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Overview

cohabitation

Subject: Law

Living together under one roof in a marital, de facto marital, or marriage-like relationship in the absence of a formal marriage, whether the partners are heterosexual or homosexual. See ...

cohabitation

cohabitation   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Sociology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Social sciences, Sociology
Length:
60 words

... An arrangement whereby couples who are not legally married live together as husband and wife. Frequent in previous eras, cohabitation has increased markedly in the United States and Britain since the 1960s. It is now common before marriage and is often an alternative to marriage. Cohabitation has become so widespread that the term itself is now rarely...

cohabitation

cohabitation   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
780 words

... ‘Cohabitation’ has become the accepted term used in family law to refer to couples in intimate relationships who are living together in the same household but are not formally married or, in the case of same‐sex couples, have not registered a civil partnership in accordance with the Civil Partnership Act 2004 . Whilst in England and Wales, legal recognition for informal ‘common law marriage’ was abolished by the Clandestine Marriages Act 1753 , Scotland, in contrast, retained a form of common law marriage known as marriage by cohabitation...

cohabitation

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A Dictionary of Social Work and Social Care (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Living together without being married - can be used with overtones of moral disapproval. The phenomenon is now so widespread that the term has almost fallen out of use, except for in the social security system in relation to means-testing . Here a couple is considered to be two people aged over 16 who are married or in a civil partnership and living in the same household or, if not married or in a civil partnership, ‘living together as if husband and wife or as if in a civil partnership’. The latter is usually referred to as the ‘cohabitation...

cohabitation

cohabitation   Quick reference

Ian Campbell

A Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics and International Relations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
142 words

... French term for cooperation between parties without forming a coalition. This situation arises whenever the presidency and the legislature are controlled by different parties, for instance in 1986 , when a President of the left, François Mitterrand, was confronted by a government of the right under Jacques Chirac . This represented a major test for the hybrid Fifth Republic whose constitution allocates powers and responsibilities in a vague and sometimes contradictory manner between President, prime minister, and government. Cohabitation is...

cohabitation

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A Dictionary of Contemporary World History (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
History, Contemporary History (post 1945)
Length:
177 words

...cohabitation (‘ coexistence ’) ( France ) A term denoting the coincidence in France of a president from one party and a prime minister from another. Under the Constitution of the Fifth Republic , the president had a strong role and could determine the contours of government policy. This became difficult in the 1970s, when under Giscard d'Estaing and Chirac the president and his prime minister came from two different, but still right‐wing, parties. It became even more problematic during the 1980s and 1990s, when president and prime minister came from...

cohabitation

cohabitation   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
33 words

...cohabitation Living together under one roof in a marital, de facto marital, or marriage-like relationship in the absence of a formal marriage , whether the partners are heterosexual or homosexual. See also divorce ; family ....

cohabitation rule

cohabitation rule   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
254 words

... rule In the schemes relating to some social security benefits a distinction is made between couples and single people. A couple for this purpose comprises two persons who are either married to each other or are ‘living together as husband and wife’ (the cohabitation rule). The quoted phrase is not defined in legislation but has been judicially interpreted. The courts and the Social Security Commissioners have confirmed that the factors that are relevant to this status include: membership of the same household; permanency of the relationship; shared...

cohabitation

cohabitation noun   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
102 words

... noun LME French . 1 LME Living together; community of life. archaic. 2 M16 Living together as husband and wife, especially without legal marriage. 3 Politics L20 An alliance dictated by expediency between office-holders of differing political views (originally in France). Fully naturalized in senses 1 and 2, the word in its general literal meaning, as used in Middle English, is now almost entirely superseded by the particular sense 2. As a recent introduction from the French political scene, sense 3 is often written in italics to differentiate...

cohabitation

cohabitation f   Reference library

Oxford Business French Dictionary: French-English

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
4 words
cohabitation

cohabitation nf   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford-Hachette French Dictionary: French-English (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
20 words
cohabitation

cohabitation noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
86 words
cohabitation

cohabitation noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
90 words
cohabitation

cohabitation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Living together under one roof in a marital, de facto marital, or marriage-like relationship in the absence of a formal marriage, whether the partners are heterosexual or homosexual. See also ...
cohabitation

cohabitation  

French term for cooperation between parties without forming a coalition. This situation arises whenever the presidency and the legislature are controlled by different parties, for instance in 1986, ...
cohabitative

cohabitative   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... ; ✳cohabitive . The first, long the prevailing form, is morphologically superior. The general rule is that in Latinate nouns of this type, the adjectival form derives from the noun form. Hence cohabitative follows from the noun cohabitation . Cf. interpretative . Current ratio:...

cohabit

cohabit   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
122 words

... , the verb for cohabitation , is analogous to inhabit —e.g.: “To cohabit is to dwell together,” says one treatise, “so that matrimonial cohabitation is the living together of a man and woman ostensibly as husband and wife.” Joel P. Bishop , Marriage, Divorce, and Separation § 1669 , at 694 ( 1891 ). ✳Cohabitate is a misbegotten back-formation that has never seriously competed with cohabit in print sources. It appears only sporadically in edited English—e.g.: “There's little evidence that tax rates are pushing people to cohabitate [read ...

cohabitation rule

cohabitation rule  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
In the schemes relating to some social security benefits a distinction is made between couples and single people. A couple for this purpose comprises two persons who are either married ...
cohabit

cohabit   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
16 words

... XVI. — late L. cohabitāre . So cohabitation XV. Cf. (O)F. cohabiter , -ation , and see CO- , HABITATION...

cohabit

cohabit   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... , the verb for cohabitation , is analogous to inhabit —e.g.: “To cohabit is to dwell together,” says one treatise, “so that matrimonial cohabitation is the living together of a man and woman ostensibly as husband and wife” ( Joel P. Bishop , Marriage, Divorce, and Separation , 1891 ). Cohabitate is a misbegotten back-formation —e.g.: “There's little evidence that tax rates are pushing people to cohabitate [read cohabit ] rather than marry (most cohabitating [read cohabiting ] relationships end within two years)” ( Wash. Post...

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