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Overview

caveat emptor

Subject: Law

The principle that the buyer alone is responsible for checking the quality and suitability of goods before a purchase is made; the phrase is Latin and means, ‘let the buyer beware.’

caveat emptor

caveat emptor (Let the buyer beware) (Latin)   Reference library

The Handbook of International Financial Terms

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

... emptor (Let the buyer beware) (Latin) . A principle of unregulated markets and dealings between professionals ( cf. bazaar...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Marketing (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
19 words

... emptor Latin for ‘let the buyer beware’, from the principle that the buyer alone is responsible if...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Economics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
66 words

...caveat emptor Literally translated from Latin: let the buyer beware. This summarizes the principle that the buyer has to bear the risk of quality of their purchase. Considered as a legal principle, this is inconsistent with much modern legislation and many regulations designed to promote public health and safety by protecting buyers, who cannot reasonably be expected to be experts on all the products they purchase....

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
208 words

... emptor [Latin: let the buyer beware] A common-law maxim warning a purchaser that he could not claim that his purchases were defective unless he protected himself by obtaining express guarantees from the vendor. The maxim has been modified by statute: under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 (a consolidating statute), contracts for the sale of goods have implied terms requiring the goods to correspond with their description and any sample and, if they are sold in the course of a business, to be of satisfactory quality and fit for any purpose made known to the...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
208 words

... emptor [Latin: let the buyer beware] A common-law maxim warning a purchaser that he could not claim that his purchases were defective unless he protected himself by obtaining express guarantees from the vendor. The maxim has been modified by statute: under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 (a consolidating statute), contracts for the sale of goods have implied terms requiring the goods to correspond with their description and any sample and, if they are sold in the course of a business, to be of satisfactory quality and fit for any purpose made known to the...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Business and Management (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Business and Management
Length:
126 words

... emptor (Latin: let the buyer beware) A maxim implying that the purchaser of goods must take care to ensure that they are free from defects of quality, fitness, or title, i.e. that the risk is borne by the purchaser and not by the seller. If the goods turn out to be defective, the purchaser has no remedy against the seller. The rule does not apply if the purchaser is unable to examine the goods, if the defects are not evident from a reasonable examination, or if the seller has behaved fraudulently. Some measure of protection for the unwary purchaser is...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
259 words

... emptor The principle of caveat emptor (or buyer beware) underpins UK financial market regulation and regulation internationally. Financial market regulation generally seeks to ensure that an investor is provided with sufficient information to make an informed investment choice. It does not intervene paternalistically in that choice or attempt to direct investment decisions. Regulation rarely prevents an individual investor from making a particular decision, such as buying a risky, unregulated product; although it may prevent an investment from being...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
29 words

... emptor • cantor • lector • caveat emptor • centaur , mentor, stentor • Wichita • Choctaw • coldstore • Utah • drugstore • megastore • Minotaur • ...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

... emptor the principle that the buyer alone is responsible for checking the quality and suitability of goods before a purchase is made; the phrase is Latin and means, ‘let the buyer...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor interjection   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of Foreign Terms in English

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
73 words

... emptor interjection E16 Latin . (A maxim:) let the buyer beware! A robust antique principle that the purchaser, rather than the seller, is responsible for making sure that the quality of the goods purchased is satisfactory. Frequently invoked in the context of horse-dealing—the earliest recorded use in English is in J. Fitzherbert 's A newe tracte … for all husbande men ( 1523 )—it fails to find much favor under modern consumer protection...

caveat emptor

caveat emptor   Reference library

Oxford Business French Dictionary: English-French

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
6 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor phr   Reference library

Oxford Business Spanish Dictionary: English-Spanish

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
9 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
25 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
62 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
69 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor noun   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
28 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor noun   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
28 words
caveat emptor

caveat emptor  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The principle that the buyer alone is responsible for checking the quality and suitability of goods before a purchase is made; the phrase is Latin and means, ‘let the buyer beware.’
Italics

Italics   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
292 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...hospitable to foreign-looking words. That is, they become naturalized easily. And when that happens, the terms are written in ordinary roman type. ( See garner's law .) The words in the following list are italicized here only because they’re being referred to as words—e.g.: caveat emptor (L.), décolletage (Fr.), gestalt (Ger.), glasnost (Russ.). A good dictionary usually provides guidance on which words should be italicized. For more on foreignisms, see gallicisms & latinisms...

buyer

buyer  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The buyer has need of a hundred eyes, the seller of but one warning to a purchaser that it is their responsibility to examine goods on offer. Recorded from the mid 17th century; a similar saying is ...

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