Update

You are looking at 1-20 of 63 entries  for:

  • All: cooking, loss of nutrients x
clear all

View:

Overview

cooking, loss of nutrients

In general, water-soluble vitamins and minerals are lost into the cooking water, the amount depending on the surface area to volume ratio, i.e. greater losses take place from finely cut or ...

cooking, loss of nutrients

cooking, loss of nutrients   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

..., loss of nutrients In general, water-soluble vitamins and minerals are lost into the cooking water, the amount depending on the surface area to volume ratio, i.e. greater losses take place from finely cut or minced foods. Fat-soluble vitamins are little affected except at frying temperatures. Proteins suffer reduction of available lysine when they are heated in the presence of reducing substances, and further loss under extreme conditions of temperature. Dry heat, as in baking, results in some loss of vitamin B 1 and available lysine. The most...

cooking, loss of nutrients

cooking, loss of nutrients  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In general, water-soluble vitamins and minerals are lost into the cooking water, the amount depending on the surface area to volume ratio, i.e. greater losses take place from finely cut or minced ...
steaming

steaming  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Method of cooking food in the steam above boiling water; there is less loss of nutrients into the cooking water than with boiling. Steaming is also carried out above 100 °C by means of pressure ...
frying

frying  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Cooking foods with oil at temperatures well above the boiling point of water. Deep frying, in which a food is completely immersed in oil, reaches a temperature around 185 °C. Nutrient losses are less ...
paper-bag cookery

paper-bag cookery   Reference library

Tom Jaine

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...had been first browned, though fish would not be, and the point of the wrapping was to steam the main item with aromatics and vegetables without loss of the juices. Paper bag cookery was more ambitious. Meat did not need preliminary browning: holes were punched in the bag to give colour to ‘roast’ beef or the bag enclosing a chicken was rent asunder at the end to impart a nice finish. It was claimed that cooking was more rapid and the oven need not be so hot; that there was no loss of nutrients; that it saved on washing-up and kitchen equipment; that the...

Invalid Cookery

Invalid Cookery   Reference library

Joseph M. Carlin

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...have problems eating or swallowing caused by loss of dentures or disease. Heavy solid foods were to be excluded and soft and mushy but nutrient-rich foods substituted. Recipes frequently included in this section were lemon-flavored barley water, milk toast, flaxseed tea, beef tea, milk punch, chicken broth, soft custards, panada (hot milk and butter over crackers soaked in boiling water), and tapioca pudding. Curiously, one of the most popular restoratives in New England was warm clam broth served with a dollop of whipped cream or finely pulverized cracker...

Slimming products

Slimming products   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...to regulate energy intake using ordinary food. They provide a controlled energy meal, ensuring a good range of essential nutrients. They remove the temptations involved in shopping for food and cooking meals, and as they are so different from the normal diet may serve to remind people that they are controlling their weight. The main drawback is that, if used inappropriately, low-calorie meal replacements may result in very rapid weight loss. Recommended energy intakes for weight-reducing programmes should be designed to allow the individual to lose...

haricot bean

haricot bean   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,327 words

...Soaking and cooking times vary widely, depending on the age and size of the beans. Some cooks add a pinch of bicarbonate of soda to the soaking water to render dried beans more digestible and to shorten cooking times. The latter aim is met, since the bicarbonate helps to dissolve the cell walls, a process which also speeds the exit of ‘the flatulating oligosaccharides’ (as the substances causing flatulence are known) from the beans. Unfortunately, however, loss of desirable nutrients also occurs. It is possible to suffer gastric upset from eating dried...

Cooking Techniques

Cooking Techniques   Reference library

Cathy K. Kaufman

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...O. “ Does Cooking Boost or Bust Nutrients in Vegetables? ” Fine Cooking 57 (April–May 2003): 26–27. Culinary Institute of America. The Professional Chef , 7th ed. New York: Wiley, 2002. Farmer, Fannie Merritt . The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book . Cambridge, Mass.: University Press, 1896. Henderson, Mary F. Housekeeper's Book . Philadelphia, Pa.: Marshall, 1837. Henderson, Mary F. Practical Cooking and Dinner Giving . New York: Harper, 1877. Kamman, Madeleine . The New Making of a Cook: The Art, Techniques, and Science of Good Cooking . New York:...

Vitamin, mineral, and trace element supplements

Vitamin, mineral, and trace element supplements   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...and in the production of haemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in blood), and is also important in the synthesis of several neurotransmitters. The requirement for vitamin B 6 is related to protein intake (in the UK the recommended nutrient intake for adults is 15 μg per gram of protein per day). Frank deficiency disease is rare, but if deficiency does occur (e.g. in alcoholics or through drug–nutrient interaction) a range of symptoms such as dermatitis, sore mouth, sore tongue, and angular stomatitis (cracks at the corner of the mouth) may occur. There...

Food and Diet

Food and Diet   Reference library

Harvey Levenstein

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of American Science, Medicine, and Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...and those robbed of nutrients by overprocessing. Veterans of the New Left, meanwhile, redirected their critique of capitalism toward its effects on food and the environment. The giant corporations, they charged, used their immense advertising resources to brainwash Americans into eating overprocessed, denutrified, unhealthful, and environmentally hazardous products. They pointed out, for example, that the spread of cattle ranching in South America to meet U.S. demands for beef was contributing directly to the destruction of the rain forests. Both...

Food and Diet.

Food and Diet.   Reference library

Harvey Levenstein

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,954 words

...enough nutrients. Neither the Depression of the 1930s nor World War II undermined confidence in America's abundant food supply. Indeed, the Depression-era agricultural crisis was defined as one of overproduction of food and maldistribution of income. And despite wartime rationing, many doubted that the shortages were real. Recurring rumors insisted food supplies were more than adequate, but that government incompetence or crooked middlemen were keeping them off the market. In the postwar “Baby Boom” years, 1946 to 1963 , the long-term tendency of food...

oats

oats   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...from Super-fine, which still has a granule. Rolled oats or Oatflakes were developed in America by the Quaker Oat Company in 1877 and are made by steaming and rolling pinhead oatmeal. While they have the obvious advantage of cooking more quickly than regular meal they have been specially heat treated with some loss of flavour and nutrients and this also applies to the other ‘instant’ oat porridges now on the market. Jumbo Oatflakes are made by steaming and rolling the whole oat. (adapted from Catherine Brown, 1985...

breakfast cereals

breakfast cereals   Reference library

Ralph Hancock

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
1,356 words

...only the food value of that grain, with slight losses of proteins and carbohydrates destroyed during cooking, and substantial losses of the rather frail B vitamins. In fact, in most countries, cereals are artificially ‘fortified’ with extra vitamins, as revealed in the small print on the packet ( see additives ). Cereals are usually eaten with milk, which provides nutrients which they lack (and with sugar, which provides nothing but calories). Bruce and Crawford have provided an entertaining and detailed chronicle of the whole process of Cerealizing America ...

Vegetables

Vegetables   Reference library

Kay Rentschler

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...and nutrient losses that vegetables sustain immediately upon harvesting increase their rate of respiration. When a vegetable is bruised or sliced—and, to a lesser degree, when it is harvested—it responds by using stored food reserves to repair the damage or by attempting to grow new cells. The loss of stored food reserves through respiration means a corresponding loss in nutrient value, flavor, moisture, and weight, and this precipitates the vegetable's overall deterioration. Temperature is the principal component in maintaining the quality of a vegetable...

Soybeans

Soybeans   Reference library

Peggy L. Holmes

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...the soybean plant supports colonies of microorganisms that live in root nodules. These specialized microorganisms are able to fix, or capture, nitrogen from the air, making the addition of nitrogen fertilizer unnecessary in a soybean field. A significant portion of this fixed nitrogen, which is an essential plant nutrient, remains in the soil after harvest. Most of the U.S. soybean crop is grown in the midwestern Corn Belt. The typical farmer will alternate soybeans with corn, taking advantage of the nitrogen contribution of the bean plant to help fertilize the...

Food and Diet

Food and Diet   Reference library

Harvey Levenstein

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Business, Labor, and Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management, Economics
Length:
2,063 words

...classes, heeding the call to choose foods on the basis of their “physiological economy” rather than on the basis of their taste, made culture heroes out of dietary faddists like John Harvey Kellogg, who amplified Graham's theories with purgative nostrums based on recent scientific discoveries that the colon harbored large amounts of bacteria. The “scientific cooking” advocate Fannie Farmer offered simple menus and exact recipes in her Boston Cooking-School Cook Book ( 1896 ). Women in the new profession of home economics, teaching in the schools about food and...

rice

rice   Reference library

Roger Owen and Roger Owen

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
3,299 words

...Eve, and delicacies such as the rice tart of Liège. Meanwhile, a third attitude to rice had developed in regions where it was grown as a food crop, played an important role in most people’s diet, but was not the only or a major staple food. In much of India, the Levant, the Middle East, and N. and W. Africa, rice became the basis of a huge range of savoury dishes, all of which may be regarded as variations on the pilaf . Whatever approach is taken to cooking rice, it will be a valuable source of nutrients (see box on ‘Rice in Nutrition’) and the...

Rations

Rations   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Australian Military History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...Forces Food Science Establishment ( AFFSE ), and in 1975 it came under the control of the Defence Science and Technology Organisation . Its main role is to determine the energy and nutrient requirements of service personnel and to translate these requirements into ration scales and packs. The ways in which it carries out this function include experimenting with new techniques of food manufacture; performing chemical, microbiological and other kinds of scientific analysis of food; conducting troop-feeding trials under combat conditions; and producing food...

Nutrition and Disease

Nutrition and Disease   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Evolution

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...of early hominid subsistence. The dietary shift that characterized early hominid adaptation, involved a decreased reliance on fruits and fruit-bearing trees and greater reliance on plants protected by hard coverings and with their nutrients stored underground. In this scenario, bipedal locomotion would have aided the transport of food, tools, and water between their sources and sites of preparation and consumption. Lessons from Contemporary Hunter-Gatherers The analysis of the dietary resources of the !Kung from Botswana provides a model for the behavior of...

View: