or good + English stress, on the model of ...
distress

distress  

A state of motivation relating to stress that the animal is unable to cope with. An animal may be in distress as a result of physical environmental factors, such as excessive cold or heat, or as a ...
stress

stress  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The force applied to a unit area of a substance measured in newtons per square metre. Compressive stress crushes the rock; see Bunds (2001) GSA Bull. 113, 7. Tensile stress is a force which tends to ...
stress

stress  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. any factor that threatens the health of the body or has an adverse effect on its functioning, such as injury, disease, overwork, or worry. The existence of one form of stress tends to diminish ...
distress

distress   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

...The negative, harmful aspects of stress. Compare eustress...

stress

stress n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... See also acute stress disorder , Baskerville effect , burnout , general adaptation syndrome , irritable male syndrome , post-traumatic stress disorder , prolonged duress stress disorder , psychoneuroimmunology , psychosocial stressor , voodoo death . Compare eustress . 2. In phonetics, the degree of force used in uttering a syllable, stressed syllables being more prominent than unstressed syllables, the prominence being due not only to increased loudness but also sometimes increased length and raised pitch. Also called accent . [From C14...

stress

stress   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Medicine and health
Length:
139 words

...a detrimental effect on body functions 3 A psychological condition occurring when individuals perceive a substantial imbalance between demands being made on them and their ability to meet those demands, where failure to do so has important consequences. See also distress , eustress , general adaptation syndrome , state anxiety , triad response...

stress

stress   Quick reference

Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...occurring when individuals feel unable to cope with the demands being made on them. They also believe that this failure will have important consequences. This condition is sometimes called distress, to distinguish it from the positive or pleasant aspects of stressful situations (eustress). Stress is usually associated with feeling a lack of control and involvement in the decisions which affect life and work. The jobs with the highest strain are those in which there is heavy pressure to perform, where hours and procedures are rigid, there is a threat of...

Psychoneuroendocrinology and Physical Activity

Psychoneuroendocrinology and Physical Activity   Reference library

Anthony C. Hackney and Eser Ağgön

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...has both a positive and a negative effect on an individual’s life. The environments and expectations associated with modern, contemporary society result in many daily opportunities to experience both negative stresses (referred to as distress) as well as positive stress (i.e., eustress; McEwen, 2000a , 2000b , 2005 ). Operationally, these different stresses can be defined as follows: • Distress—describes the life events and factors that result in the development of unpleasant feelings or emotions impacting a person’s functioning (both psychologically and...

Psychological Resilience and Adversarial Growth in Sport and Performance

Psychological Resilience and Adversarial Growth in Sport and Performance   Reference library

David Fletcher

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
15,149 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Wolpe, 1958 ), stress inoculation ( Meichenbaum, 1976 , 1977 ), steeling ( Rutter, 1987 ), psychophysiological toughness ( Dienstbier, 1989 , 1992 ), stress exposure ( Johnston & Cannon-Bowers, 1996 ; Driskell & Johnston, 1998 ), immunization ( Başoğlu et al., 1997 ), eustress ( Hargrove, Becker, & Hargrove, 2015 ), discretionary vulnerability ( Lotz, 2016 ), and pressure inurement ( Fletcher & Sarkar, 2016b ). Research investigating these concepts has found that moderate cumulative lifetime adversity is associated with more positive responses to...

The Medicalization of Stress

The Medicalization of Stress   Reference library

Vanessa L. Burrows

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of Modern Psychology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, History
Length:
10,838 words

...recommended that individuals pursue “diversionary activities,” such as painting, exercising, socializing—or even potentially harmful habits, like drinking alcohol or smoking tobacco. Selye insisted that stress can never be eradicated, but rather one must seek to balance their eustress (or “good stress”) and distress (or “bad stress”). Furthermore, because individuals responded to stressors differently, he argued that they must therefore hone their own ability to gauge harmful or productive stress in order to maintain health ( Selye, 1956 ). Despite the fact...

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