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Overview

canonical

Describing something classical, archetypal, or prototypic, often applied to a sequence of nucleotides or amino acids that reflects the most common choice of base or amino acid at each ...

canonical

canonical   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... Standard format of expression. For example, y = mx + c and ax + by + c =0 are canonical forms for the equation of a straight line in a plane. See also quadric...

canonical

canonical   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... 1. Representing a typical exemplar or realization of a category . For example, canonical nouns denote people, places, or entities, and the canonical realization of a direct object in English is a noun phrase . 2. Representing a typical pattern of formal or functional elements. For example, [ determinative ( 1 ) + noun] represents a basic canonical noun phrase pattern, and subject – predicator – object represents a canonical clause pattern. 3. The same as kernel . See also element...

canonical

canonical   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
89 words

... Characteristic or most frequent, either in a particular language or across languages in general. Thus a canonical form of words or syllables is a phonological pattern to which they typically conform; a canonical clause, as defined e.g. by Huddleston and Pullum, CGEL , is declarative and active, as opposed to a ‘non‐canonical’ interrogative or passive. Also in a sense of ‘simplest’ or ‘most straightfoward’. Thus a pattern e.g. of ‘one form one meaning’ might be called ‘canonical’ in that the description of other patterns is more...

canonical

canonical   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Biomedicine (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019

...canonical Describing something classical, archetypal, or prototypic, often applied to a sequence of nucleotides or amino acids that reflects the most common choice of base or amino acid at each position. A canonical pathway is the orthodox or accepted pathway, a term often used e.g. for the wnt signalling...

canonical

canonical   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
103 words

... A canonical derivation in logic is one satisfying some set of conditions that are laid down: thus it may be important to show that if there is a derivation of B from A, there is a particular kind of derivation, en route to showing some result of proof theory . More widely the term may refer to a derivation which mirrors the structure of what is proved, as opposed to an indirect derivation that does not. A canonical description of a sentence would be one that revealed its basic structure or showed how the sentence is built by transformations from a...

canonical form

canonical form   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
11 words

... form or canonical structure an older name for contributing structure...

canonical form

canonical form   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Chemistry (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2020
Subject:
Science and technology, Chemistry
Length:
17 words

... form One of the possible structures of a molecule that together form a resonance ...

visitation, canonical

visitation, canonical   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
64 words

...canonical An official visit by the bishop or his delegate to promote religious discipline and oversee upkeep in places under his jurisdiction. Some *monasteries , preferring visitation by religious superiors, sought exemption from visitation by bishops, many of whom neglected their canonical right. See also archdiocese ; clergy ; visitations, episcopal . Raeleen Chai-Elsholz J. Gilchrist , ‘ Visitation, Canonical, History of ’, NCE (1967), vol. 14,...

canonical link

canonical link   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Social Media

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
43 words

...canonical link ( canonical URL ) The location specified in an HTML tag (embedded within a document HEAD) which is the preferred, official URL for search engines to use when indexing that website. See also link ; permalink ; SEO ; URL . Compare dynamic link...

canonical basis

canonical basis   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... basis The set of orthogonal unit vectors which form the simplest basis of n -dimensional Euclidean space. In 3-dimensional space the vectors i , j , k in the directions OX, OY, OZ form the canonical...

canonical sequence

canonical sequence   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
16 words

... sequence a nucleotide or amino‐acid sequence regarded as the archetype with which variants are...

Hours, Canonical

Hours, Canonical   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
23 words

...Canonical . The times of daily prayer laid down in the Divine Office and especially the services to be recited at...

age, canonical

age, canonical   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
30 words

...canonical . The age, fixed by canon law , at which a person becomes capable of undertaking special duties, etc. The term is used especially in connection with ordination...

canonical sequence

canonical sequence n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... sequence n. In genetics, another name for a consensus sequence . [From Latin canonicus living under a rule, from canon a rule, from Greek kanon a rule or measuring...

Hours, canonical

Hours, canonical   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
41 words

...canonical . The individual services of the divine office . In both E. and W. Christianity, these have traditionally been reckoned as seven, following Psalm 119. 164: mattins and lauds (counted together as one hour), prime, terce, sext, none , vespers , and compline...

age, canonical

age, canonical   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
84 words

...age, canonical . The age, fixed by canon law , at which a person becomes capable of undertaking special duties, of enjoying special privileges, or of entering specified new states of life. The term is esp. used in connection with ordination , for which in the C of E the canonical age for a deacon is ‘twenty-three … unless he have a faculty ’; for a priest ‘twenty-four … unless being over twenty-three he have a faculty’; and for a bishop at least...

collections, canonical

collections, canonical   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
125 words

...canonical Ecclesiastical legislative texts organized chronologically or systematically. They could include genuine or apocryphal, authentic (officially promulgated) or private, and general or particular material such as concerning particular *heresies or *schisms , individual churches or countries, special points of discipline, collections of ecclesiastical formulae, *capitularies , *penitential canons, *councils , and catalogues of ecclesiastical sanctions. See also law, canon ; corpus iuris canonici . Peter Petkoff C. Gallagher , Church...

canonical form

canonical form   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Electronics and Electrical Engineering (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... form A standard way of describing mathematical objects designed to make it easier to compare such objects. The issue arises where a given mathematical value can be written in many different ways. For example, the order in which elements of a set of numbers are listed is not important as far as the mathematical meaning is concerned, but listing them in numeric order makes it much easier to compare two large sets to see if they are the same. In Boolean algebra there are a number of possible canonical forms. For example, any Boolean algebra expression...

canonical sequence

canonical sequence   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Genetics (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
96 words

... sequence an archetypical sequence (also known as a consensus sequence ) to which all variants are compared. A sequence that describes the nucleotides most often present in a DNA segment of interest. For example, in the Pribnow box and the Hogness box, the canonical sequences are TATAAT and TATAAAA, respectively. The 14 nucleotide consensus sequence CCGT N TG Y AA R TGT has 11 nucleotides that are constant throughout the populations sampled. However, at position 5 any nucleotide ( N ) can be present, at the position 8 either pyrimidine ( Y ) can occur,...

Canonical Criticism

Canonical Criticism   Reference library

Corrine L. Carvalho

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Biblical Interpretation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
6,700 words

... Canonical Criticism Canonical criticism, canon criticism, and the canonical approach are terms often used interchangeably, even though the proponents of each discipline have diligently attempted to keep them distinct. What all three disciplines have in common is a general focus on the canonical shaping of the text as a significant locus of meaning. They differ, however, in their motivation, goals, and procedures. While the practitioners of canon and canonical criticism place their work within the scope of modern methods of biblical interpretation,...

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