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clerks of the Justices

Subject: Law

Each Supreme Court justice may have a staff of four law clerks. Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justice John Paul Stevens, however, chose to employ only three each. The justices ... ...

clerks of the Justices

clerks of the Justices   Reference library

The Oxford Guide to the United States Government

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics
Length:
227 words

...H. Rehnquist , who clerked for Robert H. Jackson ; John Paul Stevens, who clerked for Wiley B. Rutledge ; and Byron White , who clerked for Fred M. Vinson . The law clerks provide valuable research assistance for the justices. They also read, analyze, and write summaries of certiorari petitions, the requests to the Court for review of cases. The justices often depend upon their clerks’ summaries and recommendations in deciding which cases to select for review. Justice Horace Gray was the first member of the Court to employ a law clerk. In 1885 Gray...

Clerks of the Justices

Clerks of the Justices   Reference library

Martha Swann

The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Law
Length:
1,012 words

...for review, justices often rely on their clerks' summaries and recommendations. During the spring, after the Court has reached its decisions, clerks assist the justices in the preparation of written opinions. In spite of the valuable assistance law clerks render the Court, their actions have not escaped criticism. The annual turnover of clerks leads to a lack of institutional memory at the Court. Chief Justice Burger created the Office of Legal Counsel in 1973 to provide a measure of continuity for both the chief justice and the Court that the...

clerks of the Justices

clerks of the Justices  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Each Supreme Court justice may have a staff of four law clerks. Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justice John Paul Stevens, however, chose to employ only three each. The justices ...
Local Government

Local Government   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,202 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...problems of its own) must be seen in terms of the evolution of the power and authority of the JPs. They were crown appointees named to a panel, the Commission of the Peace, for each county. By 1603 some 71 Commissions were issued, 55 for English and Welsh counties (Wales receiving Commissions only when shired in 1543 ), nine for liberties , and seven for boroughs . A number of towns were exempt from the county Commissions, and were governed by their mayor and aldermen sitting ex officio as justices. Each Commission was supported by a clerk of the peace....

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,753 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...was concerned with the facts, equity much more about reconciling the parties. These distinctions divide the first generation of common law courts from those which followed. The writ was a licence which allowed the plaintiff to sue for a certain kind of justice. The early writs were flexible in that the clerks who drafted them could tailor them to the plaintiff's circumstances, but by the mid‐13th century the range of writs, and their wording, was settled by precedent. The litigant therefore had to discover which writ (out of the precedent writs available)...

The Twentieth Century

The Twentieth Century   Quick reference

Brian M. Short

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,083 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...whether under the aegis of the local authority or outside it as a privately funded school, still remain with the school itself. Some, as with Lancing College, Sussex—one of the Woodard group—have their own archivist, in the same way that chartered livery companies such as the Mercers’ Company, or hospitals such as the Royal London, also have their own archivists. Closure dates relating to individual pupils may vary; that for Eton College, for example, is currently 40 years. Local authority records should also include those of the clerk's department, which...

Britain and America: A Common Heritage

Britain and America: A Common Heritage   Quick reference

George Redmonds

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,879 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to the American Colonies, 1773–1776 ( 1988 ), a mine of information on the people who left for America in the three years before the Revolutionary war. Most departures were on named ships from the Port of London, but there are lists also for Bristol, Hull, Liverpool, and several smaller ports. In July 1775 , for example, 77 emigrants embarked on the Fortune in London. They were from every part of Britain and included Thomas Hudleston of Norwich, a bricklayer aged 18, Thomas Adamson of Scotland, a tanner aged 21, Michael Murphy of Cork, a clerk aged...

The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,171 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...weigh the competing claims of religion and civil society, justice and mercy, marriage and friendship. Shylock, the first of the mature comedies’ great antagonists, owes some of his enduring impact not only to his formal status as the comedy’s tragic scapegoat and his religious status as an embodiment of Judaic law in a Christian community nominally committed to love and mercy, but to the skill with which Shakespeare invests his comparatively short role with its own distinctive voice. Critical history: Responses to this play have for most of its history...

48 The History of the Book in America

48 The History of the Book in America   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
12,975 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...subject, the stock was shelved behind the counter, with sales clerks serving and advising readers. As Americans embraced the pleasures of reading many books just once (what scholars have termed ‘extensive reading’) alongside the familiar custom of studying the same ones (such as the Bible) again and again (‘intensive reading’), the collective ownership of books remained an attractive alternative to individual purchase. Social libraries—voluntary associations founded by members’ purchase of shares—blossomed after the Revolution, flourishing until the 1830s ....

lord justice clerk

lord justice clerk  

Scottish legal post. Originally the lord justice clerk of Scotland was clerk and assessor to the Justiciar's Court. The court, usually presided over by peers, had professional lawyers as clerks. ...
clerk of courts

clerk of courts  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A registrar of a Local Court (Magistrates' Court) in some jurisdictions: e.g. Justices Act (NT) s 42; Justices Act 1886 (Qld) s 22C. The clerk is the court official responsible ...
clerk to the justices

clerk to the justices  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A person who has a five-year magistrates' court qualification, or a barrister or solicitor of not less than five years' standing as an assistant to a magistrates' clerk, who is appointed to assist ...
Early Administrative Hearing

Early Administrative Hearing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(EAH)The first hearing in the magistrates' court of a case triable only on indictment that must be sent. to the Crown Court for trial (see sending offences for trial), or any other case in which a ...
lord justice-general

lord justice-general  

Scottish legal post. From the 15th cent. the lord justice‐general was recognized as the supreme judge of criminal cases in Scotland, superseding the post of justiciar. In 1830 the Court of Session ...
staff of the Supreme Court, nonjudicial

staff of the Supreme Court, nonjudicial  

Reference type:
Overview Page
More than 319 permanent staff members assist the justices in carrying out the business of the U.S. Supreme Court. Most of these employees of the Court work for one of ...
certified extract

certified extract  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
An extract from the register of a magistrates' court, authenticated by the court or clerk to the justices, which can be used to establish a conviction, acquittal, order of the court, etc.
Cert Pool

Cert Pool  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
With thousands of petitions for writs of certiorari to consider each term, the Supreme Court justices have long relied on their law clerks' help to identify “certworthy” cases. Beginning in ...
Budget of the Court

Budget of the Court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
When the Supreme Court first met in February 1790, it placed negligible burdens on the federal budget. There were only six justices earning salaries of $4,000 for the chief justice ...
Bureaucratization of the Court

Bureaucratization of the Court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The Supreme Court consists of nine jurists who, at least in theory, after meaningful collegial deliberation interpret the Constitution based on their individual philosophies, wisdom, and legal ...
Staff of the Court, Nonjudicial

Staff of the Court, Nonjudicial  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The staff of the United States Supreme Court has traditionally been long tenured, low profile, and reliable in supporting the chief justice and associate justices. Employees have fed upon, and ...

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