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Overview

consumer culture

See also advertising cultures; taste. 1. A pejorative reference to modern Western society in terms of its domination by the marketing and consumption of ...

consumer culture

consumer culture   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007

... culture A culture in which the marketing and consumption of goods and services has a dominant...

consumer culture

consumer culture   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
237 words

... culture A culture in which consumer goods are widely available to all, and in which increasing numbers of people work in order to acquire consumer goods that act as markers of the consumer's power in the marketplace and concomitantly as badges or markers of status. An advanced consumer culture combines the mass distribution of goods (very often manufactured in less affluent parts of the world) with the production of less widely distributed luxury. Sport, from the televising of events to the apparel of fans, contributes prominently to the profile of...

consumer culture

consumer culture   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Media and Communication (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
212 words

... culture ( consumer society , consumerization ) 1. A pejorative reference to modern Western society in terms of its domination by the marketing and consumption of goods and services ( see also promotional culture ). Anti-consumerists characterize its materialism as the reduction of personal fulfilment to consumption, criticize its superficiality, or see it in terms of cultural manipulation. See also aestheticization ; commercialism ; commercialization ; commodification ; commodity fetishism ; conspicuous consumption ; Frankfurt...

Consumer Culture.

Consumer Culture.   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
825 words

... Culture. The term “consumer culture” refers to cultures in which mass consumption and production both fuel the economy and shape perceptions, values, desires, and constructions of personal identity. Economic developments, demographic trends, and new technologies profoundly influence the scope and scale of consumer culture. Social class , gender , ethnicity, region, and age all affect definitions of consumer identity and attitudes about the legitimacy of consumer-centered lifestyles. The intellectual roots of consumer culture date to seventeenth-century...

Consumer Culture

Consumer Culture   Reference library

David Herzberg

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... Culture The term “consumer culture” refers to societies in which the widespread consumption and production of goods is a central element of economic organization and also shapes cultural formations such as daily interactions, desires, values, and constructions of personal identity. Consumer Revolutions, 1607–1865. The earliest signs of such cultures emerged during Britain's “consumer revolution” in the eighteenth century, when increasing prosperity fostered demand for manufactured goods such as clothing, tableware, beer, tea, vases, razor strops, jigsaw...

Consumer Culture

Consumer Culture   Reference library

David Herzberg

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Business, Labor, and Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management, Economics
Length:
2,988 words

... Culture The term “consumer culture” refers to societies in which the widespread consumption and production of goods is a central element of economic organization. The earliest signs of such cultures emerged during Britain's so-called consumer revolution in the eighteenth century, when increasing prosperity fostered demand for goods such as clothing, tableware, beer, tea, sugar, vases, razor strops, and more. Growing demand, in turn, spurred innovations in production and new techniques for marketing, including retail stores, advertisers, and more...

consumer culture

consumer culture  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
See also advertising cultures; taste.1. A pejorative reference to modern Western society in terms of its domination by the marketing and consumption of goods and services (see also promotional ...
Consumerism

Consumerism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,809 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...J. H. , The Commercialization of Leisure in Eighteenth-Century England , Reading, 1973; Georgian Delights , London, 1980; Shammas, C. , The Pre-Industrial Consumer in England and America , Oxford, 1990; Weatherill, L. , Consumer Behaviour and Material Culture 1660–1760 , London, 1988. Roy...

Sensibility

Sensibility   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,039 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...culture and changing constructions of masculinity mean to women? Roy Porter and Carole Shammas note some significant changes that had taken place in women's work with the beginnings of *consumerism [19] . Central to the purpose of the culture of sensibility was the aggrandizement of the affectionate family and, at its heart, mothering, because it could legitimate traits desired by the middle class, including consumer desire [ see *domesticity, 13 ]. Recent scholarship suggests that the increasing comfort of domestic space afforded by consumer...

Noun Plague

Noun Plague   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
430 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of nouns to modify other nouns ( MAU at 229). When a sentence has more than two nouns in a row, it generally becomes much less readable. The following sentence is badly constructed because of the noun-upon-noun syndrome, which (sadly) is more common now than in Follett's day: “Consumers complained to their congressmen about the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's automobile seat belt ‘interlock’ rule .” One can hardly make it to the sentence end to discover that we’re talking about a rule. (Even worse, many writers today would leave off the...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Quick reference

Charles Phythian-Adams

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,654 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...mass culture of today from the small‐scale, participatory, provincial cultures of yesteryear. It is loud music that continues to link the new with the old. See J. M. Golby and A. W. Purdue , The Civilisation of the Crowd: Popular Culture in England 1750–1900 (1984) , Tim Harris (ed.), Popular Culture in England, c.1500–1850 (1995) , Barry Reay , Popular Cultures in England, 1500–1750 (1998) , Alexander Fenton , The Shape of the Past: Essays in Scottish Ethnology (2 vols, 1986 ), and David Underdown , Start of Play: Cricket and Culture in...

Plain Language

Plain Language   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
1,284 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...). • Rudolf Flesch , The Art of Plain Talk ( 1951 ; repr. 1978 ). • Robert Gunning , The Technique of Clear Writing (rev. ed. 1968 ). • Rudolf Flesch , How to Write Plain English: A Book for Lawyers and Consumers ( 1979 ). • How Plain English Works for Business: Twelve Case Studies (U.S. Dep't of Commerce, Office of Consumer Affairs, 1984 ). • Ernest Gowers , The Complete Plain Words ( Sidney Greenbaum & Janet Whitcut eds., 3d ed. 1986 ). • Robert D. Eagleson , Writing in Plain English ( 1990 ). • Plain Language: Principles...

Prose

Prose   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,185 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and influence in the 1820s, doing much to make the taste for what was only later to be called ‘Romanticism’. John Wilson's essays and reviews for Blackwood's established that magazine's early predisposition to shape an audience of middle-class culture consumers. Indeed, the new figure of the intellectual consumer was made plausible by the impressive leap in circulation figures for the major reviews and magazines by 1820 : while early issues of the Edinburgh and Quarterly reviews still had circulations of 3,000–4,000, like their precursors, the numbers...

Popular Culture

Popular Culture   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,520 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...cultures widened into a yawning gulf; second, that over this same period the British middle and ruling classes subjected the culture of the common people to intensifying attack in order to eradicate or reform traditional customs and morality. Popular culture, they have argued, thus became increasingly oppositional and embattled, the domain of the labouring poor and outcast. This process of marginalization was compounded by the modernizing forces of commercialism and *consumerism [19] . Such unanimity of interpretation is strongly based: narratives of...

Medicine

Medicine   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,985 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...a function of growing disposable incomes amongst a swelling sector of the British population. A consumer boom was in progress, and increased surplus income was going into all manner of goods and services, pleasures and household goods. The purchase of medical services was one manifestation of the growing prosperity of what has been called an early consumer society. The distinctive cultural formation of *spa towns operated precisely at this nexus of *consumerism [19] and medicalization. Historians of eighteenth-century medicine used to present a picture of...

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,935 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by passion and knowledge the vast empire of human society, as it is spread over the whole earth, and over all time. The confidence manifest here is to some extent offset by the sense of crisis that pervades the Preface. Politics, modernity, and the emergence of a consumer society [ see *consumerism, 19 ] all conspire to ‘blunt the discriminating powers of the mind’ and produce a ‘degrading thirst after outrageous stimulation’. With these forces arrayed against him, Wordsworth is saved from melancholy only because he has a ‘deep impression of certain inherent...

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...who could not read lived to an unprecedented degree in a culture of print, for the impact of the publishing revolution extended beyond the literate public. People who could not read were encouraged to buy a few books so that their literate guests and friends could read to them. Reading aloud, both in public and in private, was a universal practice that enabled non-readers to share in the pleasures of the literate. In homes, taverns, *coffeehouses , in fields, and on the street, oral and literate cultures were married through the ministrations of the public...

Music

Music   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,344 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... J. R. Planché ( 1796–1880 ). However, while the British may have created little music of lasting distinction outside the piano repertoire, their activities as consumers were universally acclaimed as prodigious. Music in late-eighteenth-century Britain is commonly thought to have been in rapid transition from aristocratic patronage to bourgeois consumption, in line with general trends in *consumerism [19] . Yet such assumptions generally lack a necessary foundation of historical research; they rest upon supposition about repertoire (what was performed?),...

Design

Design   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,178 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...plate workshop, first in Greenwich and after 1807 in Soho, which supplied them with their stock and work on commission. But the largest manufacturers to exploit the neoclassical taste lay outside London, where production could be undertaken on an industrial scale [ see *consumerism, 19 ]. In the early 1760s Matthew *Boulton built his Soho factory at Handsworth, Birmingham, and with his partner John Fothergill redeemed the poor reputation of Birmingham goods by producing ‘toys’ in iron, brass, and silver plate—buckles, buttons, watch-chains, jewellery...

Domesticity

Domesticity   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,930 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by commodities such as tasteful furnishings, fashionable clothing [ see *fashion ], a musical instrument—either harpsichord or piano, which were primary instruments of domestic *music . Here domesticity is linked to consumer desire, emphasizing the domestic interior as a site of conspicuous cultural and material consumption [ see *consumerism, 19 ]. A growing fascination with all aspects of the home—including, for example, how many rooms were appropriate for how many children, for their physical and mental well-being—underpinned the idea of the family as a...

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