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Overview

dumb bomb

A bomb that is neither powered nor guided and depends on accurate dropping on the target for its effectiveness.

dumb bomb

dumb bomb   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... bomb a bomb that is neither powered nor guided and depends on accurate dropping on the target for its...

dumb bomb

dumb bomb  

A bomb that is neither powered nor guided and depends on accurate dropping on the target for its effectiveness.
Precision‐Guided Munitions

Precision‐Guided Munitions   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...to have been unfounded. The measurement used to determine bombing efficiency is known as circular error probable or CEP. The CEP is the radial distance from a target inscribing an imaginary circle with an area large enough so that 50 percent of the bombs dropped fall within it. The CEP during World War II was 3,300 feet; in the Vietnam War and the Persian Gulf War, it was 6 feet. The drawback with PGM is cost. A iron “dumbbomb or an unguided rocket is much less expensive than a precision‐guided bomb or missile. Concerns about the costs and reliability and...

B

B   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...short vowel ( abbey, rabbit, ribbon, rubber, rubble ), but many others do not ( cabin, debit, double, habit, robin ). See gemination . Silent B B is silent after syllable-final m ( dumb, numb, tomb ), including in some words of Germanic origin in which it was formerly pronounced ( climb, comb, dumb, lamb, womb ) and in French-derived words with final mb ( aplomb, bomb, jamb, plumb, succumb, tomb ). In a number of words, a silent b has been added by analogy : crumb, limb, numb, thumb . In some of these, it was created by backformation from words of...

Weaponry, Air Force

Weaponry, Air Force   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...weapons. (The Than Hoa Bridge near Hanoi defied over 800 “dumb” attacks, but was destroyed by four F‐4 Phantoms on the first sortie with “smart bombs.”) Since the Vietnam War, air force weaponry has increased greatly in variety and power. None of the weapons are entirely new in concept, but technological advances have dramatically improved their accuracy and effectiveness. Large stocks of free‐fall nuclear, chemical, and high‐explosive bombs are retained. The high‐explosive types, including cluster bomb units, can still be used to considerable effect—during ...

chinesische Mauer, Die

chinesische Mauer, Die   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to German Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
278 words

...to retain the love which Mee Lan was at first willing to bestow on him. He is present when a dumb man, believed to be a dangerous rebel (Min Ko), is tortured because he will not speak, but has not the courage to make more than a half-hearted attempt to intervene, whereupon Mee Lan rejects him and disappears with Don Juan. ‘Der Heutige’ pulls himself together and makes an impassioned speech against the monstrous dangers of a technology which has produced the atom bomb. His hearers applaud, and the Emperor rewards his splendid oration with a gold chain, but no...

Peake, Mervyn (Lawrence)

Peake, Mervyn (Lawrence) (1911–68)   Reference library

Mick Imlah

The Oxford Companion to Modern Poetry (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...ten jagged lines. The creative energy of Peake the novelist is glimpsed in ‘Reverie of Bone’, whose length (thirty-eight six-line stanzas), as well as its subject, may reflect his experience of mass graves; the poem is covered with striking phrases (‘arctic filigree of feet’, ‘the dumb bullion of the shrouding clay’) but itself lacks a skeleton. A re-evaluation of Peake’s verse is offered by Collected Poems , ed. RobertWarner Maslen ( 2008 ), a third of which was previously unpublished. See also Complete Nonsense (2011—both Carcanet). Mick Imlah...

Scented Gardens for the Blind

Scented Gardens for the Blind   Reference library

Kim Worthington

The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
521 words

...cultural and spiritual depravity and its deadly ‘progress’ towards nuclear self-annihilation: ‘the flash in the sky, the deep burn of words that destroy all power to create, the time of a first degree language so articulate that … those who have spoken one word of it are struck dumb and forbidden ever to speak again.’ The novel opens with a chapter in the first person voice of Vera Glace, a woman feigning blindness (‘Blind I am safe’), fearing the light of visionary truth. Chapter 2 is written in the limited third person with extensive passages of interior...

shell-shock

shell-shock   Reference library

Ben Shephard

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,019 words

.... The term ‘shell-shock’, coined by British soldiers in the autumn of 1914 and first used in print by the Cambridge psychologist C. S. Myers early the following year, referred to the strange symptoms—such as paralysis, dumbness, deafness, blindness, and disordered gait—which soldiers developed after being exposed to shell-fire at the front. The ‘vivid, terse name’ was then quickly taken up by the press and ‘shell-shock’ became reified in the public mind as a specific disorder. Medical thinking was divided. There were at first those (like ...

statistics

statistics   Reference library

Richard Overy

The Oxford Companion to World War II

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...it is difficult to imagine that states today could afford its cost and level of sacrifice without intolerable strain. Behind the printed figures lies another story of populations subjected for years to extraordinary strains and losses. On issues such as these statistics remain dumbly eloquent. See also demography . Statistics, Table 6: Sources of oil supply for major combatant powers Germany (000 tonnes) Home Production Total Imported Natural Synthetic from the USSR from Romania War booty 1939 5,165 1,465 2,200 5 848 745 1940 2,075 1,465 3,348 617 1,177...

O'Brien, Flann

O'Brien, Flann   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
3,211 words

...is interrupted by the collective voice of the Plain People of Ireland, who allow Myles to mock and indulge an imagined readership. Sudden, outlandish puns take over the text—“I was the most inveterate smoker in the you and I, Ted King (dumb)”—sometimes to pointed effect: “Talking still of the abombic tomb—I meant atomic bomb, but leave it, I am a neutron in such matters.” More elaborately, the Catechism of Cliché plays solemn havoc with familiar forms of words: What nourishing confection for which the city of Dublin is famous the world over does it take?...

Japanese Fiction

Japanese Fiction   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Literature
Length:
2,900 words

...discussed in the major American or British literary reviews. Certainly part of the blame must be placed on a decline in the quality of contemporary fiction in Japan, where the appeal to a popular audience has resulted, as it has in so many other parts of the world, in a general dumbing-down of style as well as content. One must look long and hard for a writer today whose sense of literary tradition extends back further than the 1960s, and most often the cultural referents—if they are to be found at all—are the Beatles and the sexual revolution. While a reader...

The Information and Communication Revolution and International Relations

The Information and Communication Revolution and International Relations   Reference library

Jonathan D. Aronson and Peter F. Cowhey

The International Studies Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Warfare and Defence
Length:
8,701 words
Illustration(s):
2

...trend involves the end points on the ICT networks: What are their number, scope (ubiquity), and heterogeneity? How many and what type of processors and data sources connect at the edge of the network? Consider the evolution of terminals. First there were voice-only dumb terminals, then there were dumb data terminals, and finally powerful, networked personal computer ( PC ) terminals emerged. The number, ubiquity, and heterogeneity of network end points accelerated as PC connections to the internet proliferated and as voice and data mobility spread. The second...

Terror, War on

Terror, War on   Reference library

Robert S. Singh

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...well as for his most critical opponents, Senator Barack Obama 's candidacy for the presidency in 2008 promised a decisive rejection of the Bush years and its central defining characteristic, the war on terror. But although Obama regularly lambasted the Iraq intervention as a “dumb” war, he explicitly made clear that he did not oppose all wars. Indeed, although he recited mainstream criticisms of aspects of Bush policies and tactics—as did his opponent in the Democratic primary, Hillary Clinton —nowhere did he repudiate the overall thrust of antiterrorist...

Levine, Philip

Levine, Philip   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Literature
Length:
6,252 words

... The Horse . This free-verse poem recounts a myth resulting from the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima as related to Levine by a survivor. The painful imagery sets a scene in compelling detail, and although this is a poem of political outrage, the politics never overtake the language or the story of the poem. The speaker looks at the people, seeing what they see—the mass hallucination of the apocalyptic white horse careening through the city following the bomb blast, and radioactive fire storms. The horse would never return. There had been no horse. I...

Novel

Novel   Reference library

Beatriz de Alba-Koch, Beatriz de Alba-Koch, Josna Rege, Harry Aveling, and Teri Shaffer Yamada

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
6,398 words
Illustration(s):
1

...everyday events. Other significant early works include the Malay Hikayat Faridah Hanom (The Story of Faridah Hanum , 1925–1926 ) by Syed Sheikh al-Hadi ; the Indonesian Siti Nurbaya (named after its heroine, 1921 ) by Marah Rusli ; the robust Vietnamese satire So Do (Dumb Luck, 1936 ) by Vu Trong Phung ; and the Cambodian novel Tik Tonlesap (The Water of the Tonlesap, 1939 ). Most of these works included prominent didactic themes; and the debate about the role of literature in society, whether for its own sake or social improvement, has...

Environmental Issues

Environmental Issues   Reference library

Nicolaas Mink

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...steam tractors, and disk plows made by International Harvester, Ford, and John Deere supplanted horse-pulled sulky-plows, threshers, and harvesters on farms in all parts of the country. The tractor, said one farmer, turned him from “a clod into an operator; from a dumb brute into a mechanic.” These machines—supported by the desire to turn food production into a highly capitalized, efficient enterprise—annihilated the native grasses that held prairie ecosystems intact. Wheat, oats, corn, and other field crops replaced bluestems, fescues, and...

Cinema

Cinema   Reference library

Lucy Fischer, Yves Laberge, and Gwendolyn Audrey Foster

The Oxford Encyclopedia Women in World History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History
Length:
8,222 words
Illustration(s):
2

...Mary Pickford as America's sweetheart, Theda Bara as a vampire, and Joan Crawford as the New Woman. Reconceptualizing Women in Film. Eventually critics became impatient with the “images” approach because it often labeled representations as either retrograde (the showgirl, the dumb blonde, the temptress) or progressive (the career woman, the adventuress, the tomboy), foregrounding a film's plot and ignoring its style and special status as a medium. Some sought to historicize the stereotypes. In her book The Wages of Sin , Lea Jacobs investigated the...

Punctuation

Punctuation   Reference library

Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
7,920 words

...apparent.” See ( q ). I. Exclamation Point [!]. This mark is used after an exclamatory word, phrase, or sentence. It usually counts as the concluding full stop—e.g.: “I can almost hear the producer saying, ‘Cut! Too much talk!’ ” Phillip Lopate , “The Last Taboo,” in Dumbing Down: Essays on the Strip Mining of American Culture 164, 173 ( 1996 ). If used within square brackets in or after a quotation, it expresses the quoter’s amusement, dissent, or surprise. J. Hyphen [-]. This mark has been called “the pest of the punctuation family” ( Sophie...

Paris

Paris   Reference library

Virginia Scott, Jan Clarke, W. D. Howarth, and David Bradby

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre and Performance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
8,597 words

...between tragedy and comedy and pioneered by Diderot as a means of portraying the lives of ordinary people and drawing attention to their problems; the opening scene of his Le Père de famille ( Father of the Family ) shows a game of backgammon in progress, with lengthy dumb show before a word is spoken. No less sentimental than the previous generation's ‘tearful comedy’, the drames bourgeois of Diderot and others were written in a prose which brought the problems they dealt with home to a bourgeois audience, factors which helped to prepare the...

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