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Overview

chancellor

Subject: History

In the C of E, the diocesan chancellor is a professional lawyer who is the chief representative of the bishop in the administration of the temporal affairs of his diocese. Diocesan ...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
8 words

... . An administrative officer in a Christian...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
57 words

... . An official secretary, e.g. of the chapter of a cathedral. The Chancellor of England (Lord Chancellor or Lord High Chancellor) became the highest officer in medieval England; he presides over the House of Lords and remains a member of the Cabinet and the highest judicial officer. The Chancellor of the Exchequer became the highest finance...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
57 words

... An official secretary, e.g. of the chapter of a cathedral . The Chancellor of England (Lord Chancellor or Lord High Chancellor) became the highest officer in medieval England; he presides over the House of Lords and remains a member of the Cabinet and the highest judicial officer. The Chancellor of the Exchequer became the highest finance...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Wine (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2023

... , productive but minor red french hybrid developed from two seibel parents. It was long known as Seibel 7053 but was named Chancellor in new york in 1970 . Encountered occasionally in the...

chancellor

chancellor   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
163 words

... . In the C of E, the diocesan chancellor is a professional lawyer who is the chief representative of the bishop in the administration of the temporal affairs of the diocese. Diocesan chancellors are usually the sole presidents of the Consistory Courts in faculty cases . They deal with applications for faculties and, through their surrogates , common marriage licences . With two clerical and two lay assessors as jury, they hear complaints against clerics under the Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction Measure 1963 , as amended, when these do not involve...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...In France the chancellor was the royal notary, president of the councils and keeper of the Great Seal. Bismarck was made chancellor of the newly created German Empire in 1871 , and the title is still that of the head of the government (corresponding to the British prime minister ) in some European countries, notably Austria and Germany. There are also diocesan chancellors who preside over the bishop’s court, chancellors of cathedrals, academic chancellors who are usually the titular heads of universities, and other posts of this title. Chancellor of the Duchy...

chancellor

chancellor   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
243 words

...the chancellor is one of the four principal dignitaries, dean, precentor, chancellor, and treasurer. He used to be responsible for the cathedral school and also the library. In modern times he is often assigned wider educational functions. E. G. Moore , Introduction to English Canon Law (3rd edn by T. Briden and B. Hanson , 1992), 115–20. T. Coningsby , ‘Chancellor, Vicar-General, Official Principal—a Bundle of Offices’, Ecclesiastical Law Journal 2 (1992), 273–85; cf. letter by A. Pearce, ibid., 383–5. On Catholic chancellors, B. A....

chancellor

chancellor   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
312 words

... , the royal official who had custody of the Irish great seal and was responsible for issuing letters in the king's name sealed with it. The first Irish chancellor was Ralph Neville , bishop of Chichester and chancellor of England, who was granted the Irish chancery for life in 1232 . The office was subsequently held by bishops and priors of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem in Ireland, as well as by administrators. The chancellor was the most senior member of the Irish council , frequently travelling around the country with the justiciar ...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Reference library

Concise Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
72 words

... 1881: 222; Somerset; London; Warwicks. English, Scottish: occupational name, nickname from Middle English, Anglo-Norman French chanceler (Latin cancellarius ) ‘usher of a lawcourt; keeper of records; secretary’. In medieval Sussex the name sometimes denoted customary tenants (villeins) and small free tenants, so it may also have been used as a nickname, perhaps for someone with clerical pretensions or who performed the role of chancellor in a folk play, tableau, or...

Chancellor

Chancellor   Reference library

Dictionary of American Family Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
95 words

... US frequency (2010): 4147 English and Scottish: status name for a secretary or administrative official, from Old French chancelier , Late Latin cancellarius ‘usher (in a law court)’. The King’s Chancellor was one of the highest officials in the land, but the term was also used to denote the holder of a variety of offices in the medieval world, such as the secretary or record keeper in a minor manorial household. In some cases the name undoubtedly originated as a nickname or as an occupational name for someone in the service of such an...

Lord Chancellor

Lord Chancellor   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
32 words

...Chancellor Head of the British legal system, an office of cabinet rank. The Lord Chancellor 's duties include acting as head of the judiciary and as Speaker of the House of...

Vice Chancellor

Vice Chancellor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
96 words

...Chancellor ( VC ) 1 A judge who is vice president of the Chancery Division of the High Court (the Lord Chancellor is the president but in practice rarely, if ever, sits in the Division). The Vice Chancellor is by statute responsible to the Lord Chancellor for the organization and management of the business of the Division and is ex officio a member of the Court of Appeal . 2 Formerly, a judge of the palatine courts . The title is still held by the judge assigned to exercise Chancery jurisdiction in...

Lord Chancellor

Lord Chancellor (UK)   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
233 words

...Lord Chancellor (UK) The position of Lord Chancellor, formerly both a ministerial and a judicial office, has been renamed ‘Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs and Lord Chancellor’: Constitutional Reform Act 2005 (UK). The Act ends the Lord Chancellor’s judicial role (some parts of which have been transferred to the Lord Chief Justice) and position as Lord Speaker of the House of Lords (now an elected position). The Lord Chancellor’s Department (UK) has been replaced by the Department for Constitutional Affairs ( DCA ), which administers the...

lord chancellor

lord chancellor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
155 words

...chancellor Edward the Confessor first created the post of chancellor, which has always remained one of the leading offices of state. The chancellor was keeper of the great seal and acted as chief secretary to the king, drawing up charters and writs. In the 14th cent. the chancellor entered the legal system when he began to hear appeals from subjects unable to obtain justice from the common law courts. From this it evolved that the chancellor became a judge in his own court, the Court of Chancery . He presided over the highest court of appeal in the...

Lord Chancellor

Lord Chancellor   Reference library

Anne Button

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...Chancellor . In All Is True ( Henry VIII ) he presides at the meeting of the Council (5.2) and formally accuses Cranmer of heresy. Anne...

Vice Chancellor

Vice Chancellor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
76 words

...Chancellor ( VC ) 1. Formerly, the judge who was the effective head of the Chancery Division of the High Court (the Lord Chancellor was the nominal president but in practice rarely, if ever, sat in the Division). In 2005 this office was renamed Chancellor of the High Court. 2. Formerly, a judge of the palatine courts . The title is still held by the judge assigned to exercise Chancery jurisdiction in...

Lord Chancellor

Lord Chancellor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
139 words

...Chancellor Historically, the head of the judiciary, a government minister (in charge of the Lord Chancellor’s Department), and Speaker of the House of Lords. He thus combined judicial, executive, and legislative functions. He was entitled to preside over the House when it sat as a final court of appeal; he appointed magistrates and higher judicial officials; and he oversaw such matters as the administration of the courts, the Community Legal Service, law reform, data protection, and human rights. Under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 the Lord Chancellor...

Lord Chancellor

Lord Chancellor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
138 words

...Chancellor Historically, the head of the judiciary, a government minister (in charge of the Lord Chancellor’s Department), and Speaker of the House of Lords. He thus combined judicial, executive, and legislative functions. He was entitled to preside over the House when it sat as a final court of appeal; he appointed magistrates and higher judicial officials; and he oversaw such matters as the administration of the courts, the Community Legal Service, law reform, data protection, and human rights. Under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005 the Lord Chancellor...

Chancellor, Richard

Chancellor, Richard (d. 1556)   Reference library

Roy C. Bridges

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
125 words

..., Richard ( d. 1556 ) . An explorer who opened up the first English contacts with Russia, Chancellor gained early experience of navigation and seamanship on voyages to the eastern Mediterranean. With the project to open a North-East Passage, he was chosen by Willoughby to be pilot-major of the first expedition in 1553 and sailed the Edward Bonaventure into the White Sea. He then travelled overland to Moscow and made a preliminary trade agreement with Ivan IV which inspired backers in England to set up the Muscovy Company ( Russia Company )....

lord chancellor

lord chancellor   Reference library

Richard A. Smith

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
258 words

...chancellor . Edward the Confessor first created the post of chancellor, which has always remained one of the leading offices of state. The chancellor was keeper of the great seal and acted as chief secretary to the king, drawing up charters and writs. When the office of justiciar ended in the mid-13th cent. the chancellor became the most important man in the country after the king. He was a leading adviser and presided over meetings of the great council . In the 14th cent. the chancellor entered the legal system when he began to hear appeals from...

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