You are looking at 1-16 of 16 entries  for:

  • All: coq au vin x
clear all

View:

coq au vin

coq au vin   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... au vin A casserole of chicken pieces cooked in red wine. The French term, which began to be used in English in the 1930s, means literally ‘cockerel with wine’, but nowadays the dish is almost always made with a standard (female) chicken. It is no doubt an age-old method employed by French country cooks to send off a venerable rooster that had outlived any other usefulness, but it was not ‘discovered’ and entered into the pantheon of French haute cuisine until the early years of the twentieth...

coq au vin

coq au vin noun phrase   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
15 words

... au vin noun phrase M20 French (literally, ‘cock in wine’). Chicken cooked in...

coq au vin

coq au vin noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
46 words
coq au vin

coq au vin noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
48 words
coq au vin

coq au vin noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
20 words
coq au vin

coq au vin noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
20 words
coq au vin

coq au vin noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
28 words
cock

cock   Reference library

Philip and Mary Hyman

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...many recipes just say ‘red wine’. The upsurge of interest in regional cuisines has recently brought to light other similar traditions for preparing Coq au vin. In Franche-Comté the bird is simmered in vin jaune ; and in Alsace in Riesling. In both these regions morels and cream are gladly added if available. Indeed, knowledgeable food experts no longer speak of Coq au vin in the singular but of coqs au vin in the plural, while acknowledging that these dishes were doubtless simmering away for long years before the first recipes were published and before the...

cooking with wine

cooking with wine   Reference library

Jancis Robinson and Martin Lam

The Oxford Companion to Wine (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...red wine and shallots; périgueux uses madeira, veal stock, and truffles; sauce Robert is white wine, onion, and mustard; and ravigote is made with white wine and vinegar. Stews and casseroles: wine, preferably from the same area as the dish, is an integral part of coq au vin , daube of beef, fish stew, boeuf bourguignonne , and many more classics of la cuisine bourgeoise . Acidic wine will detract rather than enhance. Jellies: poached foie gras set in a Gewurztraminer jelly is an Alsace speciality. Sweet jellies can be made from Sauternes or any...

French

French   Reference library

Alexandra Leaf

Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover’s Companion to New York City

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,399 words

...as a number of New York City bakers jumped on the “baguette bandwagon.” In 1975 , Les Trois Petits Cochons, the award-winning paté company, burst onto the downtown scene. Located on East Thirteenth Street, the charcuterie/takeout shop served such classics as boeuf bourgignon, coq au vin, blanquette de veau, quiche Lorraine, and crème caramel to Francophile New Yorkers. Culinary icon James Beard was a frequent customer and friend of the owners, Alain Sintourel and Jean-Pierre Paradié. Mimi Sheraton and Craig Claiborne were also enthusiastic fans, whose reviews...

harvest traditions

harvest traditions   Reference library

Rosi Hanson

The Oxford Companion to Wine (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,104 words

...cook only for their families and friends, but for one month they must turn themselves into restaurateurs of a special kind. Working in often rudimentary kitchens, they must feed demanding pickers both well and economically. Soups, rabbit dishes, and dishes such as pot-au-feu, coq au vin , and blanquettes are often requested by pickers nostalgic for an era when long, slow cooking was the norm. A harvest would not be a harvest in Burgundy without a bœuf bourguignon , for example, and in Bordeaux the bonfires of sarments , or vine shoots, on which are...

Italian American Food

Italian American Food   Reference library

Mark H. Zanger

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Julia Child, the revered “French Chef” of public television, describe shopping at Italian butchers and grocers. It helped that the electric blender and the newly introduced Cuisinart food processor made excellent pesto. But quite quickly no one was cooking Julia Child's lengthy coq au vin recipe, and everyone was making pasta with a new pasta machine, frothing cappuccino with another shining appliance, making gelato from cream with still another imported machine, stirring stock into risotto for an hour, pounding veal, and dreaming of Tuscan villas and Roman...

Cookbooks

Cookbooks   Reference library

Janice Bluestein Longone, Janice Bluestein Longone, Anne Mendelson, Becky Mercuri, Carol Mighton Haddix, Alice Ross, Anne L. Bower, Andrew F. Smith, Margaret Puskar-Pasewicz, and Virginia K. Bartlett

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...cooking with her precise instructions that taught Americans how to prepare French cuisine. The overriding message was that if Child could cook those dishes, so could others. On weekends American women headed to their kitchens and duplicated recipes for boeuf bourguignon and coq au vin, basking in praise for their efforts and enjoying themselves in the process. Child's television debut in 1963 clearly reinforced the fact that cooking could be fun. By the time her second book, The French Chef Cookbook , was released in 1968 , Americans had been converted...

Historical Overview

Historical Overview   Reference library

Andrew F. Smith, John U. Rees, Rachelle E. Friedman, John U. Rees, Alison Tozzi, Kara Newman, Anne Mendelson, Amy Bentley, Sylvia Lovegren, and Sylvia Lovegren

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Africa.” The most popular cuisine, or at least the one considered the most sophisticated, was French. French onion soup became a popular restaurant dish, usually garnished with a raft of toasted french bread sporting a load of melted Gruyère-type cheese. Duckling à l’orange, coq au vin, and boeuf bourguignon were three popular dishes, frequently made at home by ambitious cooks. Other cooks, a little less sure of themselves, might nevertheless perk up a familiar American beef stew with a slightly daring flick of garlic or an even more daring splash of wine....

Wit and Wordplay

Wit and Wordplay   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,558 words

...oscar wilde : How I wish I had said that. whistler : You will, Oscar, you will. James McNeill Whistler 1834 – 1903 American-born painter : in R. Ellman Oscar Wilde (1987) You will , Oscar, you will I thought coq au vin was love in a lorry. Victoria Wood 1953 – British writer and comedienne : Talent (1978) coq au vin was love love in a ...

Mexican American Food

Mexican American Food   Reference library

Jeffrey M. Pilcher

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...became an international fad and corporate chains began establishing overtly Tex-Mex restaurants throughout Europe and Japan. As a result of their travels, these already Americanized foods underwent further changes; in Paris, for example, chicken fajitas began to taste like coq au vin. Tex-Mex influences even spread to Mexico City in response both to tourist demands for familiar ethnic food and to Mexican travel to the United States. The archetypal example of this cultural clash came about around 1992 when Taco Bell opened an outlet in Mexico City. Fearing...

View: