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Overview

casuistry

Subject: History

n. 1. an approach to ethical analysis that is based on cases as distinct from principle-dependent or rule-based methods of evaluating moral problems. 2. an ...

Casuistry

Casuistry   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
15 words

... . The art of applying principles of moral theology to particular instances (Lat., casus ,...

casuistry

casuistry   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
69 words

... . The art or science of bringing general moral principles to bear on particular cases. The introduction of universal private Penance was the natural cause of the rise of formal casuistry in the Church, and by the 7th cent. ‘ Penitential Books ’ were common. From the 16th cent. various systems of casuistry, such as Probabilism , Probabiliorism , and Equiprobabilism , developed in the RC...

casuistry

casuistry   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
153 words

... . The art of resolving problems of conscience . The starting-point for the exercise of casuistry is the individual case ( casus ) of conscience, and characteristically involves answering the question whether an act that an agent wishes to perform does or does not conflict with a law. The art, which was particularly associated with priests exercising pastoral care, fell into disrepute partly because of the multiplication of fine distinctions that began to be made as ways were sought of so describing the act in question that it did not conflict with a...

Casuistry

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A Dictionary of Epidemiology (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Casuistry A method of reasoning and decision-making based on experience with and decisions about similar cases in the past; traditionally used in clinical medicine or in ethics . Medical casuistics is the study of cases of disease. ...

casuistry

casuistry n.   Quick reference

Concise Medical Dictionary (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Medicine and health, Clinical Medicine
Length:
47 words

... n. 1. case ethics: a method of ethical analysis that examines how the particular circumstances of different cases influence the ways in which general ethical principles should be applied. 2. an excessively subtle misuse of case ethics used to confuse an issue or excuse a...

casuistry

casuistry   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
183 words

...casuistry . The art or science of bringing general moral principles to bear upon particular cases. Its exercise is always called for in moral issues, whether the particular decision is made by individual judgement or in accordance with an established code, though the word ‘casuistry’ is generally restricted to the latter. The introduction of universal private Penance was the natural cause of the rise of formal casuistry in the Church, and by the 7th cent. ‘Libri Poenitentiales’ were common. Later these were replaced by various ‘Summae de Poenitentia’ which...

casuistry

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The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
122 words

... (Latin, casus , a case) The approach to ethical problems in which the circumstances of cases affect the application of general rules; a casuist is one who distinguishes and marshals the relevance of different cases and rules. The Resolutiones morales ( 1659 ) of the Spanish ‘prince of casuists’ Antonio Diana ( 1585–1683 ) discusses some 20,000 cases. The term is often used pejoratively, implying the multiplication of doubtful distinctions, and their use to defend apparently self-serving and conflicting moral verdicts. Casuistry as a discipline...

Casuistry

Casuistry   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
1,890 words

...was fairly spartan and his cases were as well; they have none of the imagination that marked Continental writings. But Perkins's casuistry is vintage Reformation writing: he begins his casuistry by asking how the reader can know that he or she has faith. This turn to the reader's own experience in conscience gives British Reformed casuistry a distinctiveness all its own. Unlike the Roman Catholic, Continental casuistry, Perkins and his successors wrote not for confessors but for ordinary people and often in the vernacular. This hundred-year period, from...

Casuistry

Casuistry   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
4,038 words

...of clinical casuistry. The following sketch of that methodology underscores what Jonsen means when he asserts “the form of reasoning constitutive of classical casuistry is rhetorical reasoning” (“Casuistry as Methodology in Clinical Ethics,” Theoretical Medicine 12, 1991 , pp. 295–307; hereafter “Methodology.”). This article focuses on Jonsen's casuistry because his conception of casuistry underscores the role of rhetoric in ethics like no other. Albert Jonsen on Clinical Casuistry. Jonsen's more refined and nuanced account of clinical casuistry begins with...

casuistry

casuistry   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
967 words

... The word “casuistry” comes from the Latin casus ( case ): a legal or canonical situation, a human action, a case of conscience whose moral value one seeks to establish since it does not appear very clear: this is the task of the casuist. This latter term was vulgarized by Pascal in the Provincial letters , but not until the mid 19 th c. did the Dictionnaire de l'Académie française admit “casuistry” ( casuistique ). Following the criticisms and attacks of Pascal, a restrictive and pejorative sense was added to, even when it did not, as often,...

casuistry

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A Dictionary of Public Health (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...casuistry 1. A method of decision-making in bioethics based on a combination of prior moral beliefs, usually with a foundation in religious faith, and their application in cases with similar features to those of the case under consideration. 2. A method of reasoning in which conclusions are based on data from individual case(s). For this reason, conclusions may not be generalizable. ...

casuistry

casuistry   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
96 words

...casuistry Case-based reasoning. The science, art, or reasoning of the casuist. Known in Jewish law, perhaps derived from the Mesopotamian law codes of Hammurabi (‘If an ox gores a man …’). Cf apodictic laws which command (‘Thou shalt not steal’). ‘The part of Ethics which resolves cases of conscience, applying the general rules of religion and morality to particular instances in which “circumstances alter cases”, or in which there appears to be a conflict of duties. Often (and perhaps originally) applied to a quibbling or evasive way of dealing with difficult...

casuistry

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
110 words

... • hara-kiri • ribaldry • chivalry • Tishri • figtree • wintry • poetry • casuistry • Babbittry • banditry • pedigree • punditry • verdigris • sophistry • porphyry • gadgetry • registry • Valkyrie • marquetry , parquetry • basketry • trinketry • daiquiri • coquetry , rocketry • circuitry • varletry • filigree • palmistry • biochemistry , chemistry, photochemistry • gimmickry , mimicry • asymmetry , symmetry • craniometry , geometry, micrometry, optometry, psychometry, pyrometry, sociometry, trigonometry • tenebrae • ministry •...

casuistry

casuistry noun   Quick reference

Oxford Paperback Thesaurus (4 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
8 words
casuistry

casuistry noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
59 words
casuistry

casuistry noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
71 words
casuistry

casuistry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
n.1. an approach to ethical analysis that is based on cases as distinct from principle-dependent or rule-based methods of evaluating moral problems. 2. an excessively subtle or opaque form of ...
History

History   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,067 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...different from those of his own time as to block any simple ‘conversion’ of the one into the other. We must not fail to recognize that, along with their concern for cultural anachronism, both Shelley's play and Scott's fiction show a particular fascination with the history of casuistry and the concept of the moral case. In this conjunction lies a further line of enquiry into the question of how it is that Mill could insist on his age's general contemporary preoccupation with the comparison of itself with other ages. To accept the view that human character is...

contextualism/formalism

contextualism/formalism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(ethics)Formalism is the doctrine that morality should be structured by a set of abstract principles of a high degree of generality: that morality should aspire to be a kind of geometry of rights, ...
Manoel de Sá

Manoel de Sá  

(c.1530–96), Portuguese Jesuit. In 1595 he published Aphorismi Confessariorum, a manual of casuistry in dictionary form. It was put on the Index in 1603 for allowing confession and absolution to be ...

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