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establishment book

‘Establishment book’ is a term applied to a formal register or account book listing in detail, with their respective fees and order of precedence, the principal offices of the realm ... ...

Shape

Shape   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Shape of things to come, The The way the future will develop. The phrase derives from the title of a 1933 novel by H.G. Wells which chillingly predicted war in 1939 followed by plague, rebellion, the first rocketship to the moon and the establishment of a world government in 2059 . The book formed the basis of Alexander Korda ’s acclaimed film Things to Come ( 1935 ). Shape up or ship out, To Used in injunctions to improve performance or remove oneself/another from the scene. The expression originated in the US military in the mid-20th century. It...

Paparazzi

Paparazzi   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...scenarist, Ennio Flaiano , who himself took it from George Gissing ’s travel narrative By the Ionian Sea ( 1901 ). In this book, Gissing devotes two paragraphs to the worthy proprietor of the Albergo Centrale, Catanzaro, where he spent a few days in 1897 . He noted that the owner, Coriolano Paparazzo , had put up a notice on the door of each room expressing his regret that some of his clients chose to dine in other establishments. Flaiano found this ‘prestigious’ name, as he called it, in Sulle Rive dello Ionio ( 1957 ), Margherita Guidacci ’s...

anti-psychiatry

anti-psychiatry   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

..., a South African psychiatrist who collaborated with R. D. Laing and others in the establishment of Kingsley Hall , an experiment in community-psychiatry started in 1965 in East London. Mary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey through Madness ( 1971 ) written by one of the patients at Kingsley Hall in collaboration with her psychiatrist Joseph Berke offers a keen, but not altogether flattering insight into what anti-psychiatry meant in practice. In fact, the book did the movement a lot of damage by exposing what many of its critics saw as its...

anti-psychiatry

anti-psychiatry   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

..., a South African psychiatrist who collaborated with R. D. Laing and others in the establishment of Kingsley Hall , an experiment in community-psychiatry started in 1965 in East London. Mary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey through Madness ( 1971 ), written by one of the patients at Kingsley Hall in collaboration with her psychiatrist Joseph Berke , offers a keen but not altogether flattering insight into what anti-psychiatry meant in practice. In fact, the book did the movement a lot of damage by exposing what many of its critics saw as its...

Arendt, Hannah

Arendt, Hannah (1906–75)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...calls the homo sacer . Probably her most influential work, The Human Condition ( 1958 ) pursued the problems raised in the previous work by examining political action, specifically the establishment of rights. She gained public notoriety in 1963 when she reported on the Eichmann war crimes trials in Jerusalem for the New Yorker (later in the same year published in book form as Eichmann in Jerusalem ). Eichmann was responsible for a large proportion of the logistical side of the Holocaust, such as the sourcing, routing, and timetabling of trains that...

Arendt, Hannah

Arendt, Hannah (1906–75)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Critical Theory (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...calls the homo sacer . Probably her most influential work, The Human Condition ( 1958 ) pursued the problems raised in the previous work by examining political action, specifically the establishment of rights. She gained public notoriety in 1963 when she reported on the Eichmann war crimes trials in Jerusalem for the New Yorker (later in the same year published in book form as Eichmann in Jerusalem ). Eichmann was responsible for a large proportion of the logistical side of the Holocaust, such as the sourcing, routing, and timetabling of trains that...

Uncle

Uncle   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...and faithful old slave to a bad owner. The book helped in no small degree to arouse the American nation to an understanding of the iniquities of African-American slavery. The original of Uncle Tom is popularly identified as Josiah Henson ( 1789–1883 ), a slave who was subsequently ordained as a Methodist preacher, and who came to London in 1876 to be presented to Queen Victoria . The phrase ‘Uncle Tom’ is now used critically to denote a black person regarded as subservient or obsequious to the white establishment . Bob’s your uncle See under bob . Dutch...

Beefeaters

Beefeaters   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...). Not one of the quotations fixes the word on the Yeomen of the Guard, and that the English have been called Beefeaters none will deny. Even if the allusion given above could be certainly affixed to Yeomen of the Guard it would only prove that 150 or 160 years after their establishment in the palace they were so called (corruptly, humorously or otherwise). Arguments in favour of the old derivation : 1. Certainly Henry VII himself did not call these yeomen ‘beef-eaters.’ He was as much French as Welsh, and must have been familiar with the buffet ( bu-fey...

Red

Red   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...concoction of red wine and methylated spirit, such as an impoverished old biddy might drink. Red Book A directory relating to the court, the nobility and the upper ten generally. The Royal Kalendar , published from 1767 to 1893 , was known by this name, as also was Webster‘s Royal Red Book , a similar work first issued in 1847 . The Financial Statement and Budget Report, issued annually by H.M. Treasury, is also known informally as the ‘Red Book’. The name is also given to certain special works covered in red, such as the official parliamentary...

Glenstal Abbey

Glenstal Abbey   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Abbey . A Benedictine establishment in Murroe, Co. Limerick, founded in 1927 and maintaining a boarding school for boys. (The only other Benedictines ministering in Ireland are the sisters of Kylemore Abbey in Co. Galway.) Benedictines from Glenstal have been distinguished for the quality of their contribution to the intellectual discourse of modern Ireland, for their liturgy and music and, most recently, for The Glenstal Book of Prayer . See also Ní Riain, Nóirín...

Anacreon Moore

Anacreon Moore   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...'Tis Little! The young Catullus of his day As sweet, but as immoral in his lay. English Bards and Scotch Reviewers ( 1809 ) This reputation stuck with Moore, even after he had achieved establishment respectability. When his oriental verse romance Lalla Rookh was published on 27 May 1817 it was greeted with the following anonymous squib: Lalla Rookh Is a naughty book By Tommy Moore, Who has written four; Each warmer Than the former, So the most recent Is the least...

Malachy

Malachy (1095–1148)   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Malachy, putting his life in danger several times and retaining the diocese's treasure, including Patrick's staff and the priceless Book of Armagh . Having wrought the necessary reforms, Malachy relinquished his post to the abbot of Derry and returned to Connor, setting up an Augustinian foundation at Downpatrick. His greatest achievements were the final reconciliation of the Celtic church with Rome, the establishment of the canonical hours and the revival of the administration of the sacraments that had fallen into disuse. Formal papal recognition could...

Edgware

Edgware   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Road has become a focus for London's Arabic population, as has Queensway , its counterpart on the other side of Bayswater . The process may have begun with the tendency for wealthy Middle Eastern visitors to stay in hotels here and on nearby Park Lane , which led to the establishment of shops and restaurants dedicated to serving them. This in turn encouraged Arabic migrants, especially Lebanese, to settle in the...

royal

royal   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...museum, library, and information service. Royal jelly a substance secreted by honeybee workers and fed by them to larvae which are being raised as potential queen bees; in figurative use, the quality which means that someone can succeed in a preeminent role. Royal Mint the establishment responsible for the manufacture of British coins. Set up in 1810 in London, it moved in 1968 to Llantrisant in South Wales. Royal Society the oldest and most prestigious scientific society in Britain. It was formed by followers of Francis Bacon (including Robert Boyle ,...

Kensington

Kensington   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...'s house has grown several times over to become Kensington Palace . In 1685 the developer Thomas Young began to lay out Kensington Square but this long remained an isolated outpost of civilized London amid the fields and gravel pits that covered most of the parish. The establishment of the museums and colleges of Albertopolis enhanced Kensington's reputation in the second half of the 19th century and the district quickly filled with high-class stuccoed terraces and detached villas. Property developers made up the name ‘West Kensington’ for what had...

Westminster

Westminster   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...occupied by the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre). In 1994 it was amalgamated with other hospitals to form the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, which is situated in the Fulham Road . Westminster Palace See the Palace of Westminster . Westminster Pit A dog-fighting establishment that flourished on Duck Lane (now St Matthew Street) from about 1800 to 1835 . Bears were also baited and a bull terrier named Billy killed 100 rats in under 12 minutes at the pit in May 1821 . The pit held around 300 spectators, most of whom attended for the purpose of...

London broil

London broil   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...suggests, it specializes in economics and politics, but it also covers the broad spectrum of the social sciences and some other disciplines. Its first chairman was the economist and socialist Sidney Webb ( 1859–1947 ). Many influential figures in the political and economic establishments of Britain and other countries have studied here. It formerly had a reputation for radicalism, and many of its undergraduates took leading roles in the student unrest of the late 1960s, but in the 1980s it embraced Thatcherism. London Scottish FC A rugby union club originally...

Best and the brightest, The

Best and the brightest, The   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...positions. Traditionally they would have been recruited from Oxbridge in the UK, and the Ivy League universities in the United States. David Halberstam 's book The Best and the Brightest ( 1972 ) is the story of the young idealists in the administration of President John F. Kennedy ( see New Frontier ), and their role in the escalation of the Vietnam War. See also Establishment ; Great and the good...

Angry Young Man

Angry Young Man   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Back In Anger (first performed 1956 ) prompted the reporter George Fearon to apply the term to him, although it had already occurred in 1951 as the title of a book by the Irish writer Leslie Paul . Those so dubbed were typically young and of provincial lower-middle class or working-class origin, and they gained notoriety for their satirical treatment and criticism of the Establishment , with its false or outmoded social, moral, political and intellectual values. The name is also sometimes applied to some US writers of protest. See also Lucky Jim...

You are what you eat

You are what you eat   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...he eats.) Quoted in Jacob Moleschott , Lehre der Nahrungsmittel ( 1850 ) In the early 21st century the proverb was hijacked by Dr Gillian McKeith , who received her doctorate from the American Holistic College of Nutrition, a non-accredited establishment in Alabama. In 2004 McKeith published a bestselling diet book called You Are What You Eat and presented a Channel 4 TV series with the same title. She received The Guardian 's Bad Science Award in 2004...

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