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dullahan

Subject: Religion

[Ir. dubh, dark; cf. Ir. lucharachán, pigmy, puny creature; Ir. lachan, reed; ScG lachan, hearty laugh]. Headless phantom, on horseback or in horse-drawn coach, in Irish ...

dullahan

dullahan   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... , dúlachan , dulacaun , dullaghan , dubhlachan [Ir. dubh , dark; cf. Ir. lucharachán , pigmy, puny creature; Ir. lachan , reed; ScG lachan , hearty laugh]. Headless phantom, on horseback or in horse-drawn coach, in Irish folklore. The dullahan rides a headless horse or may ride in a coach drawn by headless horses. His face is the colour and texture of mouldy cheese; his eyes make a bridge from ear to ear; his huge eyes dart like flies. But the dullahan can put on or take off this hideous head at will, or play ghoulish ball-games with it. His...

Dullahan

Dullahan   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
9 words

... • GB frequency 1881: 0 Irish : See Dullaghan...

dullahan

dullahan  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ir. dubh, dark; cf. Ir. lucharachán, pigmy, puny creature; Ir. lachan, reed; ScG lachan, hearty laugh].Headless phantom, on horseback or in horse-drawn coach, in Irish folklore. The dullahan rides a ...
angau

angau  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A personification of death in early Welsh tradition. See also ANKOU; DEATH COACH; DULLAHAN; FAR DOROCHA; YANNIG.
gan ceann

gan ceann  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ir., without a head].Headless, somewhat threatening Irish fairy, comparable to the dullahan. Unlike other fairies, he fears gold; a gan ceann would have overtaken a boat for America if not for a ...
ankou

ankou  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A spectral figure portending death in Breton folklore, a counterpart of the Greek Thanatos. The ankou is usually the spirit of the last person to die in a community. Sometimes male, but more often ...
far dorocha

far dorocha  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
[Ir. fear dorcha, dark man]. A malevolent fairy, the chief agent of mortal abduction. Usually portrayed as the butler-like servant of the fairy queen, he carries out her commands without emotion or ...
death coach

death coach  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
Spectral vehicle in Irish folklore whose stopping at the door announced the death of a resident the next day. As the driver is headless and the horses are either black or headless, the death coach is ...
dubhlachan

dubhlachan   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

.... Variant spelling of dullahan...

dulachan

dulachan   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., dulacaun . . Variant spellings of dullahan...

angau

angau   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

..., angeu . . A personification of death in early Welsh tradition. See also ANKOU ; DEATH COACH ; DULLAHAN ; FAR DOROCHA ; YANNIG...

gan ceann

gan ceann   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...ceann , gan-ceann [Ir., without a head]. Headless, somewhat threatening Irish fairy , comparable to the dullahan . Unlike other fairies, he fears gold; a gan ceann would have overtaken a boat for America if not for a gold pin dropped in his path. Confused with but very different from the ganconer...

goblin

goblin   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...malevolent, diminutive sprite originates outside Celtic tradition and is only applied to it figuratively. Only a few supernatural creatures from Celtic folklore are ever called goblins: the Welsh colynau [a translation of the English] and bwgan , and the Irish cluricaune and dullahan . See also FAIRY . See Wirt Sikes , British Goblins (London,...

elf

elf   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...magic-wielding creature that derives from Teutonic origin has only one close counterpart in the Celtic world, the Welsh ellyll . Other parallels can be found only through forced analogy. The Irish leprechaun makes an inexact analogue, although the cluricaune and dullahan and Cornish piskie come closer. The Irish word síabraid is sometimes translated as ‘elf’. See also FAIRY . The English word elf translates inexactly into Celtic languages other than Welsh: ModIr. clutharachán, lucharachán; ScG s‘thiche; Manx trollag; Corn....

far dorocha

far dorocha   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...tea or retrieve on his black charger a desired mortal. Silently obedient to his queen, he is able to make all surrender their wills to his command. Although many have journeyed with the far dorocha to fairyland, few have returned with him. See ANGAU ; ANKOU ; DEATH COACH ; DULLAHAN...

death coach

death coach   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...headless, the death coach is sometimes called the headless coach. If it is seen passing it should not be stopped, as someone will die near the spot where it comes to rest. Sometimes the banshee rides the coach or may fly in the air near it. At other times the headless phanton dullahan drives. Fallen bridges offer no obstacle to the death coach. Although the death coach seems uniquely Irish, it is a variant on international tale type 335; see also the ANGOU of Wales; ANKOU of Brittany; FAR DOROCHA . While the death coach is found in Irish oral...

ankou

ankou   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...driver of the death coach in Irish folklore, the ankou appears to draw more from the Grim Reaper in medieval Christian folklore. The 19th-century writer Anatole le Braz suggested that the ankou is a survival of the prehistoric dolmen-builders of Brittany . See also ANGAU ; DULLAHAN ; FAR DOROCHA ; YANNIG...

fairy

fairy   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... devil , a perception not widely shared; such fairies, however, may be on close terms with death. Among those fairies classed as solitary are the banshee , baobhan sith , brownie , bwci , cadineag , caoineag , caointeag , cluricaune , dooiney marrey , dooiney oie , dullahan , ellyll , fairy lover [Ir. leannán sídhe/sí ] , fenodyree , fr'de/fridean , glaistig , gruagach , leprechaun, piskie , pooka , pwca , síabraid , s'thich . In defining the two divisions W. B. Yeats ( 1888 ) introduced the term ‘trooping fairies’ for those perceived...

Dullaghan

Dullaghan   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
64 words

...Variants: Dollaghan , Dullahan • Current frequencies: GB 168, Ireland 16 • GB frequency 1881: 1 • Main Irish location 1847–64: Louth Irish : from Ó Dubhlacháin , ‘descendant of Dubhlachán’, a personal name apparently meaning ‘black duckling’. Early bearers Philip O'Dwlchen , 1600 in Fiants Elizabeth §6459 (Ely); James O'Devlaghan , 1663 in Hearth Money Rolls, Ireland (Tullintrain, Cumber, Derry). Dullaghan, 1881 frequency. © Archer...

Primitives

Primitives   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of Popular Music (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Music
Length:
351 words

...singles failed to emulate the success of ‘Crash’ and the follow-up album, Pure , was only a partial success. The Primitives ended the 80s touring the USA and returned to the UK to undergo extensive touring around Britain, hoping to regenerate those brief glory days. Both Dullahan and Tweedie would join Hate, while Hobson’s tenure in the bass position was a fleeting one, being replaced in 1989 by Paul Sampson. When Galore failed to sell, the Primitives disbanded. There is still an audience for the Primitives’ catalogue, which is regularly represented by...

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