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Overview

breach of the peace

Subject: Law

The state that occurs when harm is done or likely to be done to a person or (in his presence) to his property, or when a person is in fear of being harmed through an assault, affray, or ...

breach of the peace

breach of the peace   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (10 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Law
Length:
110 words

... of the peace The state that occurs when harm is done or likely to be done to a person or (in his presence) to his property, or when a person is in fear of being harmed through an assault , affray , or other disturbance. At common law, anyone may lawfully arrest a person for a breach of the peace committed in his presence, or when he reasonably believes that a person is about to commit or renew such a breach. To breach the peace is a crime in Scotland; elsewhere, magistrates may bind over a person to keep the peace. See also arrest ; offences...

breach of the peace

breach of the peace   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
169 words

... of the peace ( BoP ) The state that occurs when harm is done or likely to be done to a person or (in his presence) to his property, or when a person is in fear of being harmed through an assault , affray , or other disturbance. At common law , anyone may lawfully arrest a person for a breach of the peace committed in his presence, or when he reasonably believes that a person is about to commit or renew such a breach. To breach the peace is a crime in Scotland; elsewhere, magistrates may bind over a person to keep the peace. The Court of Appeal...

breach of the peace

breach of the peace   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Law

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Law
Length:
306 words

... of the peace A form of misbehaviour which is a criminal offence in Scotland and which, though not a criminal offence as such in England and Wales or in Northern Ireland, may justify the summary arrest of a person in order to prevent its commission, and in respect of which the person responsible may also be ‘bound over’—ie required to promise to abstain from it in future, on pain of forfeiting a sum of money known as a ‘recognizance’. If the legal consequences of committing a breach of the peace are clear, less certain are the types of behaviour that...

breach of the peace

breach of the peace   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
107 words

...breach of the peace A state of affairs in which violence or threatened violence of others is likely to be provoked by the offender’s conduct. The common law in the United Kingdom has been settled ( R v Howell [ 1982 ] QB 416): ‘there cannot be a breach of the peace unless there has been an act done, or threatened to be done, which either actually harms a person, or in his presence, his property, or is likely to cause such harm, or which puts someone in fear of such harm being done’ ( Nilsson v McDonald [ 2009 ] TASSC 66). See also New South Wales v...

breach of the peace

breach of the peace n   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Italian Dictionary: English-Italian (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
10 words
breach of the peace

breach of the peace noun   Reference library

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
21 words
breach of the peace

breach of the peace  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The state that occurs when harm is done or likely to be done to a person or (in his presence) to his property, or when a person is in fear of being harmed through an assault, affray, or other ...
Local Government

Local Government   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,202 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...disturbers of courts, extortion and oppression by officials, menaces, forced purveyance, buying goods on the way to market or forcing up the price before it had begun (i.e. regrating and forestalling), the malpractices of innkeepers and victuallers, breaches of the assize of bread and beer and weights and measures, a long list of breaches of labour regulations and into peace provisions such as whether watches and hue and cry were being carried out’ ( A. L. Brown , The Governance of Late Medieval England, 1272–1461 ( 1989 ), 124). This shows how the justices’...

Henry V

Henry V   Reference library

Michael Dobson and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,163 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...way for a grand recreation of Harry and Catherine’s betrothal ceremony. In England the role became a favourite of Frank Benson from 1899 onwards: his athletic ascent of the proscenium arch in full armour during ‘Once more unto the breach’ and his subsequent vaulting over the walls of Harfleur remain legendary, although he had strong competition during the Boer War years from Lewis Waller. The play was much revived during the First World War ( Sybil Thorndike played the Chorus at the Old Vic) and remained a favourite during the inter-war years, with ...

Henry IV Part 2

Henry IV Part 2   Reference library

Michael Dobson

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
2,727 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and Lord Bardolph discuss the prospects of their rebellion, comforted to reflect that only a third of the King’s forces can march against them, the rest divided between opposing Glyndŵr in Wales and fighting the French: the Archbishop comments on the fickleness of public opinion, as Henry Bolingbroke’s former supporters are now rallying to them, nostalgic for the dead Richard II. 2.1 Mistress Quickly has Sir John arrested for breach of promise, explaining, before the Lord Chief Justice, who happens to pass, that he has lived at her expense for many years,...

Micah

Micah   Reference library

H. G. M. Williamson and H. G. M. Williamson

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
5,013 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...of their exercise of power is that it amounts to a breach of the Ten Commandments ( v. 2 ). The threat is therefore directed initially against a relatively small circle in Judean society, who will have no part in the future reconstruction after the Assyrian devastation is over ( v. 5 ). Again, however, the later addition of ‘against this family’ ( v. 3; cf. Am 3:2 ) suggests that the passage has subsequently been reread after the Babylonian exile in terms of national sin and judgement. A Prophetic Disputation ( 2:6–11 with 12–13 ). The plural...

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

R. W. Hoyle

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,753 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...breach of contract, debt, defamation, and so on. A proportion of the cases of riot which came before it were actually about title, although, in theory, real property cases were barred to the court, a rule which was restated in 1552 and then adhered to. The majority of cases were between parties; relatively few were inspired by the state, but a handful of cases from the 1630s have coloured the whole history of the court. It was abolished in 1642 as an abuse of power; the Court of Requests and the Councils in the North and Wales withered away at around the...

Transitions and Trajectories: Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire

Transitions and Trajectories: Jews and Christians in the Roman Empire   Reference library

Barbara Geller

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
14,334 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the title and remaining responsibilities of the pontifex maximus, ordering also the removal of the altar of Victory from the senate. This action further widened the breach between the state and the old Roman religion. In 391, Theodosius I (379–95; joint emperor, 379–92) ordered that all temples be closed and that all forms of pagan worship cease. In the aftermath of the emperor's edicts, the bishop of Alexandria ordered the destruction of the city's main temple, the great Serapeum. This pattern of destruction continued, in Alexandria, Carthage, Gaza, and...

Ephesians

Ephesians   Reference library

J. D. G. Dunn and J. D. G. Dunn

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
17,129 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... 2:14–16 ). And the experience of grace (in conversion) can itself be likened to a dying ( Rom 6:5–11 ). But a life enmeshed in its breaches of the moral code (transgressions) and repeated failings (sins) can well be likened to a state of death, where promptings of divine grace and love evoke no real response ( cf. Luke 15:24; Rom 7:7–11 —‘I died’). (2) Their daily conduct had been determined by the standards of society ( cf. Rom 12:2 ), the spirit of the age ( v. 2 ). The latter metaphor is unique in the NT (‘the ruler of the power of the air’; cf. Jn 12:31...

1 & 2 Kings

1 & 2 Kings   Reference library

Walter Dietrich, Walter Dietrich, and Walter Dietrich

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
40,434 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...(like the fall of the kingdom of Israel in 722 bce ) as the result of countless breaches of the first commandment. B. Authorship and Sources. 1. Since the verdict on the kings was rigidly integrated into the king-frames which form the skeletal structure of Kings, the latter cannot have been written before the time of Josiah. Whilst researchers agree on this basic point, variations have been discussed. Was there in fact one single author who described the history of the kings (and beyond this a greater work about the history of Israel from the time of Moses)...

1 Maccabees

1 Maccabees   Reference library

U. Rappaport and U. Rappaport

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
27,583 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...reading, the Jews left the Temple Mount as a result of the peace conditions. This is strengthened by the fact that later on the temple was not in the rebels' hands. See 1 macc 7:33 . v. 62 , it is hard to say if indeed the king broke his word, or if the author describes the destruction of the wall as a breach of the agreement with the rebels. It seems to me that, as in Beth-zur, the besieged got a free leave from the place and nothing else. By attributing to the king this act the author tries to save the prestige of Judas, who was forced into an almost...

Churches in Context: The Jesus Movement in the Roman World

Churches in Context: The Jesus Movement in the Roman World   Reference library

Daniel N. Schowalter

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
17,885 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...Nero's death and the end of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, however, created a situation in which boundaries between the upper classes in Rome could be breached solely on the basis of military strength. After learning that his son Domitian was in control of affairs in Rome, Vespasian left his other son, Titus, in command of the troops in Judea and began his journey to the capital. On the way he stopped in Alexandria to ensure that the Egyptian troops would support his imperial claim. He also visited the famous temple of the Egyptian mystery...

Into Exile: From the Assyrian Conquest of Israel to the Fall of Babylon

Into Exile: From the Assyrian Conquest of Israel to the Fall of Babylon   Reference library

Mordechai Cogan

Oxford History of the Biblical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
17,701 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
2

...for eighteen months until the summer of 586. The arrival of Egyptian forces did provide a short respite as the Babylonian army withdrew to meet them, but not for long. After the defeat of the Egyptians, who had once again shown themselves to be an unreliable “broken reed of a staff” ( 2 Kings 18.21 ), the siege resumed. In the end, severe hunger brought the city to its knees. The walls of Jerusalem were breached, probably on the north, where the topography lends itself to the setting up of siege machinery, and where a great quantity of Babylonian-style...

Ezra–Nehemiah

Ezra–Nehemiah   Reference library

Daniel L. Smith-Christopher and Daniel L. Smith-Christopher

The Oxford Bible Commentary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2022
Subject:
Religion
Length:
18,603 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

... the palace is taken by Williamson ( 1985 : 56) to mean, ‘in the pay of the court’. Perhaps it relates to an oath of office ( Num 18:19; 2 Chr 13:5 ). vv. 15–16 , the accusations against Jerusalem continue—this time including a Persian loanword eštaddûr ( Rosenthal 1974 : 59 ) which refers to a ‘breach of the peace’. Because of these troublesome activities, the city was ‘laid waste’ ( ḥ-r-b ). The appeal to the Persian authorities is based on royal interests; historical precedent (note v. 16 , ‘rebuilt’, i.e. built as before); common interest in...

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