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elephant

A potential customer who would bring in a good amount of revenue if successfully converted to a fully paying customer. See also whale.

Elephants

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The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
366 words

... (sing. ἐλέφας). The Byz. knew both the African and Indian elephant; Kosmas Indikopleustes (3:353–54) distinguished between the Indians, who domesticated the elephant, and the Africans, who hunted them. Byz. armies frequently encountered war elephants during the Persian Wars ( Prokopios , Buildings 2.1.11; Agath. 110.8–11, 119.4–8). In the early 7th C. Herakleios made a triumphal entrance into Constantinople in a chariot drawn by four elephants that were exhibited in the circus and the Hippodrome ( Nikeph . 22.20). By that time, however, the...

Elephants

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The Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Religion, Social sciences
Length:
3,385 words

...with her house on her back and turned into an elephant. In Sierra Leone, Liberia, Senegal, and the Gambia, women's secret societies identify with elephants and use elephant masks as symbols of female strength, maternity, and wisdom. In Onitsha, Nigeria, it is praise to call an old woman an elephant, and proper for her to dance in rituals with the ponderous steps of a pachyderm. The near “genocide” of elephants has reduced the frequency of human encounters with elephants. For many Africans, wild elephants are but a memory. However, even now some Africans...

elephants

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John F. Lazenby

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
523 words

... Although ivory was known to the prehistoric Greeks and is mentioned in Homer , they first encountered war-elephants at Gaugamela in 331 bc . The ivory probably came originally from Africa, but the first war-elephants were Indian ( Elephas maximus ). Although not used by Alexander the Great, war-elephants were used by his successors, particularly the Seleucids and Ptolemies. When the Seleucids gained control of the Indian sources, the Ptolemies managed to capture and train African ‘forest’ elephants ( Loxodonta africana cyclotis ), then found...

elephants

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The Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
423 words

... Although ivory is mentioned in Homer , Greeks first encountered war‐elephants at Gaugamela in 331 bc . The ivory probably came originally from Africa, but the first war‐elephants were Indian. Although not used by Alexander (2) the Great, war‐elephants were used by his successors, esp. the Seleucids and Ptolemies ( see egypt, Ptolemaic  ). When the Seleucids gained control of the Indian sources, the Ptolemies managed to capture and train African ‘forest’ elephants, then found in the hinterland of the Red Sea. Smaller than Indian elephants,...

Elephants

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Encyclopedia of Global Change

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Science and technology, Environmental Science, Social sciences, Environment
Length:
3,100 words
Illustration(s):
2

... [ This case study focuses on the threats to elephants as a result of heavy hunting, human density, and land cultivation and considers steps for the conservation of African and Asian elephants .] There are two extant species of elephant, the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). They are the largest land mammals, and the only living members of a large family of elephants, the Elephantidae, which fossil studies reveal as dominating the Pleistocene (1,600,000 to 10,000 years bp ) faunas of Africa, Eurasia, and...

elephants

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John F. Lazenby

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
553 words

... Although ivory was known to the prehistoric Greeks and is mentioned in Homer , they first encountered war-elephants at Gaugamela in 331 bc . The ivory probably came originally from Africa, but the first war-elephants were Indian ( Elephas maximus ). Although not used by Alexander ( 3 ) the Great, war-elephants were used by his successors, particularly the Seleucids and Ptolemies ( see ptolemy (1) ). When the Seleucids gained control of the Indian sources, the Ptolemies managed to capture and train African ‘forest’ elephants ( Loxodonta...

Elephants

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The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...options, so it soon became the favored hunting ground. The capture and training of the elephants was handled by mahouts from India. After the battle of Raphia in 217 bce during which African elephants proved less powerful than Indian elephants, the elephant troop became less and less important in the Ptolemaic army. Under Ptolemy V the experiment was abandoned. There are no traces of the elephant in the religious realm of ancient Egypt. With the exception of elephants put on display in the New Kingdom, in dynastic times interest was focused exclusively...

Elephants

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The Encyclopedia of Mammals (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
6,457 words
Illustration(s):
8

...to its feet. Young female elephants called “allomothers” play a key role in bringing up young elephants. They increase the calves' chances of survival by their efforts, and at the same time gain experience for the time when they too will become mothers. The supposed existence of elephant graveyards is a myth, although it is possible that old elephants whose days are numbered may congregate on riverbanks to feed on the lush vegetation. Some countries have also seen elephant killing-fields, where poachers have left dead elephants strewn across the landscape....

Elephants and Relatives

Elephants and Relatives   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of Mammals (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,229 words
Illustration(s):
2

...and shed from the front. Elephants have very high‐crowned molars, and both elephants and manatees have taken advantage of the fact that mammalian molars erupt in sequence from the back of the jaw in a way so as to prolong the effective life of their dentition. Elephants delay the timing of molar eruption so that only one tooth is in use in the jaw at any one time. Each tooth has been greatly enlarged to the size of the entire back of the jaw; when one tooth wears down, the erupting tooth behind moves in to take its place. Elephants have six teeth in each jaw...

Pink elephants

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Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...elephants . The hallucinatory creatures supposedly seen by those in the throes of delirium tremens. ‘Pink spiders’ are an earlier variant manifestation. The phrase dates from the...

pink elephants

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The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
10 words
pink elephants

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New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
30 words
pink elephants

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Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
34 words
elephant('s) trunk

elephant('s) trunk adjective   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
39 words

...('s) trunk adjective Brit, dated Rhyming slang for ‘drunk’. Also elephants . 1859 –. Evening Standard He came home and found the artful dodger elephant trunk in the bread and butter (He found the lodger drunk in the gutter) ( 1931...

elephants

elephants  

The elephant is the largest living land animal, and is taken as a type of something of great size and weight. The Indian elephant was traditionally used as a beast of burden and in the ancient world ...
elephant

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The Oxford Dictionary of Idioms (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
147 words

... the elephant in the corner ( or room ) an embarrassing or awkward topic that everyone is aware of but no one wishes to discuss. 2003 CNN Of course, the elephant in the corner for all these developments is Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the Palestinian Authority. 2004 New York Times When it comes to the rising price of oil, the elephant in the room is the ever-weakening United States dollar. see the elephant see the world; get experience of life. US 🅘 An elephant is used here to symbolize or typify something which is extremely remarkable...

elephant

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A Dictionary of Marketing (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
24 words

... A potential customer who would bring in a good amount of revenue if successfully converted to a fully paying customer. See also whale...

elephant

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Shane Bjornlie

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Symbol of imperial power and conquest in ceremony , spectacle, and art. Although viewed in Zoroastrianism as creatures of Ahriman , elephants accompanied Persian armies in the 3rd century (e.g. HA Gordian, III) and the 6th and 7th centuries ( Evagrius , HE V, 14; Sebeos , 11). Sculptural reliefs at Taq-e Bostan in Media show elephants used in royal hunting expeditions. Ammianus describes the terror which the noise, smell, and appearance of Persian elephants aroused in Roman armies (XXV, 1, 14; 3, 4). Romans had access to elephants in ...

elephant

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The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... the only survivor of the zoological order Proboscidea, which formerly included the mammoth and the mastodon, known from cave paintings and fossils. The two principal species of elephant are Loxodonta africana , the sway-backed African elephant, and Elephas maximus , the Asian elephant. The latter, which is somewhat smaller than the former (4 tons as opposed to 6) is an endangered species, and the African elephant is now also in need of conservation. This need is not an entirely new phenomenon. There were elephants in ancient Egypt, where their meat...

elephant

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
186 words

... Largest land animal, the only surviving member of the mammal order Proboscidea, which included the mammoth and the mastodon . It is native to Africa ( Loxodonta africana ) and India ( Elephas maximus ). The tusks, the source of ivory, are elongated upper incisors. The Indian cow (female) elephant has no tusks. The trunk is an elongated nose and upper lip that it uses for drinking and picking up food. The African elephant is taller and heavier than the Indian. A bull (male) elephant may weigh as much as 7000kg (eight tonnes), and can charge at speeds...

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