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endotrophic mycorrhiza

A type of mycorrhiza in which the fungal component penetrates the plant root, either pathogenically or beneficially. The fungal component does not change the root morphology. Compare ...

endotrophic mycorrhiza

endotrophic mycorrhiza   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
33 words

... mycorrhiza A type of mycorrhiza in which the fungal component penetrates the plant root, either pathogenically or beneficially. The fungal component does not change the root morphology . Compare ectotrophic mycorrhiza...

endotrophic mycorrhiza

endotrophic mycorrhiza  

A type of mycorrhiza in which the fungal component penetrates the plant root, either pathogenically or beneficially. The fungal component does not change the root morphology. Compare ectotrophic ...
ectotrophic mycorrhiza

ectotrophic mycorrhiza  

A mycorrhiza in which the fungal component forms 2 sheath layers around the roots of a plant, the inner layer forming a sense mesh of hyphae, called the hartig net. The close association of the ...
mycorrhiza

mycorrhiza  

The mutually beneficial association (see mutualism) formed between fungi and the roots of plants. This is a very common form of mutualism; the absorption of mineral ions by the plant roots is ...
Glomeromycota

Glomeromycota   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
32 words

...Glomeromycota A phylum of fungi that live as obligate symbionts in association with plant roots, forming endotrophic (or arbuscular) mycorrhizas . The hyphae lack cross-walls, and they reproduce asexually by producing...

mycorrhiza

mycorrhiza   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
81 words

... A close physical association between a fungus and the roots of a plant, from which both fungus and plant appear to benefit; a mycorrhizal root takes up nutrients more efficiently than does an uninfected root. A very wide range of plants can form mycorrhizas of one form or another, and some plants (e.g. some orchids and some species of Pinus ) appear incapable of normal development in the absence of their mycorrhizal fungi. See also ectotrophic mycorrhiza ; endotrophic mycorrhiza...

ectotrophic mycorrhiza

ectotrophic mycorrhiza   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Plant Sciences (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
68 words

...mycorrhiza A mycorrhiza in which the fungal component forms 2 sheath layers around the roots of a plant, the inner layer forming a sense mesh of hyphae , called the hartig net. The close association of the fungal and plant components causes changes in the root morphology giving rise to a palisade-like layer in the root cortex and increased root branching. Compare endotrophic mycorrhiza...

mycorrhiza

mycorrhiza   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biology (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
256 words

...) form a network of hyphae around the root and grow into the extracellular spaces of the root. They occur in association with about 10% of plant families, mostly woody species such as pine, oak, and birch. The hyphae of endotrophic mycorrhizas ( endomycorrhizas or arbuscular mycorrhizas ) enter the cortical cells of the host roots, where they form branching structures called arbuscules, which invaginate to fill individual host cells, while remaining enclosed by the host cell’s plasma membrane. These are found in over 85% of plant species,...

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