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careen

Subject: History

Kǝˈrēn v. 1 turn (a ship) on its side for cleaning, caulking, or repair. 2 (of a ship) tilt; lean over: a heavy flood tide caused my ...

careen

careen v.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

... kǝ'rēn v. 1 turn (a ship) on its side for cleaning, caulking, or repair. 2 (of a ship) tilt; lean over: a heavy flood tide caused my vessel to careen...

careen

careen vb.   Reference library

Garner's Modern English Usage (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
443 words

... ; career , vb. Careen = (1) v.i., to tip or tilt <the sailboat careened and then sank> ; or (2) v.t., to cause to tip or tilt <they careened the ship on the beach to scrape the barnacles and caulk the seams> . Career = to move wildly at high speed. E.g.: “His car overturned yesterday after careering out of control across three lanes of the motorway.” “M4 Driver Drowns,” Sunday Telegraph , 11 Feb. 1990 , at 2. Since the early 20th century, AmE has made careen do the job of career , as by saying that a car careened down the street. On...

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careen   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2021
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
95 words

...careen [L16th] Latin carina originally meant ‘a nutshell’, and from this came to be used for the hull of a ship and then its keel. Passing through French, it came into English in the sense ‘the position of a ship on its side to make repairs to the hull or keel’, often for scraping of barnacles and weed, or for the action of doing this. In the USA in the early 20th century careen came to be used to mean ‘to rush headlong, hurtle’, probably influenced by career , and this is now widely...

careen, to

careen, to   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
161 words

...other way, and the operation repeated so that the opposite side could be cleaned. Small craft are still occasionally careened for cleaning on suitable beaches, but the cleaning of larger vessels is always now done in a dry-dock . A suitable beach where ships could be careened was known as a careenage . See also hog ; parliament heel...

careen

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
21 words

... position of a ship heeled over. XVI. — F. carène , † carine — It. carena , repr. L. carīna keel. Hence careen vb. ...

careen

careen vb.   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
237 words

... ; career , vb. Careen = (1) v.i., to tip or tilt <the sailboat careened and then sank>; or (2) v.t., to cause to tip or tilt <they careened the ship on the beach to scrape the barnacles and caulk the seams> . Career = to move wildly at high speed <the car was careering out of control>. Since the early 20th century, AmE has tried to make careen do the job of career , as by saying that a car careened down the street. On September 7, 1992 , in a campaign speech in Wisconsin, President George Bush said that “product liability has careened ...

careen

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Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... is originally a nautical word (recorded by the geographer Hakluyt in 1600 ) referring to the tilting or turning over of a ship, either at sea or in dock for repairs. In AmE careen has developed the meaning ‘hurtle or rush headlong’: A lot of Russians careening along the road on liberated bicycles — H. Roosenburg , 1957 The van careened across the road, almost running into the ditch — B. Moore , 1987 . In this use it has been influenced by the similar-sounding but unrelated word career , which is the standard word for this meaning in...

careen

careen (verb)   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
176 words

...careen (verb) . In origin a nautical word (first recorded in Hakluyt, 1600 ) meaning ‘to turn (a ship) over on one side for cleaning, caulking, or repairing’, or, intransitively, ‘(of a ship) to lean over, to tilt when sailing on wind’, careen carries a residual notion in non-nautical contexts of leaning or tilting. In a separate modern development in American English, since the 1920s, careen has rapidly become standard in the sense ‘to rush headlong, to hurtle, especially with an unsteady motion’, i.e. the speed is more central to the meaning than...

careen

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New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
123 words

... • Aberdeen , Amin, aquamarine, baleen, bean, been, beguine, Benin, between, canteen, careen, Claudine, clean, contravene, convene, cuisine, dean, Dene, e'en, eighteen, fascine, fedayeen, fifteen, figurine, foreseen, fourteen, Francine, gean, gene, glean, gombeen, green, Greene, Halloween, intervene, Janine, Jean, Jeannine, Jolene, Kean, keen, Keene, Ladin, langoustine, latrine, lean, limousine, machine, Maclean, magazine, Malines, margarine, marine, Mascarene, Massine, Maxine, mean, Medellín, mesne, mien, Moline, moreen, mujahedin, Nadine, nankeen,...

Careen

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A Dictionary of First Names (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Names studies
Length:
68 words

... ♀ Modern name of uncertain derivation. Its first appearance seems to have been in Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind ( 1936 ), where it is borne by one of the sisters of Scarlett O'Hara. The name may represent a combination of Cara with the diminutive suffix -een (of Irish origin, as in Maureen ), or it may be an altered form of Corinne or Carina...

careen

careen verb   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
122 words
careen

careen verb   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
122 words
careen

careen verb   Reference library

Australian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
76 words
careen

careen verb   Reference library

The New Zealand Oxford Dictionary

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
68 words
careen

careen verb   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
63 words
careen

careen  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Kǝˈrēnv.1 turn (a ship) on its side for cleaning, caulking, or repair.2 (of a ship) tilt; lean over: a heavy flood tide caused my vessel to careen dizzily.[...]
pouches

pouches  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
An old name for the small bulkheads, often temporary. They were erected in the holds of a cargo ship when a shifting cargo, such as corn or coal, was loaded, their purpose being to prevent its ...
relieving tackles

relieving tackles  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 Two strong tackles used in sailing men-of-war to provide a safeguard against a ship overturning when it was being careened on a beach with little slope down to the water.2 Purchases rigged on ...
outrigger

outrigger  

1 An extension to each side of the crosstrees of a sailing vessel to spread the backstays, in a schooner the topmast backstays, and in a square-rigged ship the topgallant and royal backstays.2 A type ...
Luis Russell

Luis Russell  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
B. 6 August 1902, Careening Clay, Bocas Del Toro, Panama, d. 11 December 1963. After playing various instruments in his homeland, Russell moved to New Orleans in 1919 and thereafter ...

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