You are looking at 1-20 of 2,985 entries  for:

clear all

View:

Overview

deer

Subject: Religion

The familiar ruminant, swift-footed animal of European forests (Cervidae) has long played an important role in the Celtic imagination, especially the male of the species, the mighty horned ...

deer

deer   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Agriculture and Land Management

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
136 words

... Six species of native or naturalized deer exist in Britain. The truly native deer include the red deer ( cervus elaphus ), which is the largest and is more associated with the open hill country of Scotland and some parts of England. The roe ( capreolus capreolus ) is smaller and more widespread. The fallow deer ( Dama dama ) was probably reintroduced in Norman times, and was a favoured species that particularly adapted to the confines of a deer park which might be associated with a rural mansion. The sika ( cervus nippon ), muntjac ( muntiacus reevesi ), and...

deer

deer   Reference library

Oliver Nicholson and Michael Decker

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Red deer ( cervus elaphus ), fallow deer ( dama dama ), and roe deer ( capreolus capreolus ) were widely distributed in Europe and western Asia in Late Antiquity. Venison was common and cheap; the Tetrarchic Price Edict (4, 44) assigned it a value equal to pork. Deer were kept in parks for hunting and food . There was a paradeisos near the cave at Taq-e Bostan which is decorated with relief carvings of the Persian King hunting deer in enormous numbers, and deer are shown being hunted on the Piazza Armerina mosaics in Sicily . Justinian ’s ...

deer

deer   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...In the vernacular tradition of Celtic countries deer commonly entice heroes into the realm of the gods. Sálbuide, son of the king of Munster , died in a deer chase, along with thirty warriors, thirty attendants, and thirty deer-hounds. In another Irish story a jealous woman turned 100 girls into deer. Both mortals and fairies may be turned into deer. Lugaid Laígde , the Érainn king, pursued a fawn who was the divine personification of Ireland. Shape-shifting Mongán takes the form of a deer. Aige was transformed into a fawn. When Pryderi and...

Deer

Deer   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
693 words

... . The white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus ), one of the larger food animals and the bigger of two deer species present in Mesoamerica, was hunted from very early times. Deer might be driven into a large net and speared, caught with nooses or tree snares, or shot with arrows. Speared deer are depicted in Maya and Central Mexican codices; the Maya Codex Madrid shows deer in tree snares. Rites celebrated successful hunts, and deer-hunting is still accompanied by ritual in Mesoamerica. Modern hunters ask the underworld earth lords for permission to...

deer

deer   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
100 words

... Long-legged, hoofed, ruminant . There are 53 species in 17 genera distributed worldwide. In most species, the male (buck, hart or stag) bears antlers. Only in reindeer does the female (hind or doe) bear antlers. Deer often gather in herds. They are generally brown, with spotted young (fawns) and eat bark, shoots, twigs and grass. Humans exploit them for their meat (venison), hides and antlers (for hunting trophies). The deer family Cervidae has existed since the Oligocene epoch. The Chinese water deer is the smallest, measuring 55cm (22in) tall at the...

Deer

Deer   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

... [ScG doire , forest; cf. deur , tear] . Monastery and village in north Aberdeenshire that has figured prominently in Scottish history. Although thought to have been founded in the 6th century by Colum Cille [St Columba] and his Scottish disciple Drostán , the site was occupied by the Cistercians in 1218–19 . The Latin Book of Deer , c. 9th century, contains some added Gaelic entries, c. 1130– c. 1150 , and so precedes that first great collection of Gaelic writing, the Book of the Dean of Lismore , by four centuries. Popular tradition asserts that...

deer

deer   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...deer. The deer which are the main sources of meat for human consumption, whether they are truly wild deer or ‘farmed’ animals from a protected environment, belong to just four species, all of an intermediate size. Their use in cookery is described under venison (the name usually applied to the meat of deer, with certain exceptions such as reindeer meat). The four species are: ◆ The roe deer , Capreolus capreolus , of N. Europe (French, chevreuil ). This was almost extinct in the Scottish Highlands in the 18th and 19th centuries but has now been...

Deer

Deer   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... These animals were supposed by poets to shed tears. The drops, however, which fall from their eyes are not tears but an oily secretion from the so-called tear pits. A poor sequester’d stag … Did come to languish … and the big round tears Cours’d one another down his innocent nose In piteous chase. Deerstalker A soft cloth cap with peaks in front and behind and ear flaps that are often joined at the top. It is so called as traditionally worn by sportsmen stalking deer. It is popularly regarded as an essential part of the habiliment of Sherlock holmes , an...

Deer

Deer   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
359 words

... (ἔλαφος, νεβρός). Along with the gazelle and wild goat the deer was a popular object of hunting ; miniatures depict scenes of dogs or domesticated leopards in pursuit of deer. According to legend, Basil I was pursuing on horseback a huge stag that suddenly dragged the emperor from his saddle and carried him away on its antlers. Venison was recommended during cool seasons, but not in summer when it was considered poisonous. The horns of the deer were viewed as symbols of marital infidelity. Andronikos I reportedly exhibited antlers of the deer he had hunted,...

Deer

Deer   Reference library

The Encyclopedia of Mammals (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
8,925 words
Illustration(s):
8

...deer may move into towns, farms, and suburbs; thus, in North America, white-tailed deer have invaded cities to become a significant pest. Historically, the red deer was the royal deer of Europe, much esteemed for its sporting qualities throughout the ages. White-tailed and mule deer are currently the most important big game animals in North America, as the roe deer is in Europe. Some deer species tame easily. Reindeer were apparently the primary food source of our late-ice-age ancestors, and became a domesticated form postglacially, while red and Sika deer...

deer

deer   Quick reference

Mike Allaby

Dictionary Plus Science and Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Science and technology
Length:
113 words

... A browsing, ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae, typically with long, powerful legs and a compact body. Except in Chinese water deer, all males, and also female caribou, bear antlers used in competition for mates that grow and are shed annually; these are simple in some species but in most they are branched and in some species large and complex. Deer vary in size from the pudu, weighing about 9 kg, to the moose at 800 kg. There are 47 species found in forest, grassland, scrubland, and wetland habitats and native to the New World, Eurasia, and...

Red Deer

Red Deer (Alberta/Canada)   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Place Names (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020

...Red Deer , Alberta/Canada A city named after the river of the same name which itself was named by Scottish settlers who mistook the local elk for the red deer of Scotland. There is a lake called Red Deer Lake in...

deer stalking

deer stalking   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Agriculture and Land Management

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Social sciences
Length:
57 words

... stalking The hunting and shooting of deer , more commonly organized and let out on a commercial basis. Stalking can be an important part of the local rural economy and culture, particularly in parts of Scotland. It can also play a significant part of the management and control of deer populations. See also British Deer Society...

deer park

deer park   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
124 words

... park . It has been estimated that at least 1,900 deer parks were created in England alone during the Middle Ages. A few were recorded in the Domesday Book , but most were created during the 12th and 13th centuries. The fashion declined during the 15th and 16th centuries, but enjoyed a brief revival during the reign of Charles II . As deer were the property of the Crown, a lord was supposed to obtain a royal charter to empark. However, there are many well-documented parks for which no royal licence exists. The main types of deer which were kept in parks...

Deer Park

Deer Park   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
45 words

... Park . The Deer Park (Pāli, migadāya) at Isipatana near present-day Vārāṇasī was the site of the first sermon. After gaining enlightenment ( bodhi ) the Buddha came here and preached this sermon to five of his former ascetic companions, later known as the pañcavaggiyā monks...

deer-house

deer-house   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
31 words

...-house 1. As deercote . 2. Accommodation for a gamekeeper (e.g. the Gothick eye-catcher ( c. 1768) at Scampston Park, Ryedale, Yorks., possibly by Carr of York...

deer-park

deer-park   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
135 words

...-park 1. Enclosed park for keeping deer, examples of which were known in Anglo-Saxon times, and were used for hunting. Medieval examples were concerned with food production and sport, and were sometimes surrounded with ditches, having entrances called ‘deer-leaps’ by which the animals could enter but not leave. 2. Seen as a precursor to the landscape-park , and as a place of beauty in its own right, it was often transformed in C18, many examples being by ‘Capability’ Brown . American authors have treated it as a sub-category of the term park, as only a...

deer park

deer park   Reference library

Patrick Taylor

The Oxford Companion to the Garden

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... park . Enclosed royal hunting parks, or ‘forests’, governed by special laws go back to Anglo-Saxon England. The term forest has in this context no necessary connotation of trees. Oliver Rackham in his The History of the Countryside ( 1986 ) gives the legal definition of a forest as a ‘region in which the King (or other magnate) has the right to keep deer and make Forest Laws’. The ‘other magnate’ would refer to a great churchman or a powerful courtier. The Bishop of Durham, for example, had a deer park at Auckland Palace by the 13th century. The deer park...

deer park

deer park   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
657 words

... park It has been estimated that at least 1 900 deer parks were created in England alone during the Middle Ages, particularly in the midlands and the south, though they were not all in existence at the same time. A few were recorded in the Domesday Book , but most were created during the 12th and 13th centuries. See Robert Liddiard , ‘The Deer Parks of Domesday Book’, Landscapes , 4/1 (2003) , for a new interpretation of the evidence. The fashion declined during the 15th and 16th centuries, but enjoyed a brief revival during the reign of Charles II. As ...

Eight Deer

Eight Deer   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
892 words

...of the two men sacrificed by Lord 8 Deer. He formed an alliance with Lord 8 Deer's second wife, whose son had been set aside for the younger heir. Lord 8 Deer was led into an ambush, and Lord 4 Wind looked on as he was killed. Lord 8 Deer was fifty-two when he died. His nascent empire was divided between the eldest sons of his first and second wives. Several years later, Lord 4 Jaguar uncovered Lord 4 Wind's plot and pursued him. Because the political situation had already been severely unbalanced by Lord 8 Deer's death, we are told, the solar...

View: