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escheat

Subject: History

Escheated property reverted to a lord when a tenant was guilty of a felony or when he died without adult heirs. The term will often be found in manorial records.

escheat

escheat   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
31 words

... . Escheated property reverted to a lord when a tenant was guilty of a felony or when he died without adult heirs. The term will often be found in manorial...

escheat

escheat   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
31 words

... Escheated property reverted to a lord when a tenant was guilty of a felony or when he died without adult heirs. The term will often be found in manorial...

escheat

escheat   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
69 words

... ( escheator ) A process in feudal law whereby possession of land was negated and the property reverted to the tenant’s lord. Escheat could result from a variety of situations, including *distraint , forfeiture, or the tenant’s death without heirs. Escheats were overseen by a royal officer, known as the escheator. See also droit du seigneur ; feudalism . Andrew Shepard Rabin J. Hudson , Land, Law, and Lordship in Anglo-Norman England ...

escheat

escheat   Reference library

J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
76 words

... was the forfeiture of estates to the crown, or to the lord of the manor, when the owner or tenant died without heirs. It also applied to persons attainted, whose property passed to the crown. It was at times an important source of income, though estates were sometimes granted back to the attainted person’s descendants. In Scotland escheat for debt was abolished in 1737 . Escheat for felony was abolished in 1870 . J. A....

Escheat

Escheat   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
258 words

... In France In Italy In France The word aubain , perhaps meaning “from another Ban ”, is attested from the 9th c. and was used especially in France to designate the foreigner as subject to law. Individually or collectively, the foreigner had to have authorization to reside and his property rights were limited; especially, he could not transmit his property on his death, except by grace, whence the name droit d'aubaine given to the reversion of his property to the lord. In the kingdom of France, droit d'aubaine became royal from the 14th c., while...

escheat

escheat   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
157 words

...escheat In English property law, where a tenant under socage tenure left no heir on death, or was convicted and sentenced to death for a felony, escheat was an incident of tenure (entitlement of the feudal lord). The doctrine was that land that would otherwise fall ownerless reverted to the feudal overlord immediately superior to the landholder (now generally the crown in the UK). Escheat was an incident of socage tenure. By extension, escheat is loosely used for any reversion to the state upon an intestacy with no apparent heirs, and for unclaimed...

escheat

escheat   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
41 words

... lapsing of an estate to the overlord, estate so lapsed. XIV. — OF. eschete :- Rom. * excadecta , sb. use of pp. of * excadēre , for L. excidere fall away, pass away, escape the memory, f. EX- 1 + cadere fall. Hence vb. ...

escheat

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
132 words

... • accrete , autocomplete, beat, beet, bittersweet, bleat, cheat, cleat, clubfeet, compete, compleat, complete, conceit, Crete, deceit, delete, deplete, discreet, discrete, eat, effete, élite, entreat, escheat, estreat, excrete, feat, feet, fleet, gîte, greet, heat, leat, leet, Magritte, maltreat, marguerite, meat, meet, meet-and-greet, mesquite, mete, mistreat, neat, outcompete, peat, Pete, petite, pleat, receipt, replete, sangeet, seat, secrete, sheet, skeet, sleet, splay-feet, street, suite, sweet, teat, treat, tweet, wheat • backbeat • heartbeat •...

escheat

escheat n   Reference library

Oxford Business Spanish Dictionary: English-Spanish

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
7 words
escheat

escheat   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
113 words
escheat

escheat   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
157 words
escheat

escheat   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
65 words
escheat

escheat   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
70 words
escheat

escheat   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
73 words
escheat

escheat  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Escheated property reverted to a lord when a tenant was guilty of a felony or when he died without adult heirs. The term will often be found in manorial records.
allodial

allodial  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
An absolute form of land holding in which the entire estate is vested in the owners, subject only to liability to escheat (see also fee).
Leihezwang

Leihezwang  

Nineteenth-century scholarly term referring to the expectation, based on a variety of customs and contracts, that lords in the German Empire, especially rulers and princes, should grant escheats ...
fee

fee  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.A legal estate (other than leasehold) in land that is capable of being inherited. Since the Law of Property Act 1925 the term's only modern significance is in the phrase fee simple absolute in ...
statute of Westminster

statute of Westminster  

1290.The statute 18 Edw. I, known as Westminster III, was intended to prevent magnates being deprived of their feudal rights, such as escheat, marriage, or wardship, by the sale of estates. It is ...
compotus rolls

compotus rolls  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Accounts of royal and seigneurial estates. The records of royal escheators are kept in The National Archives under E 136 and 357. The compoti of manorial lords are mostly housed in local record ...

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