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Overview

common-law marriage

Subject: Law

1 A marriage recognized as valid at common law although not complying with the usual requirements for marriage. Such marriages are only recognized today if (1) they are ...

common law marriage

common law marriage   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
252 words

... law marriage The term ‘common law marriage’ bears multiple meanings and has been the subject of much misunderstanding. Many modern cohabitants mistakenly believe that by living together they have a ‘common law marriage’ that gives them the same rights as if they were legally married. The term is also used in a historical context to refer to marriages celebrated according to the canon law that governed marriage prior to the Clandestine Marriages Act of 1753 , and also to marriages celebrated overseas under circumstances in which compliance with the local...

common-law marriage

common-law marriage   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
152 words

...-law marriage 1. A marriage recognized as valid at common law although not complying with the usual requirements for marriage. Such marriages are only recognized today if (1) they are celebrated outside England and there is no local form of marriage reasonably available to the parties or (2) they are celebrated by military chaplains in a foreign territory (or on a ship in foreign waters), and one of the parties to the marriage is serving in the Forces in that territory. The form of marriage is a declaration that the parties take each other as married...

common‐law marriage

common‐law marriage   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
133 words

...‐law marriage 1 A marriage recognized as valid at common law although not complying with the usual requirements for marriage. Such marriages are only recognized today if (1) they are celebrated outside England and there is no local form of marriage reasonably available to the parties or (2) they are celebrated by military chaplains in a foreign territory (or on a ship in foreign waters), and one of the parties to the marriage is serving in the Forces in that territory. The form of marriage is a declaration that the parties take each other as husband and...

common-law marriage

common-law marriage   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
160 words

...-law marriage has one meaning in AmE and another in BrE. In American law, the phrase generally denotes an agreement to be married, followed by cohabitation and a public recognition of the marriage. Common-law marriages are valid in many states, such as Texas, though others have abolished the institution, as New York did in 1932 . In England, common-law marriage now refers only to a marriage celebrated according to a common-law form in a place where the local forms of marriage cannot be used (e.g., a desert island) or are morally unacceptable to the...

common-law marriage

common-law marriage n   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Italian Dictionary: English-Italian (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
7 words
common-law marriage

common-law marriage  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
1 A marriage recognized as valid at common law although not complying with the usual requirements for marriage. Such marriages are only recognized today if (1) they are celebrated outside England and ...
Law

Law   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,210 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...contemptuous of the common law. Yet the resilience of common law attitudes inhibited the growth of central government until the second half of the nineteenth century. Ultimately, common law loyalties were only overturned by the imperatives of the new society, rather than by the criticisms of the Benthamites. The clearest examples of early legislative assertiveness at the expense of common law tradition and practice—a process which was substantially under way by the 1830s—may be seen in the new administrative bodies created by the Poor Law Amendment Act and...

Family and Society

Family and Society   Quick reference

Ralph Houlbrooke

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,144 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...valid marriage. In practice, the nobility tended to arrange marriages for their heirs when they were still young. Property holders generally expected that their children would, in return for any material help given, take their views into account before choosing a partner. Yet young people in the middle and lower ranks of society had some freedom in courtship. The Church, while accepting that a couple could marry by means of a spoken contract without its blessing, strongly discouraged the consummation of such marriages before the service. The common law,...

Chronology of a Struggle for Equal Rights

Chronology of a Struggle for Equal Rights   Reference library

Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
2,423 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the Quran advocates monogamy as the original and ideal state of marriage in Islam. Malaysia in the late 1970s and early 1980s embarked upon a remarkable programme of reformation of Islamic family laws under the doctrine of siasah syariah (in codification of the law, the state may choose opinions of differing schools to serve the best interest of the community), which introduced among others the restriction of polygamy to help ensure that justice is done as envisaged by the Quran. The reform law laid down a set of conditions upon which it sought to assess...

The Modernist Majority Report

The Modernist Majority Report   Reference library

Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,627 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to it, with the warning that the common man will find it extremely difficult, if not impos-sible, to fulfill the conditions of equal justice attached to it. The members of the Commission, therefore, are convinced that the practice cannot be left to the sweet will of the individual. It is thoroughly irrational to allow individuals to enter into second marriages whenever they please and then demand post facto that if they are unjust to the first wife and children, the wife and children should seek a remedy in a court of law. This is like allowing a...

The Reinterpretation of Islam

The Reinterpretation of Islam   Reference library

Āsaf A. A. Fyzee

Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,156 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Africa, French jurisprudence; in Central Asia, the Soviet laws; in India, the English common law; in Indonesia, the Dutch law and above all, International law, are profoundly influencing not only the body of law but the meaning of justice as it affects the Muslims. We have seen that the Sharī‘a is both law and religion. Law is by its very nature subject to change. The heart of religion, on the other hand, is unchangeable, or at any rate, the belief in God is an unalterable ideal, a perennial quest. If two such divergent forces are made to live together,...

Islam and the Malay Civilizational Identity: Tension and Harmony Between Ethnicity and Religiosity

Islam and the Malay Civilizational Identity: Tension and Harmony Between Ethnicity and Religiosity   Reference library

Bakar Osman

Islam in Transition: Muslim Perspectives (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,678 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...in accordance with its revealed laws collectively termed the Shari’ah. The beginning of Islam as a civilization may be identified with the founding of the first Muslim community in Medina following the Prophet's hijrah to the city from Mecca. In Medina laws for the new community had been revealed in stages. The Prophet had also established a socio-political order with clear guidelines for inter-faith living and cooperation for the city-state's different religious communities who as fellow citizens were to have common rights and responsibilities. It was...

Domesticity

Domesticity   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,930 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of women. Companionate marriage could work to subordinate women because it further legitimized male supremacy by claiming that the interests of the family were totally united, and because it underwrote the stricter separation of women's spheres from the outside world, thereby reinforcing characterizations of women as creatures of sentiment rather than as rational citizens. This ideological belief is expressed in the common law doctrine of ‘coverture’, by which the wife's legal identity was subsumed under that of her husband [ see *law, 8 ]. As Carole...

Shari‘a and Basic Human Rights Concerns

Shari‘a and Basic Human Rights Concerns   Reference library

‘Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na‘im

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
12,922 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...requires complete equality between men and women in all matters relating to marriage and family relations during the marriage and upon its dissolution, Egypt's reservation states that its obligations “must be without prejudice to the Islamic shari‘a provisions.” In this way, it can be said that Egypt is aware of the conflict between the international obligation established by that article and its own shari‘a personal law for Muslims. As long as this is the only aspect of Egyptian law based on shari‘a which is inconsistent with Egypt's obligation under this...

Ruth

Ruth   Reference library

Grace I. Emmerson and Grace I. Emmerson

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
4,704 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...law, ‘Go back’, is repeated in vv. 11–12 in a more peremptory way. The expression ‘mother's house’ is to be noted. It occurs elsewhere in contexts of love and marriage ( cf. Gen 24:28; Song 3:4; 8:2 ). In general, however, a widow returned to her father's house ( Gen 38:11; Lev 22:13 ), but the death of Ruth's father is not implied ( cf. 2:11 ). Naomi's horizons are restricted to the idea that ‘security’ ( v. 9 ) is to be found only in marriage, a thought which continues through vv. 11–13 . It is debatable whether or not the idea of levirate marriage...

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,753 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the Exchequer of Pleas, Common Pleas, and King's Bench, used writs, Common Pleas and King's Bench developing out of the undifferentiated Curia Regis after 1234 . The Exchequer of Pleas was used to bring actions against crown officials, including sheriffs , and while its jurisdiction was widened by the fiction of allowing suits from crown debtors, it was never a busy jurisdiction. Common Pleas was the busiest court, having in the late 15th century between 70 and 80 per cent of the total common law business ( E. W. Ives , The Common Lawyers of...

Shari‘a: The Codification of Islamic Law

Sharia: The Codification of Islamic Law   Reference library

Muhammad Sa‘id Al-‘Ashmawi

Liberal Islam: A Sourcebook

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,146 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...touch with worldly affairs.” Does Egyptian common law, aside from some exceptions, propose anything other than the installation of justice in society? Does not the action of the Egyptian judiciary, developed by serious and persevering work, seek to establish justice, law and security? If there is still someone who, after all that, could pretend that Egyptian courts and laws impede shari‘a and the government of Divine Revelation, we would refer to what we have said...

Women

Women   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,844 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of women as rational and educable, and the importance of education as a basis of prudent and successful marriage and wise motherhood, were, moreover, the subjects of much late-eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century fiction. Several of the novels of Jane *Austen , as well as Susan *Ferrier 's Marriage ( 1818 ), stress the connection between rational education and the training and control of feeling; they contrast education and wise marriage on the one hand with ignorance, frivolity, and destructive imprudence on the other. While Wollstonecraft's...

South Asian Genealogy

South Asian Genealogy   Quick reference

Abi Husainy

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
3,254 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Muslims need to register their marriages with the Nikka Registrar, who receives an appointment from the municipality, Panchayat committee, and cantonment board or union council. The marriage certificate, known as the Nikka Nama, is written in Urdu, though a translation authenticated for accuracy may accompany the document. For non‐Muslims, including Christians, Hindus, and Parsees, it is usually the case that church or temple leaders must register a marriage with local authorities. If non‐Muslims desire to make their marriage part of the civil record, they...

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