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emigration

Subject: History

The movement of individuals out of a country or area; the opposite of immigration.

emigration

emigration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Environment and Conservation (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... The movement of individuals out of a country or area; the opposite of immigration...

emigration

emigration   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
74 words

... A movement out of one country in order to settle in another; hence emigrants are people who leave. In 2010, Mexico had the highest number of emigrants (11.9 million), followed by India and the Russian Federation. Although emigration is a constant process, there are occasions when it achieves levels so high that it transforms societies. In the wake of the Great Famine in the 1840s, emigration from Ireland significantly depleted the country’s...

emigration

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A Dictionary of Geography (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...drivers of emigration. In a study of emigration from rural Albania , Vullnetari and King (2008) Glob. Netwks 8, 1 remind us that migration statistics are about real...

emigration

emigration   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
559 words

...Scots, and Welsh emigrated from rural poverty. Irish emigration apart, it was rarely a flight from destitution, since emigration cost money and under 10 per cent of emigrants received assistance. Earlier in the century, Malthusian fears of overpopulation had bred numerous schemes for ‘shovelling out paupers’ to Australia and Canada, but these colonies were understandably wary of such projects. As they gained greater autonomy they became increasingly concerned with attracting emigrants of quality. British emigration rose along with Britain's prosperity...

emigration

emigration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
639 words

...been articulated by historians and social observers. ‘Emigration’ from Ireland, however, departs from this world‐based conceptual structure in several ways. First, emigration is rarely seen as being part of a general migration process in which in‐migration is recognized as being as important as out‐migration. Secondly, emigration is usually treated as a singularly Irish phenomenon and not as part of larger processes which, in fact, affected all of western Europe during the same period. Third, emigration in much (though not all) of the literature is treated as...

emigration

emigration   Reference library

Ian John Ernest Keil

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
590 words

... is the departure of persons from their native country to settle permanently in another. This may be prompted by the ‘push’ of religious or political persecution or the ‘pull’ of work opportunities elsewhere. Governments have used emigration as a policy for keeping law and order at home and for populating new overseas colonies when empires expanded. In the British Isles the first of the relatively large-scale emigrations occurred with the opening up of the New World in the late 16th and 17th cents. Many of those who looked for greater political and...

emigration

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The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
855 words

...States have survived and some have been analysed. See Charlotte Erickson , ‘ Emigration to the USA from the British Isles ’, pt i : ‘Emigration from the British Isles’, pt ii : ‘Who Were the English Emigrants?’, Population Studies , 43 (1989) and 44 (1990) , and Emigration from Europe, 1815–1914: Select Documents (1976). An ongoing project to put lists of British outgoing passengers online will eventually cover the period 1890–1960 . Estimating the scale of emigration is complicated by the fact that large numbers eventually returned home. Some were...

emigration

emigration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontes

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
577 words

...emigration from the British Isles increased dramatically during the 19th century. Between 1837 and 1867 more than three million people from Great Britain and some two million from Ireland emigrated, most of the Irish emigrants leaving in the desperate years following the potato famine of 1847 . Some of Revd Patrick Brontë 's relatives joined the exodus: his brother William 's son John emigrated to New Zealand, John's brother Matthew became a carriage‐maker in Tennessee, and Matthew's son William Emmett ( 1841–1900 ) settled in Arkansas. Mr Brontë...

emigration

emigration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Scottish History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
4,324 words

...of the 1841 Select Committee that extensive state‐aided emigration was an essential preliminary to effective relief measures for the Highlands in the aftermath of the 1830s famine, it was only following the more devastating famine a decade later that the government responded, and even then the Emigration Advances Act of 1851 simply allowed landlords to borrow public money to assist tenants who wished to emigrate. In the absence of state funding, impecunious Highlanders were assisted to emigrate by a variety of organizations and individuals. In 1837 the...

Emigration

Emigration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Italian Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
704 words

... . Until the mid-19th c. the great majority of Italians lived their lives where they were born. Medieval Italian merchants and bankers spent periods away from home, but they commonly returned after relatively short stays. From the Renaissance onwards Italian artists, musicians, and writers, ranging from Pontormo to Metastasio and Goldoni , were invited to foreign courts and cities, and sometimes remained for years. Mass emigration developed quite suddenly. Even in 1861 the number of Italians resident abroad was officially calculated to be...

emigration

emigration   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,041 words

...think of emigrating, to California ( FFMC 56) and, in Farfrae's intended footsteps, to America ( MC 32) respectively, yet both are unthinkable out of their Wessex context. It may be that Hardy's dislike of emigration went back to resentment (perhaps his mother Jemima 's resentment) at the loss to the family of Martha Hand , her sister, to Canada in 1851 , and of two of the Sparks sisters, her nieces, to Queensland in 1870 . That recent departure appears in The Hand of Ethelberta , where the butler Chickerel 's daughters emigrate to Queensland...

Innere Emigration

Innere Emigration   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
128 words

...Emigration , term used for the state of mental reservation which those dissenting from National Socialism were obliged to impose upon themselves if they were unwilling to incur draconian penalties by expressing their disagreement. F. Thieß introduced it in 1946 in a dispute involving Th. Mann , in which he distinguished between ‘inner’ and ‘outer’ emigration (äußere Emigration). The expectation that the end of the National Socialist regime in 1945 would reveal a considerable number of important MSS. for publication as a result of ‘inner emigration’...

Irish emigration

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The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
777 words

...emigration The population of Ireland rose from over 4 million in 1781 to over 8 million in 1841 . Long before the famine years of the late 1840s Irish men and women emigrated to England and South Wales, and to a lesser extent to Scotland, in search of work. Both men and women were conspicuous as seasonal harvesters in many rural parts of the ‘mainland’. The Irish formed a significant proportion of the navvies who constructed the canals and railways . Numbers of emigrants increased after the formation of the United Kingdom in 1801 ; the 1841 ...

Irish emigration

Irish emigration   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
201 words

...emigration . The population of Ireland rose from over 4 million in 1781 to over 8 million in 1841 . Long before the famine years of the late 1840s Irish men and women emigrated to England and south Wales, and to a lesser extent to Scotland, in search of work. The famine years from 1846 onwards saw massive emigration from Ireland to the rest of the United Kingdom and to the United States of America. By the end of the 19th century the population of Ireland had dropped to half the size it had attained by 1851 . The favourite destinations for those who...

emigration and colonization

emigration and colonization   Reference library

Leon Litvack

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,356 words

... and colonization . Dickens had practical, fictional, and personal interests in emigration and colonization. The years of his life saw the development of Australia , the settling of New Zealand, the Durham Report, Canadian Confederation, the expansion of South Africa, the exploration of tropical Africa, the establishment of coastal colonies, the extension of British rule in India , and an uprising against colonial rule in Jamaica ( see Eyre, Edward John ). By the later 1840s circumstances such as the increased pressures of industrial labour, coupled...

Emigration To Africa

Emigration To Africa   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619–1895: From the Colonial Period to the Age of Frederick Douglass

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,363 words

...under its patronage. The most consistent black advocates of emigration were Martin R. Delany , Henry Highland Garnet , Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, and Alexander Crummell . Many came to support emigration because of political events of the 1850s, notably the Compromise of the 1850 , the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 , and the Dred Scott case, which gave cause for many black leaders to leave the country, fearing they would never have a future in the United States. All supporters of emigration insisted that blacks' greatest hope was the establishment of...

immigration and emigration

immigration and emigration   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
988 words

...and emigration At their most basic, immigration refers to people entering a country and emigration refers to those leaving. Usually, however, immigration refers to those who enter a country with the intent to live there on an on‐going basis. Tourists and those staying for a defined time, such as students and temporary workers, generally are not considered to be immigrants. The law pays far more attention to immigration than to emigration. Despite the international nature of immigration and emigration, international law pays little attention to these...

African American Emigration

African American Emigration   Reference library

Winston James

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Social History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... in 1859 and later decided to settle there. An even smaller number of African Americans emigrated from the United States during the twentieth century than during the nineteenth. The efforts of the black-nationalist Universal Negro Improvement Association in the 1920 s to facilitate the large-scale emigration of African Americans to Africa were abortive. Even more than the movement during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, African American emigration in the twentieth century was largely the preserve of its disaffected intelligentsia and...

Afro-Brazilian Emigration to Africa

Afro-Brazilian Emigration to Africa   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Africa

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...Emigration to Africa The phenomenon of African former slaves returning to their original homes has thus far not received the attention it deserves. Pierre Verger has done much work on the relationship between Brazil and West Africa, and several others have written on the subject. More needs to be done, however, to clarify the motivations and the influences that determined the former slaves’ attitudes and reactions on returning to their home areas. This essay examines the attitudes, occupations, and contributions of Brazilian returnees to West...

émigration

émigration nf   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford-Hachette French Dictionary: French-English (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
4 words

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