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Overview

copyright

The legal ownership of the content and arrangement of a literary or artistic work (including computer software) in any medium, including the right to control its reproduction, normally at ...

Copyright

Copyright   Reference library

The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Legal History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law, History
Length:
19 words

... . For copyright in medieval and post-medieval Roman law, Southeast Asian law, and United States law, see Intellectual...

copyright

copyright   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
96 words

... Legal authority protecting works of art, literature, music and computer programs from reproduction or publication without the consent of the owner of the copyright. Since the Universal Copyright Convention ( 1952 ), works must carry the copyright symbol (©) followed by the owner's name and the first year of publication. Computer software and programs are protected in the US by the Copyright Act ( 1976 ) and Computer Software Act ( 1980 ), and in the UK by the Copyright (Computer Software) Amendment Act ( 1985 ). In the UK, the Copyright, Designs and...

copyright

copyright   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Journalism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
40 words

...copyright A property right that prevents the reproduction without permission of journalistic and other material. Copyright resides in the form in which information or ideas are presented rather than in the information or ideas themselves. Compare copyleft . See also plagiarism...

copyright

copyright   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemical Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...copyright The exclusive legal right to produce copies and to control a published literary work granted by law for a specified period. ...

copyright

copyright   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Business and Management (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
117 words

... The exclusive right to reproduce or authorize others to reproduce artistic, dramatic, literary, or musical works. It is conferred by the Copyright Act 1988 , which also extends to sound broadcasting, cinematograph films, television broadcasts, and computer programs. In EU countries copyright lasts for the author’s lifetime plus 70 years from the end of the year of death (or from the end of the year of publication, if later); it can be assigned or transmitted on death. The principal remedies for breach of copyright ( see piracy ) are an action for ...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Computer Science (7 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... The right to prevent copying. It is a negative right that can be exercised by a copyright holder both by means of civil proceedings and also by seeking a criminal prosecution. Copyright protects the form in which an idea is expressed but not the idea itself. It is the main legal protection for computer-based inventions. Under the WTO agreement all nations agreed to protect computer programs as literary works. Copyright law is now also used to limit the use that can be made of all digitally recorded information (programs, data, databases, etc.) to stop...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Publishing

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
133 words

...copyright Exclusive and assignable legal right, which is owned by the creator of any work (e.g. a novel, biography, textbook, drawing, or photograph). Copyright allows creators or owners to protect the economic rights and moral rights of their work. It is given for a fixed number of years to the creator depending on the copyright laws of their country. In Europe this is 70 years. Owners of copyright can license someone to publish it, authorize copying or reproduction, permit a broadcast or performance, and allow adaption of the work. Before work can be...

Copyright

Copyright   Reference library

Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
1,301 words

...some degree of copyright protection is available even without registration, and, in contrast to the case of patents, copyright registration is automatic; that is, government officials are not generally empowered to determine whether a work can or should be copyrighted. If a work incorporates some or all of a work copyrighted earlier by someone else, the author of the second work must obtain permission from the owner of the earlier work's copyright; otherwise, publication of the second work will violate, or “infringe,” the first author's copyright. (Permission...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
184 words

... The exclusive right to reproduce or authorize others to reproduce artistic, dramatic, literary, or musical works. It is conferred by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 , which also extends to sound broadcasting, cinematograph films, and television broadcasts (including cable television). Copyright lasts for the author's lifetime plus 70 years from the end of the year in which he died; it can be assigned or transmitted on death. EU Directive 93/98 requires all European Union member states to ensure that the duration of copyright is the life...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Economics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
54 words

...copyright The exclusive right to reproduce artistic, dramatic, literary, or musical work, or to authorize its reproduction by others. Copyright persists for a finite period after the author’s death; it can be sold or inherited. It also extends to films and television, and is one of the main forms of intellectual property rights...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Law (9 ed. )

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
198 words

...copyright n. The exclusive right to reproduce or authorize others to reproduce artistic, dramatic, literary, or musical works. It is conferred by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, which also extends to sound broadcasting, cinematograph films, and television broadcasts (including cable television). Copyright lasts for the author’s lifetime plus 70 years from the end of the year in which he died; it can be assigned or transmitted on death. EU directive 93/98 requires all EU states to ensure that the duration of copyright is the life of the author...

copyright

copyright   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
1,513 words

...people is unknown, then copyright in a film runs for seventy years from the making or release of a film, whichever is the later. Copyright in sound recordings lasts for fifty years from their making or release, whichever is later. Similarly, for broadcasts copyright lasts for fifty years from the first broadcast. Publishers' copyright in the typographical arrangements of published editions lasts for twenty‐five years from first publication. The protection of copyright is subject to two important limitations. One is that copyright is only protected to the...

copyright

copyright n. & vb.   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
283 words

...Walt (The Wizard) Williams was asked if he had the foresight to copywright [read copyright ] the moniker.” Bill Harris , “Raptors Watch,” Toronto Sun , 8  Dec. 1996 , Sports §, at 14. For a similar error, see playwriting . For copyright as an adjective, see copyrighted . Language-Change Index 1. ✳copywrite for copyright : Stage 1 Current ratio ( copyright vs. ✳copywrite ): 12,146:1 2. ✳copywright for copyright : Stage 1 Current ratio ( copyright vs. ✳copywright ):...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Media and Communication (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
72 words

... The legal ownership of the content and arrangement of a literary or artistic work (including computer software) in any medium, including the right to control its reproduction, normally at least initially that of its originator(s), for whom it is a form of intellectual property . Ideas as such are not subject to copyright. Copyright or the right to reproduce copies may subsequently be assigned by creators to others. Compare copyleft ; open content...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...copyright The legal protection conferred on inventions, creative works, intellectual property, etc., by official government agencies in many nations when an individual, group, organization, corporation, etc., declares the right to ownership of the copyright article. The legal protection is accompanied by the right to claim royalties when the copyright article is used by others. This can become contentious, for instance when an organization claims ownership of a naturally occurring article, such as an animal resulting from selective breeding (a laboratory...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Marketing (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
132 words

... The exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, and sell the matter and form of a literary, musical, or artistic work. Copyright laws were developed over the last century for the physical, controllable world; however, the world of the Internet with instant publication and vast distribution channel has challenged the existing copyright laws and the copyright owners’ ability to police and enforce them. An example of the new threat to old copyright processes was the huge popularity of the free music file-sharing Napster website and its major challenge...

copyright

copyright   Reference library

The Continuum Companion to Twentieth Century Theatre

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
538 words

... In Britain, the twentieth century saw the various constituents of the dramatic event gradually brought under copyright protection. The 1911 Copyright Act repealed all previous acts and instituted the modern understanding of ‘copyright’ as the ownership rights of the author to control legally the reproduction and distribution of his/her work. However, developments in film and television soon made this redundant and a further act was passed in 1956 , with an amendment in 1971 . The individual problems of designers, actors and technicians in...

copyright

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A Dictionary of Film Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
578 words

...structuring copyright (and intellectual rights more generally) within any particular deal, making entertainment law a lucrative peripheral business to the film industry ( see deal, the ). The copyright holder then has the right to distribute the film and benefit from any ancillary commercial opportunities such as DVD sales, television broadcast, and so on, for a set period of time. Generalizations regarding the duration of copyright protection are difficult to make due to constant changes in the law but a rough rule of thumb grants copyright on a film for...

Copyright

Copyright   Reference library

Craig Joyce

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Law
Length:
411 words

...Court's own Reporters of Decisions, held that copyright exists primarily to benefit the public rather than authors or assigns. At times, the Court has struggled when asked to extend copyright protection to new technologies, for example, piano rolls ( White‐Smith v. Apollo , 1908 ) and VCRs ( Sony v. Universal City Studios , 1984 ). The risk of failing to provide protection in such instances, observed Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes , Jr. (concurring in White‐Smith ), is that the result may accord copyright “less scope than its rational significance and...

copyright

copyright   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
329 words

...copyright The form of intellectual property by which monopoly rights are granted (under the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth)) to the creators of any literary or other creative works ( see artistic work ; work ), and subject matter other than works (in essence dividing the field into creative rights (in Part III, ss 31–83) and marketing rights (in Part IV, ss 84–113)). Copyright protects the expression of an idea in material form (not the idea itself). Unlike other forms of intellectual property, copyright does not require registration in Australia. It arises...

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